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Click to go to Audubon Society of Omaha Home Page Audubon Society of OmahaEastern Bluebird

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995
Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified

Nestbox -Hole Restrictors or Hole Guards

In addition to Messages that have appeared in the Bluebird Mailing Lists on this topic, the following are on the Audubon Society of Omaha website: 


Subj: hole restrictor
Date: 7/6/99 6:56:21 AM Central Daylight Time
From: kridler"at"1Starnet.com (Keith & Sandy Kridler)
Sender: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Reply-to: kridler"at"1Starnet.com (Keith & Sandy Kridler)
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu (BLUEBIRD-L)

Keith Kridler Mt. Pleasant, Texas 80*F and 95% humidity "at" 6 AM

You should use a 1" round hole restrictor (use this on slot holes also) so that the young can't get their wings into the edge of the hole and damage their flight feathers. If young can safely fly to trees then they are not fledging prematurely. You didn't mention if they could fly, can they?

Depending on day length, amount and quality of food and air temperature (aids digestion in young 1-6 days old) will drastically alter the amount of"days" to fledge. If young are found crawling around at the base of a pole with almost no primary flight feathers then yes they have fledged prematurely, if they can fly 50' (many young should be able to fly in excess of 150' on first flight) or so and fall out of a tree then they are about on schedule for leaving and will be impossible to keep in a box without a hole restrictor. KK


Subj: removing hole restrictor
Date: 7/6/99 10:03:03 PM Central Daylight Time
From: kridler"at"1Starnet.com (Keith & Sandy Kridler)
Sender: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Reply-to: kridler"at"1Starnet.com (Keith & Sandy Kridler)
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu (BLUEBIRD-L)

Keith Kridler

OHHH good point Dave! If a person needs to add a hole restrictor to a box where the young are way too young to fly but have left the nestbox for some reason. You should add the restrictor for a couple hours or just over night until they calm down then remove it. If they are able to leave through the entrance hole then they can go to the hole for food. The hungriest one will get fed. Nest cleaning will resume the next day.

Bird banders need to sex the young at banding for their records. About the 13th day you can tell the males from the females by the amount of blue in the feathers at this time many are able to exit the nestbox after being handled. A 1" round hole restrictor placed over the entrance will keep them in the box for a couple hours until they calm down. I have seen this method used on hundreds of nestlings with no lasting damage and no premature fledglings! KK


Subj: Re: What size restrictor to keep nestlings?
Date: 7/6/99 10:06:27 PM Central Daylight Time
From: scriv001"at"tc.umn.edu (Dorene Scriven)
Sender: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Reply-to: scriv001"at"tc.umn.edu
To: mcwrigh"at"nppd.com, BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu

from mcwrigh"at"nppd.com:

As I approached a slot box this year, the parents made a fuss and the babies
left. After the first two left, I covered the slot with my hand and finally
realized it was hopeless to try to keep the last three inside and the only
thing I could do was to aim the box at a tree for them to fly to which they
did. Now I want to carry a hole restrictor and a slot restrictor to add if
I need to. Can fledglings escape through a 1-1/4 inch restrictor I have for
possible use if I ever want to attach it for chickadees? Can babies be fed
through a 1 inch restrictor? Would a one inch slot keep fledglings inside?

Merlin Wright at Nemaha county NE 40*30'N, 95*45'W


-----Original
rescue them. Don't worry about disturbing them, but you might want to
fasten something across the hole prior to turning the box so they
won't be frightened into exiting before the box is turned.
-Dorene Scriven
Bluebird Recovery Program of Minnesota

We have a hole restrictor (for a Peterson box) described in our new book, but you could just tack on something (piece of wood?, carboard) to make the slot or hole smaller. I am not sure about the 1&1/4" - I think I would make it no more than one & 1/8" which Dick Peterson has tested. Even 1 inch would be o.k. Be sure to remove it as soon as you think they SHOULD fledge. And of course this means, though the parents can drop food in, they can't carry out the fecal sack.You must watch the box and be sure the parents are continuing to feed thru a 1" opening. It is probably better to let them prefledge than have them in the box without the parents feeding. Even a piece of strong tape temporarily across the opening, or a piece of monofilament line, that could be pulled off later without exciting them to fledge might work.

