Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

 

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

 

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

 

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

Bluebird.FAQ (revision 3.1.1.0)

This FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) deals with Bluebirds (predominantly Eastern Bluebirds, but I will try to include Western and Mountain Bluebirds as often as possible). Much of this information also pertains to other cavity nesting birds such as Chickadees, Titmice, etc.  Don't be misled this FAQ doesn't answer all the questions you might have about bluebirds.  In fact my intent is to pique your interest, get the basics covered, and to give you information where to go for follow-up information.  For those of you interested there are web pages for other cavity nesters:

bulletChickadees at http://www.jtan.com/~jack/ckd.html
bulletPurple Martins at http://www.purplemartin.org/

Other web sites with Bluebird FAQ's, Facts & Basic Information

bulletNorth American Bluebird Society (NABS) Bluebird Fact Sheets & FAQ bulletBluebirds Across Nebraska (BAN) Bluebirding Basics & FAQ bulletPrescott Western Bluebird Recovery Project FAQ

This FAQ is available to those with a WWW browser on the internet at: <http://audubon-omaha.org/bbbox/bbfaq.htm> , I also maintain a web site called The Bluebird Box <http://audubon-omaha.org/bbbox/index.htm> if you didn't get here from there visit it. The Bluebird box is where I'll keep references to all the Bluebird related material I find on the internet.

Probably the most significant part of my web site is The Best Of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified.  I have classified messages posted to the bluebird mailing lists listed below.

 

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

 

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

 

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

Bluebird Forums and Mailing Lists

Bluebird forums: (web based message services - you post messages and read messages from your web browser.  I don't monitor these too frequently and the messages are not included in the Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified) bulletThe bluebird forum on the GardenWeb formerly known as the Nature.Net. This one is now a members only forum.  You can read the messages, but to participate you must register. bulletBluebird Nut Cafe run by the chief nut Cherie. bulletThe American Family Bluebird Trail Project Bluebird Forum bulletRosebud's Bluebird Message Board bulletBirdBuzz has a bluebird forum area in the Buzz Club.  This one is run by Bird Watcher's Digest and Bill Thompson is a regular contributor.

Mailing lists bulletBluebird-L list run by Cornell (to subscribe send email to listproc@cornell.edu with a subject and single line of text containing "SUBSCRIBE BLUEBIRD-L your name" - replace your name with your real name) or for more information check out the following Bluebird Reference Guide bulletBluebird list run by Dusty Bleher to subscribe and for complete information check out http://fsinc.com/wildbirds/Bluebird/List bulletCavity Nesting Birds list/forum - this is a yahoo group, therefore it can be viewed as a web based forum or received as mailing list. It is to be a temporary alternative mailing list when the regular bluebird-l is down moderated by Barry Whitney.  To subscribe, go to
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Bluebird-L/join
  bulletnhsk list/forum - this is a yahoo group, therefore it can be viewed as a web based forum or received as mailing list. The alternatives to killing house sparrows list moderated by Fawzi Emad. Subscribe at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/nhsk/join  bulletCavnet scientific discussions concerning cavity-nesting birds. This list has been created for researchers, academics, and others with a common interest in discussing the scientific aspects of cavity nesters. Subscribe at http://bio.fsu.edu/~jameslab/

Chats

bulletChatroom in Yahoo listed as Bluebirds Unlimited and the topic is Bluebird Recovery in America. Darrell Darrell in N.E. Ohio Stark County Coordinator Ohio Bluebird Society

 

Home
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Feeding Bluebirds
Best Of...
Gallery
Forums/Mailing Lists
Groups/Resources
Personal Sites
Commercial Sites
Bluebirders Pictures
Monitor Form
Calls/Songs
Miscellaneous
Table Of Contents
Maps
First Egg 2000
First Egg 2001
First Egg 2002
Over Winter 2001
Over Winter 2002
BB Survey
CBC
BB Ref Guide


Maps


Maps

WHAT IS A BLUEBIRD?

The Bluebird is a member of the thrush family related to the American Robin. The Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis) is generally found in the eastern half of North America to the Rocky Mountains. The Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) is found from the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains west to the Pacific coast of the North America. The Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana) is typically found west of the Rocky Mountains. All three species are blue on the back. The Eastern has a red breast and white belly. The Mountain is slightly larger than the Eastern and does not have the red breast. The Western is similar to the Eastern with the red of the breast spreading around to the back.

Bluebirds are NOT Bluejays, Indigo Buntings, or any other bird species that is blue.

WHAT IS ACCEPTABLE BLUEBIRD HABITAT?

The natural habitat of Bluebirds are open fields, prairies, and meadows with few trees or shrubs. The natural nest location is an old woodpecker hole or rotted (hollow) limb on a tree. The artificial habitat that man has created that is usable by the Bluebird includes broome fields, horse and cattle pastures, cemeteries, golf courses etc. This artificial habitat should be one that does not include the use of pesticides, as they can be harmful to the insect eating birds. Man has taken up the Bluebird cause and has created nest boxes for the Bluebirds on both the natural and artificial habitat areas. Woodland habitat is less favorable to bluebirds, but there are a number of other species that would make use of a Bluebird nest box in such habitat. These would include House Wrens, Chickadees, Great-Crested Flycatcher, Nuthatches, Titmice. Placing a Bluebird box in woodland habitat is not necessarily bad but, Bluebirds nesting there would probably be usurped by other birds (most probably house wrens).  Where house wrens or flying squirrels are present in your area then these two species may take over use of your bluebird nestboxes in mostly wooded areas. Other wrens are not considered a problem.

