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Click to go to Audubon Society of Omaha Home Page Audubon Society of OmahaEastern Bluebird

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995
Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified

Bluebird feeding - feeder placement

In addition to Messages that have appeared in the Bluebird Mailing Lists on this topic, the following are on the Audubon Society of Omaha website: 


From: "Steve Langer" slanger"at"gte.net
To: "Cornell Bluebirds-Lserve" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu (BLUEBIRD-L)
Subject: multiple bluebird nest sites
Date: Sun, 7 Apr 2002 11:31:03 -0700

We live about 60 miles southeast of Chicago in Northwest Indiana. Our home is in a residential- rural area. Our yard is about 5 acres.

Last year we put out a Wild Unlimited Bluebird nesting box and were lucky in obtaining 2 sets of fledglings. A pair of bluebirds remained in the area over the winter and seem to be getting ready to use the same box to nest in. Bird feeders are located approximately 20 feet away from the bluebird nest. The feeders attract a large variety of birds.

Yesterday I purchased a 2nd bluebird feeder and per the instructions of Wild Birds Unlimited placed the feeder approximately 25 feet from the other bluebird feeder. The fact that the feeders are located near our home doesn't seem to bother the birds. The area where the feeders are located is open.

My questions are:
1. Where should the 2nd feeder be located?
2. Is the 2nd feeder located too close to the 1st feeder?
3.Should the other 2 bird feeders which contain thistle, sazzzfras and mixed seed be moved farther away from the bluebird houses?
Thanks for your help.
Steve Langer


From: "Karen Harder" karenh"at"praxisworks.org
To: wildflower57"at"midmaine.com, "BLUEBIRD-L" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: new bluebird nest
Date: Mon, 8 Apr 2002 11:38:05 -0400

Hello Marjorie,

A fellow Mainer! I'm so glad you asked the question about distance between nestboxes and feeders, as I've been concerned that mine are too close. I hope you won't mind if I coattail on your question. Bruce, if you're reading this -- your answer that they should be as far apart as possible -- is 50 feet, with houses facing feeders, too close? Is 25 feet, with house not quite facing feeder, too close? I don't have much choice.

It's funny -- none of the feeder birds pay any attention whatever to the nestbox area until the Bluebirds, Tree Swallows, or Pheobes lite on them and use them for hunting perches. Then all the feeder birds, the Goldfinches, Mourning Doves, Nuthatches, Robins, Chickadees, they all head for the boxes and the grassy areas around them. Do the Bluebirds just expect this and cope with the commotion? Or is it enough to make them decide to look for a quieter neighborhood?

I'd really appreciate people's thoughts on this, too. Many thanks.

Karen Harder -- Cape Porpoise, Maine

----- Original Message -----
From: Nelson & Marjorie Whipple
To: BLUEBIRD-L
Sent: Monday, April 08, 2002 5:14 AM
Subject: new bluebird nest
 

am putting up a new bluebird house and I just want to confirm the location..should it be away from other birdfeeders..if so how far away..I am placing it 5ft..on pvc pipe hole facing south..it's ok to have full sun..is there anything else I should know?? I will be waitn for a reply before setting up the nest.

Thanks,
Marjorie Whipple
Northport, Me
_________________________________________
Marjorie Whipple
ICQ#:149569584
Current ICQ status:

SMS: (Send an SMS Message to my ICQ): +2783142149569584
More ways to contact me: http://wwp.icq.com/149569584 _________________________________________


From: "Karen Harder" karenh"at"praxisworks.org
To: "Bluebird List" bluebird-l"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: new bluebird nest
Date: Mon, 8 Apr 2002 14:43:16 -0400

Hi Dot --

No, there is no mealworm feeding in the area. I've thought about it a lot, but since I'm in a location that is still pretty natural, I decided not to stretch my interference quite that far. I feel as if *I'm the guest here, but I couldn't resist putting out some regular feeders and nestboxes.

The chickadees and nuthatches have both checked the boxes out and probably turned them down -- it's still pretty early, so I can't be sure. But I suspect they have enough natural sites to use, but I will add the block with the smaller entry if I have to.