-Dorene Scriven


From: LauraSue14"at"aol.com
Date: Sat, 18 May 2002 16:24:25 EDT
Subject: restrictor holes
To: Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu

Hello All,
I'm sure some or all of you might have read the post from Donna, (my neighbor and friend) here in Marlborough, CT (Observations, Hypotheses, and Ruminations). This was and is a learning experience for us both as we have not had to deal with HOSP up till now in our backyards.

We have a question for you. We both have PVC nestboxes as well as NABS style, Peterson, etc. boxes. We need to figure out how to install a restrictor hole on the PVC, (she has a Van Ert and I have a Gilbertson). I searched the Best of Bluebird-L and wasn't able to find any reference to this. Does anyone have any good ideas?
Thanks,
Laura, Marlborough, CT


From: "susan"at"changeswithin.com" changes"at"sunlink.net
To: LauraSue14"at"aol.com, Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: restrictor holes
Date: Sat, 18 May 2002 18:01:26 -0400

Laura and Donna

I'm sure there are better solutions but this one is free, quick and simple ... How about using the plastic from a soda or water bottle?

First, cut the bottle up into more manageable sizes... say 3" square. In the center, measure out and then draw the size circle you need ... I'd use a tool called a divider. (remember them from geometry class?) cut out the hole with a razor blade knife. Voila'! Hole restrictor.

You could either Velcro the hole restrictor on ... or glue it ... but of course once you glue it ... it won't be temporary.

I truly enjoyed Donna's post!!! It was extremely well written and *very* helpful.

I find it ironic that today I can "add" something to that wonderful email ... Don't ever try to hardboil HOSP eggs by placing them in a bowl of water in the microwave .... it only takes *30 seconds* (I sware) on high power to blow them up. Boil the water, remove from heat, drop eggs in and let them sit a few minutes.

Ohhhh, the things we sometimes need to learn the hard way.

good luck!
Susan in central PA


From: "Fawzi P. Emad femad <at> fpemad <dot> com
To: LauraSue14"at"aol.com, Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: restrictor holes
Date: Mon, 20 May 2002 08:12:55 -0400

Here is a way to do it, I am sure there are other ways too. Get some of the PVC 4" drainage pipe, the same as the PVC-box is made from. Cut a piece shorter than the box, about 3" will do fine. Carefully drill a hole of the size you want (this may be hard to do unless you use a round piece of wood to hold the PVC from bending as you apply the drill or drill-press to make the hole.) Now make a slit in the PVC opposite to the hole. Open the PVC along the slit and slide it around the box lining up your restrictor hole with the original hole. The spring of the PVC will hold the restrictor in place.

Though I have not tested this method, I imagine it will work. If you do try it, please let us know if it works for you. Thanks,

Fawzi

Fawzi Emad in Laytonsville, Maryland
femad"at"comcast.net

----- Original Message -----
From: LauraSue14"at"aol.com
To: Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu
Sent: Saturday, May 18, 2002 4:24 PM
Subject: restrictor holes

...


From: Afinechef"at"aol.com
Date: Fri, 24 May 2002 08:41:08 EDT
Subject: Restrictor Hole Size for Cavity Nesters
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu

from Donna in Marlborough, CT

Hi List,

After my run-in with the rogue male HOuse SParrow last week, several of you kindly emailed me that one way to have protected the white-breasted nuthatches under siege would have been to slap on a restrictor hole too small for the HOSP but big enough for the nuthatches. Some folks told me to use a 1" restrictor plate, but others told me they were sure that would have been too small for the nuthatches.

Is there a resource that I could access that would tell me what size entrance holes are appropriate for different cavity nesters?

Please reply to the List as several people have expressed interest in the answer.