WHAT IS A BLUEBIRD TRAIL?

A loose definition of a Bluebird trail is a single Bluebird nest box, monitored for the removal of undesirable birds (House sparrows). Many trails are much longer, some consisting of hundreds of boxes. A more typical trail might consist of six to thirty boxes. Naturally the trail should be in the best Bluebird habitat available in the area.

WHAT IS A BLUEBIRD NEST BOX?

There are many good Bluebird nest box designs. Such as Peterson's, Gilbertson's, NABS, slot box, and the many variations of these boxes. What constitutes a good box is primarily a box that the bluebird's will use, you can monitor, and the predators can't get into.

The entrance hole for Eastern and Western Bluebirds should be one and one-half inches in diameter (the Peterson Box hole size is an oval (1&3/8" x 2&1/4") and Mountain Bluebirds should have a one and nine-sixteenths inch hole or (Peterson, 1&1/2" x 2 1/4").  Not to confuse the issue but a well respected bluebirder, Keith Kridler, makes the following comments on the use of the oval Peterson entrance: "Well the Peterson Oval entrance 1&3/8" wide is a KNOWN AND PROVEN entrance that allows starlings from all over north America to "easily enter and leave nestboxes." The last is a quote from Kevin Berner's article! For the last 70 years bluebird conservationists have fought to educate the public to use an entrance hole to "positively exclude ALL starlings""

The box material should be untreated wood such as cedar or redwood. It is acceptable to use pine but under no circumstances should the box be painted on the inside. Do not use the cardboard boxes that some of the schools have allowed students to paint as Bluebird boxes.

Ventilation is also another key ingredient in good box design. In colder climates the ventilation holes can be plugged until warm weather arrives.

WHERE CAN I OBTAIN BLUEBIRD BOXES FROM?

There are many reputable dealers that build good nest boxes. The designers of boxes themselves (such as Steve Gilbertson) sell boxes that they build. State Bluebird organizations often sell nest boxes or recommend nest box manufacturers. A list of nest box dealers is included at the end of the FAQ. Garden centers, nurseries, and nature stores sell boxes but be careful, often their boxes are of inferior design (they can't be opened for cleaning, have a perch, entrance hole wrong size, etc). Nature store boxes also tend to be expensive when compared to boxes from other sources.

WHERE SHOULD NEST BOXES BE PLACED?

Ideally the nest box should be placed on a metal post, such as a fence post or electrical conduit that is not part of a fence line. The boxes should be 50 feet from nearby bushes and trees and 200 feet if house wrens are a problem. The nest boxes should be placed about 200 to 300 feet apart. I generally place mine such that the view from one box to the next is obscured by distance, an obstruction (such as a hill, tree, etc), or other barrier. If Tree Swallows are using your boxes then the boxes should be paired (distance between boxes (15 to 22')), then spaced 300 feet to next pair.

The nest box should be placed no higher than what is convenient to monitor. Bluebirds will actually tolerate boxes mounted much higher (twenty feet) or as low as three feet. I recommend five feet as this is a height that most people can monitor easily (The real experts will suggest five feet as a minimum).

The opening of the nest box should be directed away from prevailing winds to prevent rain from being blown into the box opening. The birds themselves don't mind which direction the opening faces, but if the fledglings are exposed to moisture and cold this can cause hypothermia. When specific orientation is an option orient the box opening away from the hottest exposure to the sun away from the nest box opening. Although any box orientation might be used reports indicate the most often selected and most successful box has the hole facing either east or slightly northeast. The boxes can placed around a field in a circle to make a monitoring circle.

HOW DO I MONITOR MY BLUEBIRD TRAIL?

Boxes should be in place (if taken down in the winter) or cleaned and unplugged (if plugged to prevent mice or house sparrows from roosting in the box) early in the year (late February or early March).

Box monitoring can be started slowly in the early part of the season (every other week is sufficient). When nest building begins the boxes should be monitored on a weekly basis as a minimum, and no more often than twice a week. Monitor weekly only until nestlings are 12-13 days, then after they fledge remove old nesting material then resume weekly monitoring. Weekly monitoring should continue until the season is over (usually mid August). The box should be checked and closed as quickly as possible. You should spend as little time at the box as necessary to prevent scaring off any possible nesting Bluebirds.  Western Bluebirds fledge at an average of 21 days. 

When checking the box all House Sparrow nests should be removed along with eggs. The House Sparrow eggs should be destroyed or can be taken to a local nature center for feeding to snakes. If box monitoring is done on a weekly basis, house sparrows may be able to build a nest and lay eggs but they will have insufficient time to hatch the eggs. Many bluebirders trap House Sparrows but that presents a problem for some in that the captured birds must be destroyed.

There will be other nests found in the nest boxes, typically these will be from House Wrens, Nuthatches, Great-Crested Flycatchers, Chickadees, Titmice and other cavity nesting birds. These other species with the exception of the House Wren will not cause trouble on your Bluebird trail. It is a violation of Federal law to disturb all of these species while nesting However, many bluebirders will remove dummy House Wren nests (Boxes filled to the top with sticks). Removing wren sticks placed by the male is legal; the nest is the cup the female puts on top of the sticks, and that of course is protected by federal and state laws. Also house wrens are a very territorial bird and can cause considerable problems on a Bluebird trail.