My concern about the proximity of the feeders to the houses is not with actual heckling but with just lots of bird traffic and general busy-ness around the houses, if the Blues prefer more peaceful quarters. This area is not developed much, so they're still used to a good amount of elbow room and are probably still able to find natural sites. So I'm in the position of having to *attract* the Blues, rather than providing them with a home they wouldn't otherwise have. So I have to make it as good as I can for them! It may be a losing battle, though, and one that I *should* lose, because besides a good number of crows, there are great-horned owls and 6 species of hawks working the area regularly. But the Blues are happy to use the boxes for hunting perches much of the day, and tree swallows successfully nested in one of the boxes last year, so maybe all will work out harmoniously yet!

Karen Harder -- Cape Porpoise, Maine

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bill & Dot Forrester" forreste"at"ptdprolog.net
To: "BLUEBIRD-L" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Sent: Monday, April 08, 2002 12:52 PM
Subject: Re: new bluebird nest

...


From: "Emily Smith" emilys7"at"earthlink.net
To: karenh"at"praxisworks.org, wildflower57"at"midmaine.com,
"BLUEBIRD-L" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Apr 2002 02:49:21 +0800
Subject: Re: new bluebird nest

Karen, Marjorie, et al.

Just one person's experience: Our sole bluebird box is off to the edge of our back yard, which is full of feeders -- the closest about 20-25 ft away from the box. As a result, there is quite a lot of "air traffic" in the vicinity of the bluebird house, especially in the morning.

However, for the second year in a row, we have nesting blues (it's incubation time now!!), so the close proximity of box and feeders doesn't seem to cause a problem, at least in our yard, even if it is not ideal. I have never seen any of the songbirds that frequent our feeder paying one bit of attention to the bluebird house nor lighting on it. We are lucky enough not to have HOSPs in our wooded area. :)

Good luck and happy bluebirding!

Emily
Efland, NC

----- Original Message -----
From: "Karen Harder" karenh"at"praxisworks.org
Date: Mon, 8 Apr 2002 11:38:05 -0400
To: wildflower57"at"midmaine.com, "BLUEBIRD-L" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: new bluebird nest

...
 

--


From: "Bruce Burdett" blueburd"at"srnet.com
To: wildflower57"at"midmaine.com, "BLUEBIRD-L" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: new bluebird nest
Date: Mon, 8 Apr 2002 14:45:37 -0400

Karen, et al,

If you don't have much choice, then you don't have much choice. Given the situation you must cope with, try to keep the feeders as far from your houses as your situation permits. Then keep a close watch on what happens, and make whatever adjustments are necessary. I just don't like to have feeders any closer to birdhouses than I can help, for the reasons I stated.

Bruce Burdett, SW NH


Date: Mon, 8 Apr 2002 13:37:27 -0700 (PDT)
From: Kerry Sweet ksweet3450"at"yahoo.com
Subject: Feeders & Nestboxes
To: Bluebird Messages bluebird-l"at"cornell.edu

Bruce is so right ... feeders and nest boxes don't mix.

I had to move my mealworm feeder (which is just a tray sitting on the ground) it was too close to my Eastern Bluebird (EABL) nestbox.

The feeder attracted a beautiful Red Headed Wood Pecker and a Mocking bird.

The male EABL REALLY gave the Wood Pecker the devil, the poor thing had to hang upside down and play ring around the tree trunk to escape the dive bombing Mr. Bluebird while the Mocker made off with the worms.

Kerry in NE corner of Okla.

 

--- Bruce Burdett blueburd"at"srnet.com wrote:
Karen, et al,
If you don't have much choice, then you don't have much choice.

...


Date: Wed, 24 Apr 2002 08:39:28 -0700 (PDT)
From: The Doctor sytyf"at"yahoo.com
Subject: mealworm feeders: distance from the nestbox
To: BLUEBIRD BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
 

Hello all,

On my Illinois nestbox trail I have a big city HOSP problem. The HOSP forced me to relocate nestboxes away from the HOSP infestation out to unused pasture land. I never did relocate the mealworm feeder out to the pasture because the Blues continued to come to the feeder everyday even though they were nesting more than 300 yards away. I had the best of both worlds... a productive nestbox trail were the HOSP population was managable and Bluebirds right outside my back door. Things have changed however, the blues have not returned to the feeder for 8 days now. Remember, this particular pair of Blues has made an appearance at the feeded virtually everyday since last June. They even fed their nestlings and fledglings from this feeder.