Thanks,
Donna in Marlborough, CT


From: "BONNIE A. YEAGER" dement"at"frognet.net
To: Afinechef"at"aol.com
Cc: bluebird-l"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: Restrictor Hole Size for Cavity Nesters
Date: Sat, 25 May 2002 08:14:42 -0400

Donna,
The information in the table below should answer your question about entrance hole sizes for different types of cavity nesters.

Fred Yeager,
SE, OH
Nesting Habitat and Birdhouse Requirements

Species
Nesting Habitat
Box
Height
Hole Size

Eastern Bluebird
open field or lawn; orchards; open, rural country with scattered trees and low or sparse ground cover; Mountain and Western bluebirds will also use deciduous and coniferous forest edges; entrance hole should face open field, preferring east, north, south, and then west facing directions
3-6 feet
1 1/2" diameter

Western Bluebird
1 1/2" diameter

Mountain Bluebird
1 9/16" diameter

American Kestrel
pastures, fields, meadows, or orchards with mowed or grazed vegetation; place boxes on lone trees in fields, on trees along edges of woodlots, and on farm buildings
10-30 feet
3" diameter

Wood Duck
forested wetlands or near marshes, swamps, and beaver ponds; place boxes in deciduous trees, 30-100 feet from the nearest water, spaced
600 feet apart
6-30 feet
4" wide, 3" high

Eastern Screech Owl
forests, parks, woodland clearings, forest edges, wooded stream edges, under a tree limb. Add 2"-3" of wood shavings
10-30 feet
3" round north facing;

Western Screech Owl
lower elevations, forests, parks, woodland clearings, forest edges, deserts, wooded stream edges, under a tree limb. Add 2"-3" of wood shavings
10-30 feet
3" round; north facing

Great Crested Flycatcher
deciduous or mixed deciduous-coniferous forests, forest edges, woodlots, orchards, parks, on post or tree at forest edge
3-20 feet
1 1/4" round

Northern Flicker
pastures, groves, woodlots, orchards, fields, meadows, woodland clearings, forest edges, urban parks, on pole or tree at forest edge or along fence rows bordering crop fields; box should be completely filled with wood chips or shavings
6-30 feet
2 1/2" round; southeast facing

Tree Swallow
open fields near water, expansive open areas, marshes, meadows, wooded swamps; on a post in open areas near tree or fence, 30-100 feet apart
5-15 feet
1 3/8" round east facing

Violet-green Swallow
open or broken deciduous or mixed deciduous-coniferous forests, wooded canyons, edges of dense forest
9-15 feet
1 3/8" round

Purple Martin
broad open areas (meadows, fields, farmland, swamps, ponds, lakes, rivers) with unobstructed space for foraging on flying insects; there should be no trees or buildings within 40 feet of the martin pole in any direction; houses should be painted white
10-15 feet
2 1/8" round

Tufted Titmouse
deciduous forest, thick timber stands, woodland clearings, forest edges, woodlots, riparian and mesquite habitats; spaced one box per 8 acres, hole should face away from prevailing wind
5-15 feet
1 1/4" round

Black-capped Chickadee
forests, woodlots, and yards with mature hardwood trees, forest edges, meadows, area should receive 40-60% sunlight, spaced one box per 10 acres, hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
5-15 feet
1 1/8" round

Carolina Chickadee
forests, woodlots, and yards with mature hardwood trees, forest edges, meadows, area should receive 40-60% sunlight, hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
5-15 feet
1 1/8" round

Mountain Chickadee
coniferous forests, forest edges, woodland clearings; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
5-15 feet
1 1/8" round

Chestnut-backed Chickadee
coniferous forests, mixed deciduous-coniferous forests, forest edges, woodlands, thickets, burned areas, often near streams; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
5-15 feet
1 1/8" round

White-breasted Nuthatch
deciduous woodlands, mature forests, woodlots, near open areas, forest edges, orchards, often near water; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
5-20 feet
1 3/8" round

Red-breasted Nuthatch
mixed coniferous-deciduous forests, shrub lands, swamps, farmlands, = suburban parks; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
5-15 feet
1 1/4" round

House Wren
variety of habitats, farmland, openings, open forests, forest edges, shrub lands, suburban gardens, parks, backyards; near trees or tall shrubs
5-10 feet
1 1/4" round