Old Bluebird nests should be removed after the babies have fledged. I have found that failing to remove the nests will result in the nest being invaded by ants after the birds have fledged. There is a new school of thought that the old nest should be left. I feel that might be acceptable for the last brood of the season but not until then. There are studies that indicate Bluebirds are predisposed to use a box with an old nest in it.

HOW DO I KNOW WHEN I HAVE A BLUEBIRD NEST IN MY NEST BOX?

It is actually very easy to determine a Bluebird nest. Bluebirds have a very neat nest made from fine grasses (occasionally pine needles) in a nice cup shape. Typically there will be no seed heads, cigarette butts, strings, sticks, or other junk in a Bluebird nest. Occasionally there will be some cattle or horse hair in the Bluebird nest. Bluebirds keep the nest relatively neat by removing fecal sacs and other debris. Dick Purvis who is a well know bluebirder informs me that "Western bluebirds primarily make their nests out of dry grass. However, they will use anything conveniently near that is equivalent. Many of mine make their nest entirely of conifer needles. They may be influenced by the fact that some of the conifers here have needles that are very long up to 6 to 8 inches. Bluebirds whose nestboxes are in cottonwood trees use the inner bark of the cottonwood for their nest. This is a soft thin material similar to grass. At Easter time, many of my bluebirds in public parks make their entire nest out of green Easter basket confetti! In general, most nests have a couple of small feathers in them. They usually have a piece or two of cellophane in the cup. They will also try to use artificial items like twine or monofilament fish line. I have found a few dead birds, both adults and young, tangled in nest material like this."

House Wren nests are mainly sticks, about two to three inches longs. They may line the very top of the nest with grass or hair. Often House Wrens will bring spider egg sacs into the nest.

House Sparrows nests are made from grass, but are very loosely made and will include a collection of a variety of trash, including: cigarette butts, string, feathers, and just about anything else they can pick up. One big clue is seed heads in the nest. The nest usually has no bottom and has a domed top.

Chickadee nests are usually made from moss and lined with hair or down, in general appear to be a quite comfortable place to be born.

Mice also use nest boxes and are more a threat to the monitor than to the bluebirds. There is a virus that can be acquired through mice droppings and therefore caution should be exercised when cleaning out a mouse nest. The mouse nest will usually consist of milkweed pods. Always stand up wind of the box when removing these nest and do so with a stick or brush (not with your hand).

As stated before other cavity nesting birds will use Bluebird nest boxes but none of these birds are a threat to bluebirds. In fact if another bird is using the nest box consider yourself lucky to be able to enjoy another species. Other species using your nest box might be an indication that the area you selected for this nest box is inappropriate for Bluebirds (NOTE: I'm not suggesting you remove this box, just that this is not Bluebird habitat).

I HAVE HEARD OF RECORD KEEPING, WHAT IS IT AND WHY IS IT DONE?

A record of what was observed at the nest box should be maintained for each box on the trail. This information should include dates, number of eggs laid, eggs hatched, birds fledged. This information is important to many Bluebird organizations including your state's Bluebird organization and the North American Bluebird Society. The organizations have forms to be filled out and sent in at the end of the Bluebird season. These organizations use this information to obtain trends on the breeding success of Bluebirds in their areas. Also it can help to determine which boxes work the best in certain areas. These records provide you with information as to what boxes are producing and which boxes are proving to be a problem with predators. At the end of the season it is comforting to know how many Bluebirds fledged from your boxes.

WHAT BLUEBIRD PREDATORS CAN I EXPECT TO FIND?

If you are using proper Bluebird nest boxes that will eliminate starlings from usurping Bluebirds from your nest boxes. That only eliminates one of the many predators. The two biggest predators are House Sparrows and House Wrens. These birds will usurp nest boxes, they have been known to break eggs, kill babies and adults, build nest over Bluebird nest, etc. In recent years much concern has been expressed about the effects of House Wrens on other nesting birds. House Wrens, unlike most other song birds, are territorial toward ALL other species, not just their own. Other predators include Bull snakes, Blowflies, ants, cats, raccoons, squirrels, etc. There are predator guards available to prevent some predation, other times such as with Blowflies and ants a specialized insecticide is needed like a natural pyrethrum insecticide IF and only IF blowflies are there in huge numbers and even then better to either lift up the nest, gently shake and brush out larva or make a new nest of fresh dry grass and replace the old one. I have known bluebirders to carry an old bluebird nest to be used in the replacement of a infested or extremely wet nest. CAUTION: tampering with the nest or possession of an old nest is technically illegal (yes, even by a bluebird trail monitor). Extreme caution is urged when using insecticides please use sparingly as they can prove harmful to the fledglings, adults, and bluebird monitors.

WILL BLUEBIRDS COME TO MY FEEDERS?

Bluebirds will come to your feeder if you provide the right kind of food. The Bluebird food of choice is insects. You can provide this food by giving them mealworms. Mealworms can be acquired from pet supply stores, nature stores, and by mail order. Occasionally Bluebirds will come to feeders for seed, but this is usually done when insects are in short supply.  Much like the other members of the Thrush family they will also eat small berries such as cranberries.

IS IT UNUSUAL FOR BLUEBIRDS TO OVER WINTER IN MY AREA?