Speculation: the blues have enough food from hunting but certainly on any given cold and/or windy day, they would return to the feeder. So I theorize that they are spending much time defending their nestbox. With only one tree in the pasture many birds are perching within 20 yards of their nest (5 eggs). They are both highly stressed based on the fact that they persisantly 'dive bomb' me when I get anywhere near the nestbox. I suspect that the eggs have hatched in the past day or two so I am considering moving the mealworm feeder closer to the nestbox (50+ yards). Does anyone on the list feel that the feeder move would be unwise?. One more thing, because there are no trees or shrubs in the pasture I have never seen woodland type birds that might also enter the mealie feeder (ie. nuthatches, titmouse, chickadee etc.)
 

Have a good day

Bob Sitarski a.k.a The Doctor

Jackson County Indiana ( 385244N 086023W )

& Clay County Illinois ( 384008N 0882908W )


From: "Susan Wagener" susan"at"cranberrybend.com
To: "BLUEBIRD-L" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Where do I put meal worms?
Date: Mon, 6 May 2002 14:43:25 -0500

I have meal worms to put out for our pair of Bluebirds. How close to their house should I put them? I have a meal worm feeder or is there a better way of putting them out for them?

Thanks!

Susan Wagener
Nashville, Indiana
South of Indianapolis
East of Bloomington


From: "Randy Jones" randyj"at"enter.net
To: susan"at"cranberrybend.com, "BLUEBIRD-L" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: Where do I put meal worms?
Date: Tue, 7 May 2002 08:31:50 -0400

I made my own feeder from an old broom handle, with a square of plywood screwed to it. Hammered it into the ground, then put a pyrex bowl on top to hold the mealworms. An edging of styrofoam was glued to keep the bowl from blowing off in the wind.

Later, I found a closed feeder at a bird store, You might look to see if there's one near you.

Randy Jones
Lehigh County Coordinator
Bluebird Society of PA
----- Original Message -----
From: Susan Wagener
To: BLUEBIRD-L
Sent: Monday, May 06, 2002 3:43 PM
Subject: Where do I put meal worms?

...


From: "Stan Sadler" sadlerrealestate"at"insightbb.com
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: meal worm feeders
Date: Tue, 7 May 2002 10:48:28 -0400

As a first time guardian ,I'm excited that my BB family has decided to start a new nest after the first box was raided by starlings. We are at war now with those "devil" birds. Box number 2 was readily chosen while it had set dormant during the inhabitance of box number 1. After the starlings had destroyed the eggs in the first box it took about a week for the BB to occupy the other box. One is in my back yard and two is in the front about 200 feet apart. While nesting in the first box I placed meal worms in a dish near the box and neither bird showed any interest in them. Since they have moved in box 2 ,I placed a feeder on the ground at the base of the box and the female eats about 20 meal worms each morning and evening. I used an old wooden tennis ratchet frame with black cloth screen stapled under it. They wait for me to place them out and minutes later their down to feed. At first the male let the female eat while he stood guard. Now they both share together. He likes to feed her alot while he'll take one or two.

 Martinsville,Indiana N 39 25.52 W86 24.53


To: susan"at"cranberrybend.com, BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Date: Thu, 9 May 2002 10:30:14 -0400
Subject: Re:Meal worm feeder Info
From: Terrance H BENNETT thbkab"at"juno.com

 

I personally do not put my meal worm feeder too close to the nesting sight.

I believe this helps to deter predators. I place it within there flight path about 20-25 feet from their nest box.

I use a plain 12"x12"x2" hi square box , attach a rope handle with heavy duty staples and hang it from a mid height tree limb. It is good to hang your feeder towards the end of a branch or off a sheperds hook near a tree so that they can escape from flying hawks, etc. while they are eating. I also clear away a few of the surrounding branches for better visibility. Snakes are not a problem here in Central NY but Hawks sure are!