Carolina Wren
forests with thick underbrush, forest edges, woodland clearings, open forests, shrub lands, suburban gardens, parks, backyards; near trees or tall shrubs
5-10 feet
1 1/2" round

Prothonotary Warbler
lowland hardwood forests subject to flooding, stagnant water, swamps, ponds, marshes, streams, flooded river valleys, wet bottomlands; box should be over or near water
2-12 feet
1 1/4" round

Hooded Merganser
quiet, shallow, clear water pools surrounded by or near the edge of deciduous woods: small forest pools, ponds, swamps; add 3" of wood shavings; add ladder under inside of entrance hole for young to climb out
6-25 feet
3" high by 4" wide horizontal oval

Ash-throated Flycatcher
chaparral, mesquite thickets, oak scrub, dry plains spotted with trees or cacti, deserts, and open deciduous and riparian woodlands
3-20 feet
1 3/4" round

Brown-headed Nuthatch
open stands of pine-hardwood forests, clearings scattered with dead trees, forest edges, burned areas, cypress swamps
5-20 feet
1 1/4" round

Fred Yeager,
SE, OH
----- Original Message -----
From: Afinechef"at"aol.com
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Sent: Friday, May 24, 2002 8:41 AM
Subject: Restrictor Hole Size for Cavity Nesters

...


From: "Keith & Sandy Kridler" kridler"at"1starnet.com
To: "BLUEBIRD-L" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: restrictor hole size for cavity nesters
Date: Sat, 25 May 2002 07:45:40 -0500

Keith Kridler Mt. Pleasant, Texas Thanks Fred for sending this list! The Great Crested Flycatcher hole should be 1&3/4" as I believe the 1&1/4" is too small according to all the other books and the Brown headed nuthatch could be reduced to 1&1/8" to keep the House Sparrows out. Add House Sparrows and flying squirrels at 1&1/4" round and European Starling at 1&5/8" round. KK


From: "BONNIE A. YEAGER" dement"at"frognet.net
To: kridler"at"1starnet.com
Cc: bluebird-l"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: restrictor hole size for cavity nesters
Date: Sat, 25 May 2002 11:41:09 -0400

Keith,
I don't remember the Web address of the table I sent to BB-L. Also, I have no idea, about the accuracy of the data in the table. There are many more tables of information besides the one I sent. I only sent one table because I didn't want to overwhelm BB-L. If I get a chance, I will try to find the source and post the Web address to BB-L so everyone can peruse all of the tables.

Fred Yeager,
SE, OH
----- Original Message -----
From: "Keith & Sandy Kridler" kridler"at"1starnet.com
To: "BLUEBIRD-L" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2002 8:45 AM
Subject: Re: restrictor hole size for cavity nesters

...


From: "Marysue" mamakitticat"at"earthlink.net
To: "BLUEBIRD-L" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: RE: restrictor hole size for cavity nesters
Date: Sat, 25 May 2002 12:33:02 -0400

http://birds.cornell.edu/birdhouse/bird_bios/refrchart.html 

Above is the address. I'm not meaning to step on toes by answering this. It was easy to find the address by clicking on link to a bird's name ;-)

Marysue
In The South
NE GA
 

I don't remember the Web address of the table I sent to BB-L.

...


From: "BONNIE A. YEAGER" dement"at"frognet.net
To: bluebird-l"at"cornell.edu
Cc: kridler"at"1starnet.com
Subject: Tables of Data on Cavity Nesters
Date: Sat, 25 May 2002 12:57:35 -0400

Keith,
I found the Web address of the data table on entrance hole sizes that I sent to BB-L yesterday.
The link is - http://www.aplus-birdhouses.com/birdhouse_info/nesting_habitat_and_birdhouse.htm . This Web site shows a number of data tables about a variety of  topics relating to cavity nesters. I like the way the data is listed in a handy and concise tabulated format.

Just remember, I didn't create these data tables and, as such, I'm not responsible for the accuracy of their data.
Have fun!