In the winter the Southern states play host to a great number of Bluebirds that have migrated from the Northern states and Canada.  It seems to be more common for Bluebirds to over winter in the North.  The reasons are most likely very numerous.  Speculation includes improved numbers have caused more birds to over winter in their native nesting territories giving them an advantage when spring arrives to be first in the area.  This gives the males a better chance of getting a nest box in the best habitat.  This over wintering most likely is influenced by a greater number of humans providing the necessary ingredients to make survival possible.  That would include roost boxes and food.  It is probable that some of these over wintering birds will not survive the winter but just as likely many migrating birds do not survive the migration process.  It is likely that both migration and over wintering should help produce a more durable species in the long run.  Humans played a part in the decline of natural habitat for the birds and it is only logical that they provide an artificial habitat as a replacement.

 

WHERE CAN I GO FOR MORE HELP?
  1. There are a number of places to go for assistance for Bluebird problems and questions. The first thing I recommend is to get a good Bluebird book. The one I recommend is "Bluebird Trails-A Guide To Success" by Dorene Scriven. This was written by a bluebirder for bluebirders. It has nest descriptions, box types and plans, monitoring forms. In other words all the help you could ask for. Other good Bluebird books are "The Bluebird-How You Can Help It Fight for Survival" by Lawrence Zeleny of NABS and "Enjoying Bluebirds More" by Julie Zickefoose (published by Bird Watcher's Digest). Next find the name and address of your state Bluebird organization (see list at end of this FAQ). The state organization usually has people in your area that can help with box type selection for your area, specific predator suggestions, workshops, a newsletter, and often a state conference to discuss the many bluebirder related concerns. These groups are usually supported through donations or through your state non-game wildlife program. Another worthwhile Bluebird organization is The North American Bluebird Society (NABS). This organization exists on the dues and donations of it's members. It is devoted "...to increase the populations of the three species of Bluebirds on this continent." NABS publishes a quarterly journal (Bluebird), offers grants for Bluebird research projects, publishes results of Bluebird research, has a nationwide Bluebird Conference, etc.
  2. Ask questions, all the bluebirders I've ever met are always very happy to share their knowledge and Bluebird stories with anyone willing to listen. For bluebirders, Bluebirds become part of their life, almost a part of their family - let them show you their kids.
  3. The internet is gaining the attention of bluebirders.  Here is a list of Bluebird and other cavity nester web sites set up by individuals.

     

    Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

    Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
    Contact Me

     

    Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

    Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
    Contact Me

     

    Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

    Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
    Contact Me

     Personal Bluebird Pages

    Arlene Ripley's The Nest Box Joe Huber's Sparrow Control/Roosting Bluebirds
    Attracting Eastern Bluebirds by Ed Nied jr Bruce Johnson
    Bluebird Fancying by Terry Washburn Matt's Eastern Bluebird Page
    Phil's Bluebird Page Christy's Bluebird Project
    Linda Violett American Family Bluebird Trail Project
    Birds in spring, & other bird lover's resources! Bluebird Hollow: A Nestbox Trail in New Jersey
    Blue Ridge Mountain Bluebirds The Benz Bluebirds of Howard County
    UMBC BLUEBIRD TRAIL (University of Maryland Baltimore College)  Wendell Long 

    Richard & Diane Van Vleck - The Home Habitat

    Terry Whitworth Blowfly

    Green River Cemetery and Bluebird Sanctuary

    Joanne's Backyard

    George M. Radcliffe Bluebird Monitoring Program

    University of Georgia Institute of Ecology P.A. Gowaty Bluebirds

    Boyd Anthony's The Eastern Bluebird

    Bluebird Information & Awareness

    The Spark in Clarke

    Shirl's Bluebird Acres

    Davidson College - Dr. Mark Stanback

    Sarah's Purple Martins & Bluebird Trail

    Fawzi P. Emad

    http://www.elizaduck.com/nests.htm Nest/Egg ID

    Bluebird Nut

    Evelyn's Bluebird site for Elementary School Teachers

    Bluebird Groups

    Commercial Bluebird Pages

    The most complete list of bluebird links can be found here
     Bluebird Reference Guide

    01/03/2014

    Home
    Articles
    Nest Box Info
    Feeding Bluebirds
    Best Of...
    Gallery
    Forums/Mailing Lists
    Groups/Resources
    Personal Sites
    Commercial Sites
    Bluebirders Pictures
    Monitor Form
    Calls/Songs
    Miscellaneous
    Table Of Contents
    Maps
    First Egg 2000
    First Egg 2001
    First Egg 2002
    Over Winter 2001
    Over Winter 2002
    BB Survey
    CBC
    BB Ref Guide


    Maps


    Maps

 

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

 

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

 

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

Bluebird & other Cavity Nesting Groups

Most of these Bluebird organizations are non-profit volunteer run that need a tax deductible donation to answer inquiries to cover the administrative costs (information packets, newsletters, etc) of running their organization . Therefore please be considerate of their time and efforts in helping you with your bluebirding questions and problems.