I place a small sauce dish in the center for the worms. This is a very inexpensive feeder. Be sure to drill holes in the bottom floor for drainage.

Kathy Bennett
Central NY


Date: Thu, 04 Jul 2002 11:22:38 -0400
From: Doug Woodruff w4law"at"woodruffgroup.us
To: "Cornell's Bluebird List" bluebird-l"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Sharing one feeder between two boxes

Any thoughts on sharing one mealie feeder between two Peterson boxes in a field 300 ft apart?

Will both pairs find the feeder if it's 150 ft away?

Will they share the feeder peaceably?

Doug
NW GA

P.S. Got my boxes up late and had despaired of getting any EABL this first season for me -- then last Thursday I found four eggs in one and a nest in the second -- then last night the second box had its first egg.
Ain't life GRAND!


Date: Thu, 4 Jul 2002 10:25:46 -0500 (Central Daylight Time)
From: "Phil Berry" mrtony8"at"mchsi.com
To: blueburd"at"srnet.com, WLInst"at"yahoogroups.com,
BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu,
jquinn07"at"tampabay.rr.com
Subject: Re: Sharing Feeders
 

Bruce,
It has been my experience that every bird will share in mealie feeding. I have had BB's, Mockers, and Woodpeckes share the same feeder without apparent conflict. Phil Berry, Gulf Breeze, Florida


Date: Thu, 4 Jul 2002 14:33:20 -0700 (PDT)
From: Bruce Johnson andyroooney"at"yahoo.com
Subject: Sharing Feeders
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu

Snip
--- Phil Berry mrtony8"at"mchsi.com wrote:
It has been my experience that every bird will share in

...

Hello Phil and all -

I wish the birds here would behave like Phil's. It seems here they have a pecking order with the mockers and robins at the top of the list. The woodpeckers are not a bother.

The only way I can be sure that the bluebirds get access to the mealworms is to use a feeder that excludes the larger birds.

Each year they harass the bluebirds for a few days as they use the feeder trying to get in themselves, after that they seldom are a nuisance.

Bruce J


Date: Sun, 25 May 2003 23:05:40 -0400
Subject: feeding mealies on the box
From: "Haleya Priest" mablue"at"gis.net
To: "Bluebird-L" Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu

Haleya Priest Amherst MA
Someone emailed me to say that it isn't a good idea to feed mealies/currants right at the box. I agree, but in the situation where it is a very short term supplementing I haven't found a problem - I'd rather take the risk then have the chicks be abandoned by parents due to terrible weather! A risk I am willing to take and others may decide it isn't worth the risk - I absolutely understand the argument against.

When feeding on a regular basis (my backyard blues) I have a feeder about 30-40' from the nest box and would not at all consider keeping mealies on the box.
Hope this helps clarify. :-) H
--------------------------------------------
Here is a test to find whether your mission
on earth is finished: If you are alive, it isn't.
-Richard Bach

The online Bluebird Reference Guide: http://birds.cornell.edu/bluebirds/
Mazzzchusetts Bluebird Association: http://www.massbluebird.org
Cornell's Birdhouse Network: http://birds.cornell.edu/birdhouse/
North American Bluebird Society: http://nabluebirdsociety.org/
Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists: http://audubon-omaha.org/bbbox/bestofbbml/bblindx.htm 


Date: Mon, 26 May 2003 11:10:36 -0400
From: Ruth Brinckman oinker"at"comcast.net
Subject: Re: Feeding Mealworms at box
To: Bluebird-L Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu

Ruth Brinckman
Cold and Wet PA

Bob, maybe the bluebirds do not like the container on top of the box. I am in Bucks County, north of Philadelphia and we have had rain 19 out of 26 days. The temps have been mostly in the 50's with some lucky days in the 60's. I don't remember an extreme cold spring like this in 62 years. I am wearing a winter coat to plant flowers in my garden. Rain is forcast for most of the coming week and we are in a flood watch. I have lost a nest of song sparrows due to hypothermia and I fear for the lives of my five six day old Black Capped Chickadees, they are so tiny. My dish for mealies is about 15 to 20 feet from the box. After I fill it with worms, the worms drown and are dead in about 10 minutes. All I can say is just keep putting mealworms out and as soon as they die, replace with live ones. The parents of my four 15 day old nestlings are coming to the dish as soon as I whistle. They immediately take the worms into the box. I truly believe that with all this rain that the Blues are having a difficult time finding insects. I did notice that on the FEW clear days that we did have, the Blues did not eat or take as many mealies to the young, as they do need a substantial diet of insects. Just keep trying and Good Luck.