Fred Yeager,
SE, OH


From: "BONNIE A. YEAGER" dement"at"frognet.net
To: bluebird-l"at"cornell.edu
Cc: kridler"at"1starnet.com
Subject: New Link to Cavity Nesters Data Tables
Date: Sat, 25 May 2002 13:14:46 -0400

Keith,
The first Web address I sent doesn't include all of the data tables. Try http://birds.cornell.edu/birdhouse/bhbasics/refrchart.html . This is the original source of the data table I sent to BB-L yesterday.
As they say, haste makes waste!

Fred Yeager,
SE, OH


From: Mark Powell [mailto:mlppc2"at"alltel.net]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 9:46 AM
Subject: Bluebird house openings

To All:
I have several successful bluebird houses but I also have a few that are used by other birds.
This past weekend, while cleaning the houses for this year's bluebirds, I also found two of my bluebird houses occupied by flying squirrels.
I also noticed several of my bluebird houses had entrances that had been widened considerably. In years past I have simply replaced the fronts on any bluebird houses that were damaged by woodpeckers, cat squirrels, etc.
I would like to find something that is relatively inexpensive to put around the openings that will prevent animals and other birds from enlarging the entrance hole on my bluebird houses. I have searched the internet for sheet metal flanges or other similar products that I can purchase but have come up empty. Does anyone have a suggestion about what can be used around bluebird house openings and where can I purchase it (or should I just be content to make my own entrance protectors)?
Oh yeah, because flying squirrels were staying in two of my bluebird houses I just finished my first flying squirrel house (two chamber) and will put it far enough away from my bluebird house to minimize competition (hopefully) between bluebirds and flying squirrels yet still keep both happy.

Mark Powell
Norman Park, Georgia


From: Evelyn Cooper [mailto:emcooper"at"bayou.com]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 10:03 AM
Subject: RE: Bluebird house openings

I took a quick look on our website www.labayoubluebirdsociety.org and in the links section, the very first one at the top "Anything Bluebirds" has a metal guard to fit over the hole for $1.95. I did not look any further, but there is another link or two on there you might look at.

Evelyn Cooper
Delhi, LA


From: Chris&Crystal Hill [mailto:crystaljhill"at"msn.com]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 10:04 AM
Subject: Re: Bluebird house openings

Metal Hole Guards link:
http://audubonworkshop.com/item_disp.asp?PN=0314

Crystal Hill
Social Circle, GA


From: Dottie Roseboom [mailto:rosedot"at"mtco.com]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 10:54 AM
Subject: Re: Bluebird house openings

Hi Mark, I noticed that 2 websites have been listed for entrance hole restrictors. Our Wild Birds Unlimited Store also sells them. They work!

If you want them for Bluebirds, be sure to get the 1 1/2" opening. I also have several of the 1 1/8" size to protect chickadees from the larger birds.

1 1/4" will allow titmice to nest free from Bluebird interference. HOSP can still enter.

Dottie Roseboom
Peoria IL (central - zone 5)


From: Elizabeth Zimmerman [mailto:ezdz"at"charter.net]
Sent: Thursday, February 17, 2005 5:21 PM
Subject: Hole guards/reducers (sources)

Metal hole guards (also sometimes called "Squirrel tooth benders) are great for keeping woodpeckers or squirrels from enlarging an entrance hole (which can allow access to starlings and other predators.) As Dottie mentioned, if you are trying to exclude HOSP, but allow chickadees, wrens or nuthatches to enter, you need to get one that is SMALLER than 1.25".
Here are some sources I have found. I like the $1.99 kind from Wild Bird Crossing - they look especially nice mounted like a diamond. However they get pricey if you have a lot of boxes.

Hole reducers at The Bird Watcher's General Store (1.99 each, metal, painted)

call Wild Bird Crossing at 508 347-BIRD (1.99 each, metal, painted)

Audubon Workshop (pricey - 3 for 9.95 - may only have wren and chickadee sizes)

Anything Bluebirds (1.95 each - metal ring - bluebird size only)

A Bird's Home (slate - 5.95 each - the kind used on Coveside boxes - bluebird size only)

Jack Finch also sells I think something like 6 for $10 (can't remember) - square copper, bluebird size hole. http://www.danfinch.com/order.htm - you have to call for price.