North American Bluebird Society
PO Box 43
Miamiville, OH 45147
info@nabluebirdsociety.org

NABS Affiliates

Cornell's The Birdhouse Network
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road,
Ithaca, NY 14850
Phone: (607) 254-2416 or (800) 843-BIRD
birdhouse@cornell.edu
 
FAX: (607) 254-2415

Bluebird Groups, DNRs, Nature Centers. Etc., -  by State/Province

Alabama

Southern Alabama Birding Association
LA Bluebird Trail Project Manager - Tommy Pratt
1300 Cooper Avenue
Prattville, Alabama 36066
Phone: (334) 365-5671 
Email: saba@alaweb.com 
Alabama Cooperative Extension - Eastern Bluebird

Alberta, Canada

Calgary Area Bluebird Trails
c/o Don Stiles
20 Lake Wapta Rise SE
Calgary, Alberta T2J 2M9
Ellis Bird Farm
Box 2980
Lacombe, Alberta T0C 1S0
Mountain Bluebird Trails Conservation Group
c/o Bob Harrison, Sec/Treas
1725 Lakeside Road S.
Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3G9
Decreasing Raccoon Predation of Mountain Bluebirds From The Calgary Zoo

Alberta Fish & Wildlife

Arkansas
Bella Vista Bluebird Society
c/o Jim Janssen
27 Britten Circle
Bella Vista, AR 72714
Tel: 501-855-7277
Bermuda
Bermuda Audubon Society
Bermuda Bluebird and Longtail Society 
c/o Tommy Outerbridge
Box HS23, Harrington Sound
Bermuda, HSBX
British Columbia, Canada
Southern Interior Bluebird Trail Society
P.O. Box 494
Oliver, British Columbia V0H 1T0
t.tellier@shaw.ca
Western Bluebirds From Royal British Columbia Museum

Mountain Blue Bird From Columbia Valley (British Columbia)

California

California Bluebird Recovery Program
c/o Donald E. Yoder
2021 Ptarmigan Drive #1
Walnut Creek, CA 94595
e-mail cbrp@value.net

Sonoma Ecology Center
205 First Street West
Sonoma, CA 95476
(707) 996-9744
sec@vom.com
James Reserve Bluebird Nest Boxes Santa Clara Audubon Society
Western Bluebird Social Behavior:
A Long-Term Study Of A Marked Population
From Hastings Natural History Reservation
Western Bluebird From The California Dept of Fish & Game

Hastings Natural History Reservation

Western Bluebird From Biodiversity and Landscape Planning: Alternative Futures for the Region of Camp Pendleton, California
Colorado
Colorado Bluebird Project
Audubon Society of Greater Denver
9308 S. Wadsworth Blvd.
Littleton, CO 80128
303-973-9530
fax 303-973-1038
bluebirdproject@denveraudubon.org
Western Bluebird From Colorado Partners In Flight / Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory
Connecticut
Eastern Bluebird From Wildlife in Conneticut Bluebirds from Woodstock Conservation
Florida
Indian River Audubon Society (status unknown)
C/O Judy Dryja
888 Bartel Place
Rockledge Florida 32955
Florida Fish & Wildlife
Florida Bluebird Society
P.O. Box 1086
Penney Farms, FL 32079

Email: floridabluebirdsociety@yahoo.com
 
Georgia
Bluebirds Over Georgia, Inc.
5858 Silver Ridge Dr.
Stone Mountain, GA 30087
e-mail fgsawyer@mindspring.com
Eastern Bluebirds From Georgia Wildlife Web

Bluebird Nesting Box Plans From Georgia DNR

Idaho

Our Bluebird Ranch
152 N 200 E.
Blackfoot ID 83221
Tel: 208-782-9676
E-mail: pjbarnes@micron.net

Rocky Mountain Blues
c/o David Richmond
HC67 Box 680
Clayton ID 83227
Tel: 208-838-2431
E-mail: fowest@custertel.

Illinois
JoDaviess County, IL Bluebird Recovery Program
(a Natural Area Guardians program)

c/o Grace Storch
15 Cedar Rim Trail
Galena, IL 61036
E-mail: jbw@galenalink.com
Illinois Bluebird Project
PO Box 2418
Danville IL 61834
Illinois Audubon Society

The Bluebird Ladies - Salt Fork River Forest Preserve From Champaign
County Forest Preserve District's

Eastern Bluebirds: Effects of Environment on Reproductive Strategies From The Illinois Dept of Natural Resources

Indiana
Indiana Bluebird Society
P O Box 134
Rensselaer IN 47978-0134
Ken Murray
219 866 3081
email ibs@indianabluebirdsociety.org
Brown County Bluebird Society
c/o Dan Sparks
P.O. Box 660
Nashville, IN 47448
Tel: 812-988-1876
Fax: 812-342-3820
E-mail: b4bluebirds@yahoo.com
Eastern Bluebird From Chipper Woods Bird Observatory Eastern Bluebird From Greenwood High School (Indiana)  Bird Identification
Iowa

Bluebirds of Iowa Restoration
c/o Jaclyn Hill
2946 Ubben Avenue
Ellsworth, IA 50075-7554
Tel: 515-836-4579
E-mail: hillhome@netins.net

Johnson County Songbird Project
c/o Jim Walters
1033 E. Washington
Iowa City IA 52240-5248
Tel: 319-466-1134
E-mail: james-walters@uiowa.edu
Eastern Bluebird From the Iowa DNR
Kansas

Kansas State University

bullet

Increasing Eastern Bluebirds in Kansas

bullet

Bluebird Hybrids

Kentucky

Kentucky Bluebird Society
c/o Bob Ivy
P.O. Box 3425
Paducah, KY 42002
Tel: 270-442-1712
E-mail: kybluebirds@hcis.net

Louisiana

Louisiana Bayou Bluebird Society

1222 Cook Rd.
Delhi, La.  71232

  Manitoba

The Friends of the Bluebirds
3011 Park Ave.
Brandon, MB CANADA R7B 2K3
Tel: 204-727-5102
Fax: 204-728-7346
e-mail: smitha@brandonu.ca
Contact: Ann Smith
Maryland