...



From: Chris&Crystal Hill [mailto:crystaljhill"at"msn.com]
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2005 11:45 AM
Subject: OT-Setting Up Bird Feeding Stations in Yard

Probably a stupid question, but..............

I have 3 yard nestboxes, last spring I had a Carolina Chickadee pair fledge 5, a Tufted Titmouse nesting of six eggs that failed due to predation, pair abandoned nestbox (something thought to be another bird took out the eggs with nest undisturbed, eggs found on ground under box), and an Eastern Bluebird pair fledged 2 (3 unhatched eggs) (same box as Tufted Titmouse pair).

I am looking for the proper way to set up a feeding station in the yard, while not disturbing the possible nesting birds in the boxes.
Is this possible?
My yard is a small one and I don't want to put possible nesting birds in jeopardy because of my lack of knowledge.

I have been offering suet, safflower (only), mealworms, water, peanuts. On hooks off the front and back decks. With various type feeders and hummingbird feeders. But the more I read I am not sure I am doing what is best..........

There are so many here much more experienced.......Any advice?

Crystal Hill
Social Circle, GA



From: Burnham, Barbara [mailto:Barbara.Burnham"at"zzz.zzz]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 7:42 AM
Subject: RE: OT-Setting Up Bird Feeding Stations in Yard

Crystal,

No question is stupid. Not asking is stupid. It sounds like you have had good success with your nestboxes. Congratulations and continued success!

We do have birdbaths in our gardens (one is heated in winter), but the only food we offer is a few mealworms for the bluebirds (they come and eat them before any other birds are even aware of them), and suet mix in the wintertime, always in an enclosed feeder. Our bluebirds stay all year. I have never offered seed mixes or other feeders, and here's why. Many of my neighbors feed birds. My house is high on a hill, and I can watch the hawks as they stalk these feeders. The sharp-tailed (or cooper's I'm not sure
which) will circle from above and then dive. It's like an explosion of birds escaping in every direction. Sometimes the hawks hide in the trees like a cat and just wait for the right opportunity to catch an unwary visitor to those feeders.

To offer seed feeders of any kind near the nestboxes, especially during nesting season--now that WOULD be stupid. That's just my opinion--I'm not an expert, just an observer.

Imagine how many trips the parent birds make to and from the nestbox to feed hungry chicks, and how vulnerable fledglings would be, if hawks learned to hunt there. Hummingbird feeders should be fine, though. Birds don't need us to feed them in the summertime anyway. What the native cavity nesters need from us more than anything is a safe place to nest.

Barbara Burnham
Ellicott City, MD


From: Tina Wertz [mailto:tinawertz"at"bellsouth.net]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 9:27 AM
Subject: RE: OT-Setting Up Bird Feeding Stations in Yard

Crystal,
My bluebird pair use a nestbox only 15 ft from my feeding stations and have been very successful at it. As long as you do not have house sparrows or starlings around, I don't think you will have any problems at all. All the other song birds could care less. And trust me the bluebirds are more than capable of running off any bird that becomes curious. My bluebirds use to come to the platform feeder for the bluebird mix I put out to supplement feed their babies. They are already checking out the box today as I type this. Until summer when there is an abundance of food, continue feeding the birds and everything will be just fine.



From: Dottie Roseboom [mailto:rosedot"at"mtco.com]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 10:38 AM
Subject: Re: OT-Setting Up Bird Feeding Stations in Yard

Barbara, Excellent point about hawks & birdfeeding.

Cats also quickly learn to hide & pounce onto unsuspecting birds as they dine at feeders.