The wooden ones slow chewing down, but eventually need to be replaced and DO not prevent raccoons from getting their paws inside.

I don't know why they don't make any out of plexiglass….
Bet from CT


From: mrtony8 [mailto:mrtony8"at"cox.net]
Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2005 8:20 AM
Subject: Re: Hole guards/reducers (sources)

I use the ones from Wild birds Unlimited At aboiut $2-3 a box they do become expensive, but not one box of mine has been destroyed over the years I have used them. Well worth the money. of course, you can make them yourself.
Phil Berry


From: Maynard Sumner [mailto:m-r-sumner"at"juno.com]
Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2005 2:02 PM
Subject: Re: Hole guards/reducers (sources)
How many are in a box and what are they made of?

Maynard Sumner
Flint, MI


From: Elizabeth Zimmerman [mailto:ezdz"at"charter.net]
Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2005 2:20 PM
Subject: RE: Hole guards/reducers (sources)

I think he meant per nestbox - they are $1.99 each from some places.
They're made of metal, and painted a nice brown/tan color (looks like rustoleum paint), with four little brass screws.

Bet


From: mrtony8 [mailto:mrtony8"at"cox.net]
Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2005 5:48 PM
Subject: Re: Hole guards/reducers (sources)

They are porcelain covered. Hard enough that nothing fazes them. When I purchase in large lots I believe I pay a buck each.
Phil Berry


Subject: Hole restrictor for Gilbertson box?
Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 17:26:02 -0500
From: Cher <BluebirdNut"at"a-znet.com>

Does anyone know where you can get these? Or where there's instructions for making one?
Cher


From: Amy Louise Marr [mailto:MARR_AMY_LOUISE"at"Lilly.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2005 10:59 AM
Subject: timing of placement for noel guards, wooden hole guards

Hi Bluebirders.
I would like to improve our 25 box trail here at work by adding wooden hole guards combined with a noel guard.

Question regarding timing of their placement. Should I put them on before the birds build a nest, or after they have built a nest and started laying eggs?

Also, has anyone had problems with them-birds not accepting, etc. Do the birds damage wing /tail feathers on them?

Our boxes are on 4x4 posts, so installing stovepipe baffles would be difficult, which is why I"m considering this other guard.

Thanks
Amy

Greenfield, IN 46140
near Indianapolis


From: Bruce Burdett [mailto:blueburd"at"verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2005 11:26 AM
Subject: Re: timing of placement for noel guards, wooden hole guards

Amy Louise,
I would put your guards on *before* they birds begin to build their nests. The less disturbance after nesting starts the better, though these Bluebirds are remarkably tolerant.

Bruce Burdett SW NH


From: mrtony8 [mailto:mrtony8"at"cox.net]
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2005 6:22 PM
Subject: Re: timing of placement for noel guards, wooden hole guards

Any time. Like most with trails, I have moved entire boxes with babies in them, mom may flutter a bit for a minute, but they will tolerate what they must.
Phil Berry
Pensacola Florida


From: Keith & Sandy Kridler [mailto:txbluebirder "at"sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2005 8:50 AM
Subject: Keeping House sparrows out of nuthatch nestbox

Keith Kridler Mt. Pleasant, Texas
Brown Headed nuthatches are also smaller than the House Sparrows so a 1&1/8"
round hole would exclude them from entering the nestbox. Some House Sparrows
can enter a thin entrance 1&3/16" round hole so these must be precisely no
larger than 1&1/8"! I believe the Brown Headed can easily enter a 1" round
hole. You can always add a hole restrictor to the front of the nestbox if
the hole is too large. Try to stay with about the same color of wood for the
replacement or add on.