Maryland Bluebird Society

Calvert Bluebird Council
c/o John Zyla
49476 Porney's Overlook Rd.
Ridge, MD 20680
Hank Stanton (status unknown)
MOS Howard County Boost Bluebird Program
8831 Manahan Drive
Ellicott City, MD 21043
410.750.0360
Maryland DNR - Creating a Wild Backyard Eastern Bluebirds Massachusetts Massachusetts Bluebird Association
Contact:  Haleya Priest
89 Pulpit Hill Rd., Amherst, MA  01002
Tel: 413-549-3937
Fax: 413-549-2901
E-mail:  MaBlue@gis.net
Nashua River Watershed Association
592 Main Street, Groton, MA 01450
Voice Phone Number: (978) 448-0299
Fax: (978) 448-0941
E-mail Address: nrwa@ma.ultranet.com 
Michigan Michigan Bluebird Society
%Maynard Sumner
5240 Roberts Dr.
Flint, MI 48506-1554
Phone: 810-736-7060
Fax: 810-736-7060
E-mail: m-r-sumner@juno.com 
University of Michigan bulletBluebirds On Our Shoulder bulletEastern Bluebird  Bluebirds From Michigan DNR

Minnesota Bluebird Recovery Program
(Audubon Chapter of Minneapolis)
c/o Dorene H. Scriven
P.O. Box 3801
Minneapolis MN 55403
Tel: 612-922-4586
Fax: same, call first.
E-mail: bbrp@att.net
Mississippi Mississippi Bluebirds
192 County Road 457
Calhoun City, MS 38916
622-628-1625
Tena Taylor
Montana Mountain Bluebird Trails, Inc.
Robert Niebuhr
600 Central Ave. Suite 320
Great Falls, MT 59401
Tel: 406-453-5143
Fax: 406-453-3840
E-mail: blubrdbob@prodigy.net
Mountain Bluebird From Visit Montana Missouri

Poplar Bluff Garden Club
2026 Snider Rd.
Poplar Bluff, MO 63901
573-686-3251
jkduncan@imsinternet.net

Nebraska Bluebirds Across Nebraska
c/o Connie Finley
6732 K Rd.
Nebraska City NE 68410
Tel: 402-873-7550
E-mail: bbcdf@hotmail.com
Eastern Bluebird Nestbox Plan From Nebraska Game and Parks Nevada Mountain Bluebird From The Nevada Wildlife Federation New Hampshire New Hampshire Bluebird Conspiracy
c/o Bruce Burdett
P.O. Box 103
Sunapee NH 03782
E-mail: blueburd@srnet.com
New Jersey

Ending the Bluebird Blues From US Fish & Wildlife New Jersey Office

New York New York State Bluebird Society (NYSBS)
c/o James Kunz
454 Ashley Road
Maine NY 13802
Tel: 607-862-3410
E-mail: webmaster@nysbs.com
Broome County Nestbox Network (status unknown)
c/o Joseph R. Sedlacek
28 Farr Ave.
Johnson City, NY 13790
Schoharie County Bluebird Society
c/o Kevin Berner
SUNY Cobleskill
Cobleskill NY 12043
Tel: 518-255-5252
E-mail: bernerkl@cobleskill.edu
Eastern Bluebird From South Fork Natural Historical Society (New York)

New Mexico Wilson Bulletin Library
at the University of New Mexico
 

North Carolina North Carolina Bluebird Society
Box 4191
Greensboro, NC 27404
Rutherford County Bluebird Club
P.O. Box 247
Ellenboro, NC 28040
Davidson College (North Carolina) bulletNest Site Fidelity in Eastern Bluebirds: Predator or Parasite Avoidance bulletBody Condition within Eastern Bluebird Pairs: Cause or Consequence of Mate Choice North Dakota Attracting Bluebirds and Other Cavity Nesting Songbirds in North Dakota from the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center Bluebird Recovery Project
North Dakota Nongame Wildlife Program
100 North Bismarck Expressway
Bismarck, ND 58501
North Central Bluebird Recovery Team
NDSU Extension Service Room
181 Hultz Hall
North Dakota State University
Fargo, ND 58105

Nova Scotia Eastern Bluebird From Birds of Nova Scotia

Ohio Ohio Bluebird Society
c/o Doug LeVasseur
20680 Township Road #120
Senecaville OH 43780
Email: ohbluebird@sssnet.com
Eastern Bluebird From Ohio History Central

Oklahoma Oklahoma Bluebird Society
Marion Liles
5656 So. 161 W. Ave.
Sand Springs, OK 74063
Tel: 918-241-2473
Fax: 918-699-3358
Email: sialia@worldnet.att.net
Eastern Bluebird From Birds Of Oklahoma

Ontario, Canada Ontario Eastern Bluebird Society
2-165 Green Valley Drive
Kitchener, Ontario N2P 1K3
Willow Beach Field Naturalist (status unknown)
c/o Hazel Bird
Box 45
Harwood, Ontario K0K 2H0

Oregon Prescott Western Bluebird Recovery Project
c/o Patricia Johnston
7717 S.W. 50th
Portland, OR 97219
bluebird@pacifier.com
Audubon Society of Corvallis
Elsie Eltzroth
6980 N.W. Cardinal Rd.
Corvallis OR 97330
Tel: 541-745-7806
E-mail: eltzroth@peak.org
Western Bluebird & Tree Swallow From Rainier Audubon Society