Last year I experimented with feeding mealworms to nesting Bluebirds. The Chickadees & Titmice loved the mealies so much that they were willing to fight Bluebirds! I have never seen this type of aggression from these Chickadees & Titmice.

By feeding only in early morning and late afternoon, and just enough at each time, that there were no leftover mealies, the aggression was lessened. I also used a mobile feeder, which was NEVER left out after the mealies were gone. This prevented the birds from making fruitless trips to a certain location, lessening the chances of a predator associating the feedings with birds.

Once the Bluebirds associate a particular feeder with mealies, the feeder may be moved from location to location. Sometimes this can be very helpful.
One early morning, I laid down the feeder with mealworms,so that I could do some other chores. When I finished, I started looking for the feeder. Being old & forgetful, I couldn't remember where I placed it. While looking for it, I noticed the male Bluebird kept diving into a stack of firewood. Hmmm, must be some good grubs in there. Finally it dawned on me - that's where the feeder was! LOL, the birds were smarter than the monitor.

So, Crystal, as Barbara states, birds don't have to be fed. However, if you do decide to feed them, be observant! Are hawks or cats being drawn into the feeder? Is the feeder creating more aggression than necessary? Keep your eyes open. Your location may have problems that ours don't.

Dottie Roseboom
Peoria IL (central - zone 5)



From: Kathy [mailto:howbizr"at"gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2005 9:21 PM
Subject: Re: House wrens--disaster

On 4/16/05, ZZZ <ZZZ> wrote:
> I don't know if I have a causal relationship here or not, and I know that
> people don't ordinarily recommend feeding mealworms at the box itself, but
> my working hypothesis is that "bed + board" has bonded the blues to this box
> and made them willing to be insistent about it.

I don't know the name of the board, but my boyfriend who has been
doing the majority of the monitoring of our trail while I'm still at
school had a lot of advice from bluebird enthusiasts to put the meal
worms on the box or very nearby. In our case, we have been successful
with leaving meal worms on the top of the box, but that is partly in
response to the constant presence of this pair. We have yet to monitor
the box and not see both the male and the female, which I don't
believe is always the case. We are also hoping that leaving food when
we monitor may help level out of the tension (the clear uneasiness of
the to-be parents).

Kathy Haines


From: Nina Everett [mailto:NINAUT"at"CHARTER.NET]
Sent: Friday, June 10, 2005 2:02 PM
Subject: Re: Aggressive male Bluebird--skittish vs. aggressive


Conleysue"at"aol.com wrote:
This is my first experience with a bluebird box. A pair built a nest in our (new this Spring) backyard box and successfully fledged 5 babies. During the entire process, we fed meal worms regularly by placing them in a feeder attached to the box pole.

I was able to approach the box and view the process and the babies until they were about to fledge. I then stopped viewing, but continued to provide meal worms.Susan,
How did you attach the feeder to the box pole? That seems a good way to entice the bb's to begin excepting mealies.
Thanks, Nina NC


From: Bruce Burdett [mailto:blueburd"at"verizon.net]
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2005 9:32 AM
Subject: Re: Feeders near birdhouses?

Nina, Sue, et al,

In my opinion, it is unwise to put any kind of feeder anywhere near a birdhouse or its pole. Feeders, including mealworm feeders, attract creatures that you don't want near your nesters: chiefly predators and competitors. Even if they don't directly interfere with the nesting, such critters provide a distraction and a worry which the nesters don't need. I wouldn't ever put a feeder closer than about 30 feet.
If you got away with putting the feeder on the pole, I'd say you were just lucky.

Bruce Burdett, SW NH



From: Tree Greenwood [mailto:doctree"at"crosslink.net]
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2005 3:04 PM
Subject: Re: Feeders near birdhouses?

Bruce, I agree with one special exception.
Feeding one pair of Bluebirds WHILE THE HOSTING HUMANS REMAIN PRESENT can be a lot of fun while eliminating the competitor/predator problem.