From: mrtony8 [mailto:mrtony8 "at"cox.net]
Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2005 10:04 AM
Subject: Re: Keeping House sparrows out of nuthatch nestbox

I use a 7/8" restrictor for BHNU, as i have personally witnessed HOSP
squeeze through a hole that size, although I don't think it common. This one
got OUT of my holding pen with a 7/8" opening. Apparently they do what they
have to do.
Phil Berry


From: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu [mailto:owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu] On
Behalf Of Trish Culpepper
Sent: Friday, May 27, 2005 10:18 PM
Subject: Hole restrictor...

Trish - Frankston, TX
I keep seeing info about using a hole restrictor for various things on BB
houses. Can someone describe how to go about making one. If you have a
round hole initially, I assume you couldn't just block a portion of the hole
or it would no longer be a round hole...?



From: Evelyn Cooper [mailto:emcooper"at"bayou.com]
Sent: Saturday, May 28, 2005 6:43 AM
Subject: RE: Hole restrictor...

My husband took a block of 1" wood, drilled a round hole 1 1/2" in the
center and then put holes for screws on each side. I attached it over the
entry hole of the nestbox. It stopped my problem with eggs disappearing. I
am sure it was larger birds.

Evelyn Cooper
Delhi, LA


From: mrtony8 [mailto:philip.berry"at"mchsi.com]
Sent: Saturday, May 28, 2005 4:49 PM
Subject: Re: Hole restrictor...

You may buy them at Wild birds Unlimited or any other decent store.
Phil Berry


From: Herb Kelley [mailto:herbsho"at"earthlink.net]
Sent: Tuesday, June 07, 2005 6:29 PM
Subject: Strange year

This is a think out of the box year, at least around here.
We had a seven EABL nesting, six fledged.
We have several reports of EABL nesting in PUMA boxes.
And another my story. A Black Cap Chickadee build a nest in one our EABL boxes.
No problem, that is until the babies came and a male EABL starting checking out the box.
I was concerned that the EABL might try to evict the babies so I made a 1-1/8" hole cover to protect them.
That day as we were watching to make sure the Chickadees would accept the smaller diameter entrance, the male EABL showed up with a female. They both sat on the box and she stick her head inside and then they both flew off. We thought this is the end of this potential confrontation. When we went to clean out the nest given that they should have fledged, we found the start of an EABL on top of the Chickadee nest. Typical fine grasses we so often see. We removed the restrictor and checked the house yesterday. No further nest building but wasps had moved into the box. We removed the wasp nest and the Chickadee/EABL nest. Am I getting goofy? Does another bird make a EABL style nest, one small enough to fit the hole? Or did a minature EABL show up to claim the box?

Herb Kelley



From: Pauline Tom [mailto:ptom"at"austin.rr.com]
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2006 12:11 AM
Subject: round metal washer as hole protector?

Will a round metal washer (like the ones to play "washers" with) work as a hole protector - to keep squirrels from a nestcam box?

Texas Bluebird Society is nailing down all the details for the "Build Your Own Nestcam" workshop at the NABS Convention.

Pauline Tom

Mountain City (no mountains) TX



From: lviolett [mailto:lviolett"at"earthlink.net]
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2006 2:19 AM
Subject: Re: round metal washer as hole protector?

Pauline, squirrels were getting into some boxes the mountain trail and I added metal electrical rings (connectors). The mountain trail gets below freezing so I coated the metal with silicone caulk as a safety precaution against wet birds getting frozen to the metal.

Linda Violett
Yorba Linda, Calif.


From: Doogelbery"at"aol.com [mailto:Doogelbery"at"aol.com]
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2006 12:21 PM
Subject: Re: round metal washer as hole protector?

I have used the 1 inch ones on my wren and chickadee boxes for years, super gluing them on. It does protect them from the squirrels. I have not found one big enough for a blue bird box though?
Doug Coggeshall
Kensington, Maryland


From: RBALTRUNAS"at"cs.com [mailto:RBALTRUNAS"at"cs.com]
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2006 8:24 AM
Subject: Re: round metal washer as hole protector?