Quebec, Canada Comit� de conservation de merle-bleu de l'Est (status unknown)
Club des ornithologues amateurs du Saguenay/Lac-Saint-Jean Inc.
C.P. 1265, Jonquiere (Quebec)
G7S 4K8, CANADA

Pennsylvania Bluebird Society of Pennsylvania
PO Box 756
Mechanicsburg, PA 17055
Tel: 717 695-0700
E-mail: kcbsp@aol.com
Birdwatchers Alert! Results of An Eastern Bluebird Nesting Survey From The MoshannonGroup of the Pennsylvania Chapter of Sierra Group

Pennsylvania Wildlife #3: Managing Habitat for Eastern Bluebirds From Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences

Rhode Island

South Carolina

Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History South Dakota South Dakota Bluebirds From Northern State University

Tennessee Benton County Bluebird Society of Tennessee
155 Post Oak Ave.
Camden, TN 38320
dmccue@usit.net
Tennessee Bluebird Trails
P.O. Box 190
Mt. Juliet, TN 37121

Texas Texas Bluebird Society
PO Box 40868
Austin TX 78704
www.texasbluebirdsociety.org
 
Brazos Bend State Park

Eastern Bluebirds From Visit Wimberly

Eastern Bluebird From The Tennessee Aquarium and IMAX 3D Theater

Eastern Bluebird From Passport To Texas Eastern Bluebird From Texas Parks & Wildlife Eastern Bluebird From Birds of the Upper Texas Coast

Vermont Bluebirds Across Vermont
c/o National Audubon Society
Box 9, Fiddlers Green
Waitsfield, VT 05673

Virginia Virginia Bluebird Society
Julie A. Kutruff: jkutruff@aol.com
Anne Little: aglmkt@erols.com
3403 Carly Lane
Woodbridge, VA 22192
Tel: 703-730-1729
E-mail: virginiabluebirds@home.com
Virginia Dept. of Forestry - Eastern Bluebirds

Eastern Bluebird From Winging It - Birds of the Blue Ridge

Washington Cascadia Bluebird and Purple Martin Society
Dr. Richard Pietro
1537 Lakeway Place
Bellingham WA 98226
360-738-2153

Wisconsin Bluebird Restoration Association of Wisconsin
RT 1, Box 137, Akron Ave.
Plainfield, WI 54966

c/o Carol McDaniel
14953 St Rd 23
Darlington, WI 53530
608-776-3379
lafayettecountybluebirdsociety@yahoo.com

Eastern Bluebird From Environmental Education For Kids Wisconsin DNR

Other Cavity Nesting Birds Purple Martin Conservation Association
Edinboro University of Pennsylvania
Edinboro, PA 16444
phone: (814) 734-4422
fax: (814) 734-5803
pcma@edinboroo.edu
 
Purple Martin Society
The Purple Martin Society, NA
7510 Farmingdale Drive, Suite 107
Darien, IL 60561
info@purplemartins.com
 
The Electronic Nuthatch Tree Swallow Nesting Projects, Inc. The Chickadee Web

Personal Bluebird Pages

Commercial Bluebird Pages

The most complete list of bluebird links can be found here
 Bluebird Reference Guide

 

01/03/2014

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Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

 

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

 

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995

Including the Internet's original Bluebird FAQ & featuring Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified
Contact Me

Commercial Bluebird Pages

Nest boxes, Traps, Feeders & other Accessories
In addition to the below nest box suppliers most Bluebird organizations have Bluebird boxes, accessories, and decorations for sale to help offset administrative costs of their organization.
ABirdsWorld.com
877-725-1965
Ahlgren Construction Company
12989 Otchipwe Avenue North
Stillwater, MN 55082
email Givahoot@aol.com
Bluebird Love
P.O. Box 872
Cochranton, PA 16314
(814) 425-2388
info@bluebird-love.com 
Steve Gilbertson
35900 Dove Street,
Aitkin, MN 56431
(218) 927-1953
John Holm
2014 Avenue G
Gothenburg, NE 69138
SparrowTraps.net
Home of the Deluxe Repeating Sparrow Trap
uncleblaine@sparrowtraps.net
J & J Woodcrafters Home Page
Calvin Hyer
120 Red Oak Court
P.O. Box 1116
Byron, Georgia 31008
(912) 956-3607
clhyer@hom.net 
Finch Homes for Bluebirds
PO Box 699, Bailey, NC 27807
fax: 252-235-2411
1-800-245-4662
finchnursery@bbnp.com
 
For The Birds
Colton E.S. Oliphant
edo@onysd.wednet.edu
PO Box 363
Onalaska, Wa 98570
Real Bird Homes
Gary Springer
PO Box 523
617 Sheperd Rd.
Carnesville, GA 30521
springer@alltel.net
Van Ert Enterprises
Floyd & Marty Van Ert
39755 Highway 92
Carson, Iowa 51525-4275
712-484-3479
fvanert@aol.com
 
Wild Bird Habitat Store
4711 Huntington
Lincoln, NE 68504
(402) 464-4055
A Nest Of Bluebirds Paul Busswell's For The Birds
Ren� Lepage Hironbec GardenBuilt.com
The Backyard Bird Company
27316 Oruro Drive
Punta Gorda, Florida 33983
941-764-5880
kdevries@backyardbird.com
Bird Guardian
Bluebird Gift Shop J. C. Williams Birdhouses
Jeff Williams
2305-C Ashland St. #116
Ashland OR 97520
541-890-8863
email: birdhouses@peppermintplayhouse.com
Website: http://peppermintplayhouse.com/birdhouses
Laurance Sawyer's
Bluebird Housing
P.O. Box 207
East Ellijay, GA 30539