Hi

During the winter, I had Woodpeckers widening the 1 1/2" entrances. Then they went in and drove away the EABL who stay here all year round and keep their claim on the box. I cut donut shaped rings from sheet metal and placed them over the holes. The Woodpeckers gave up trying to peck them and the EABL are now nested in the box. I have Squirrels too and they didn't even think of trying to widen that hole.

Ron
Brooksville, FL

(Note: also see discussion under Chickadees, part 5.



From: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu [mailto:owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu] On Behalf Of mrtony8
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 2:12 PM
Subject: Re: chickadee hole size

Just as an aside, I utilize the 7/8" restrictor when I have Brown Headed Nuthatch nesting, and I can assure you that a dedicated HOSP will have no trouble getting through and successfully nesting.
Phil Berry


From: Rob Baron
Sent: March 23, 2006
Subject: Chickadee hole size

Hey Phil,

So, what is the house sparrow solution then? They seem about as persistent as house flies. I know what I do to house flies, but it only improves my territory. If I leave the screen door open, someone else's come to my house, or mine go to someone else's house.

Life is full of challenges.

Rob Barron



From: Bet Zimmerman [mailto:ezdz"at"charter.net]
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 2:16 PM
Subject: oops clarification on hole restrictors for chickadees vs HOSP

Hole Reducers: For the smallest cavity nesters (e.g., chickadee, titmice, nuthatch) use a hole
reducer smaller than 1.25 to exclude almost all HOSP and protect eggs and birds in the nestbox.
(Again, I put these on AFTER the chickadee starts building).

Frank Navratil determined that for entrances:
ROUND
1 1/4" diameter allows HOSP entry. (Kridler has had HOSP nest in boxes with an exact 1 3/16" hole.)
1 1/8" diameter stops entry.

HORIZONTAL SLOT
1 1/2" x 1" slot allows entry.
1 1/2" x 7/8" stops entry.

VERTICAL SLOT
1" x 1 1/2" slot allows entry.

I had an interesting discussion about this issue with Floyd Van Ert. He noted that most experiments
about what size hole restrictor is appropriate to exclude HOSP or starlings rely on putting a bird
inside the box and seeing if it can squeeze its way OUT. He felt that birds are MUCH less likely to
squeeze their way IN to some of these holes, so the measurements are too conservative.

Bet from CT


From: mrtony8 [mailto:philip.berry"at"mchsi.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 5:26 PM
Subject: Re: Hole Restrictors Added After Eggs Are Laid

I use hole restrictors religiously. The bb sized restrictor is replaced with smaller one if I find smaller birds nesting. I can go down to 7/8" if I get Brown Headed Nuthatch, which was common before hurricane Ivan.
Phil Berry


From: Shawn [mailto:shawnee4"at"charter.net]
Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2007 6:18 AM
Subject: Hole size restrictors

Hello everybirdee,
 
I have six boxes (5 NABS Bluebird, 1 CAWR) on our acre lot, hoping to get many different birds.  CACH have started a nest in one and EABL in another!  I want to make sure another pair of EABL doesn't "evict" the CACH, and wondered where everyone buys hole restrictors (or if you make them what you use). 
 
Thank you,
 
Shawn in Sevierville, TN
From: Mary Beth Roen [mailto:mbroen"at"hotmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2007 7:44 AM
Subject: RE: Hole size restrictors

Shawn,
 
I make my own from thin pieces of plywood about 2.75 x 6 inches. The hole is 1 1/8"for my Black Capped Chickadees. I just quickly
screw this over the 1.5" hole on the nest box with a cordless drill. It only takes a minute. If only it would keep House Wrens out!
 
Mary Roen, River Falls, WI


From: Bet Zimmerman [mailto:ezdz"at"charter.net]
Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2007 1:24 PM
Subject: Hole Restrictors

FYI, I did a little webpage on hole restrictors/guards/squirrel tooth benders in response to a question I got - what they are, what they are used for, where to get them or how to make them.  See http://www.sialis.org/holereducer.htm.  Comments/corrections are ALWAYS welcome

I was very happy to finally find a supplier for Peterson box hole restrictors (nice looking ones too) as many of mine have been enlarged. (The Bluebird Nut)

Bet from CT ...


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