195 Avory Lane
Ellijay, GA 30540

706.276.7888
toll free 1.888.835.1207
email bluebirdhousing@ellijay.com
www.bluebirdhousing.com
Songbird Garden
P.O. Box 463
Cape Fair, MO 65624
417-538-2990
Wildbird-Shop Your Bird Oasis

Mealworms and Feeding

Grubco
PO Box 15001
Hamilton, Ohio 45015-0001
1-800-222-3563
Fax 1-888-222-3563
sales@grubco.com 
New York Mealworms
7 Germaine Street � Glen Cove, NY 11542
(516)759-3538 � Fax (516)674-0543
info@nyworms.com 
Rainbow Mealworms
126 E. Spruce Street
Compton, CA 90220
1-800-777-9676
rainbowm@earthlink.net
 
Sunshine Meal Worms
(800) 322-1100
(503) 873-8989
Fax: (503) 873-3767
sales@sunshinemealworms.com 

Wildlife Art (at least some bluebird related)

A Passion for Collectibles
PO Box 520
Quitman,TX 75783-0520

Ed Bierly's Bluebird Home Page
8833 Lake Hill Drive
Lorton, VA 22079
bluebird@wsd.com
 

Unique Designs By Fitzpatrick  
Ron Austing Castlebury Wild Bird Photography

Miscellaneous (but mostly informational)

Bluebirds at Bird Watcher's Digest  

Bluebirds at wildbird.com

Eastern Bluebird From Birding.com

Bluebirds at Fifth Day Creations

Bluebirds at birdgoods.com

Bluebirds From Discovery.com

Eastern Bluebird From Shop Maine
Western Bluebird From Shop Maine

Eastern Bluebird at Neartica.com

Bluebirds - Everyone's Favorite at Birdzilla.com

Eastern Bluebird From Slivoski.com

A Birds Home

 

Bluebird Groups

Personal Bluebird Pages

The most complete list of bluebird links can be found here
 Bluebird Reference Guide

01/03/14

Home
Articles
Nest Box Info
Feeding Bluebirds
Best Of...
Gallery
Forums/Mailing Lists
Groups/Resources
Personal Sites
Commercial Sites
Bluebirders Pictures
Monitor Form
Calls/Songs
Miscellaneous
Table Of Contents
Maps
First Egg 2000
First Egg 2001
First Egg 2002
Over Winter 2001
Over Winter 2002
BB Survey
CBC
BB Ref Guide


Maps


Maps

 

The following  individuals, books, and materials were useful to me in creating this FAQ: bulletBluebird Trails-A Guide to Success by Dorene Scriven bulletBluebirds Across Nebraska Information Booklet bulletSiala-A Quarterly Journal of The North American Bluebird Society bulletEnjoying Bluebirds More by Julie Zickefoose bulletBluebirds Across Nebraska-Quarterly Newsletter bulletMinnesota Bluebird Recovery Program-Quarterly Newsletter bulletDorene Scriven deserves more credit for this FAQ than I can put in words, her book and critique have proved invaluable bulletThe following individuals have also offered ideas for the FAQ for which I am grateful: bulletKeith Kridler bulletDick Purvis bulletLinda Violett

 

This is the original Bluebird FAQ on the Internet.  This FAQ was here before I had a web site.  In fact I think there was only one Bluebird web site on the internet at the time and that was  Phil Wagner of Minnesota's.  Things have changed a lot for those who bluebird the internet.  There is more involvement by bluebirders at every level.  There are times when they don't agree, but you can be sure that the goal of every bluebirder is to help all who choose to bluebird to have the best experience possible, and for that experience to aid not just bluebirds but for every native cavity nester in North America.

I am solely responsible for the content of this FAQ. It has been prepared for the use and enjoyment of new and experienced bluebirders everywhere.
Please send all comments to me via:
E-mail at bluebirdbox@cox.net (please when sending me mail include a subject such as bluebirds or other so I don't throw away your mail)

Snail Mail to
Jim McLochlin
9521 Burdette Cir
Omaha, NE 68134
I grant permission for this FAQ to be posted, printed, etc as long as the entire document is kept intact. If quoting from the this FAQ is desired please give me credit.

date of last change 01/03/14

 

Home
Articles
Nest Box Info
Feeding Bluebirds
Best Of...
Gallery
Forums/Mailing Lists
Groups/Resources
Personal Sites
Commercial Sites
Bluebirders Pictures
Monitor Form
Calls/Songs
Miscellaneous
Table Of Contents
Maps
First Egg 2000
First Egg 2001
First Egg 2002
Over Winter 2001
Over Winter 2002
BB Survey
CBC
BB Ref Guide


Maps


Maps

Home
Articles
Nest Box Info
Feeding Bluebirds
Best Of...
Gallery
Forums/Mailing Lists
Groups/Resources
Personal Sites
Commercial Sites
Bluebirders Pictures
Monitor Form
Calls/Songs
Miscellaneous
Table Of Contents
Maps
First Egg 2000
First Egg 2001
First Egg 2002
Over Winter 2001
Over Winter 2002
BB Survey
CBC
BB Ref Guide