We don't generally feed mealworms. There's usually plenty of natural food for all of the birds nesting here BUT... This spring, we had a pair of EABB nest earlier than ever before for our property. Just after hatching, the weather turned cold and rainy and we feared the babies would starve. We set a shepard's hook right in front of the nestbox, maybe 5'
away, hung a platform feeder and put mealworms in a glass dish. It only took momma Bluebird a few minutes to discover the easy meals but then she chose to take each mealworm and roll it in the dirt before feeding the hatchlings.
Interesting to watch.

The weather stayed bad so supplemental feeding continued until a week before the babies were due to fledge. My wife and I enjoyed dropping a couple dozen mealworms into the dish, then sitting back in lawn chairs to watch. When a mockingbird discovered the free meals, we moved the lawn chairs closer. Momma Bluebird got used to us being so close; the mocker got blasts from a squirt gun so the baby Bluebirds would benefit from our feeding. We took lots of great photos and had a lot of fun. If we had lots more time and patience, we probably could have had momma Bluebird literally eating out of our hands.

When the weather improved, I removed that feeder and the parents found plenty of natural food.
The fledglings from the first nesting are still around and the parents are now feeding hatchlings from their second nesting. They benefited from their choice of a box very near our house. We couldn't watch closely or feed them like that if they had picked a box farther out.

So Sue and others, if you stick around to watch and make sure that only your Bluebirds get the mealworms, have fun. Just don't leave mealies behind to attract predators/competitors when you go inside.

Take care,

R J 'Tree' Greenwood
Catlett VA



From: Burnham, Barbara [mailto:Barbara.Burnham"at"zzz.zzz]
Sent: Monday, June 13, 2005 1:13 PM
Subject: RE: Feeders near birdhouses?

HOSTING HUMAN REMAINING PRESENT does not eliminate the predator/competitor problem, especially if there are noisy, vulnerable fledglings. I have witnessed a hawk take a fledgling from a tree branch nearby as the bluebird parents were delivering mealworms. I have also read at least one account of a hawk taking a fledgling from the deck rail as the surprised human sat only a few feet away. Hawks learn to stalk bird feeders. They watch and wait for feeding activities to distract their prey. They are so fast, and so completely silent, you might not even know it happened. Competitors such as mockingbirds, starlings, etc. are also attracted by feeding activites.

Making a sound or a whistle to "train" the bluebirds can also "train" the predators and competitors. So once the bluebirds are aware of the offerings, the cues are no longer necessary.

I know it brings these beautiful creatures close to us, and it is fun. But it does have risks. I do offer mealworms to our backyard bluebird pair, but don't overdo it, just a small amount once or twice a day, in a feeder larger birds cannot enter. The bluebirds can eat the mealworms before other birds have a chance to discover them, and they don't linger. I would offer more in some cases (a mate was lost, or a late spring cold snap). Otherwise, they are fine without the mealworms.

Barbara Burnham
Ellicott City, MD


From: Bruce Burdett [mailto:blueburd"at"verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2005 8:04 AM
Subject: Re: Feeder (s) near house??

Mary,
Your pictures of the fledging are great.

They suggest, however, that you have a feeder near the house. Am I right? Wrong?
I would never put any feeder within 20 or 30 feet of a Bluebird house, or any birdhouse. Feeders attract things that you don't want near your houses.

Bruce Burdett, SW NH


From: Sara Ann [mailto:sawright"at"direcway.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 30, 2006 8:08 AM
Subject: Location of mealworm feeder

Now that the BB are finally using the mealworm feeder and have also started nesting, I'm concerned about the location of the feeder. We have sparrow hawks occasionally. We have large old shade trees on most of the property, with some open areas. No matter where I locate the feeder, it would seem that the BB will be vulnerable to attacks. Might it be safer if the feeder were hanging under a tree limb, so the BB could fly into the tree for shelter?

Sara Ann Wright
Missouri



From: Torrey [mailto:torrey_canyon"at"yahoo.com]
Sent: Friday, March 31, 2006 11:09 AM
Subject: Re: Location of mealworm feederHi Sara Ann,

There is no way to make a bird feeder of any sort 100% safe. We've had a Cooper's Hawk come thru several times this past winter, & i always felt strange -- I'm rooting for the hawk to get a bird (cuz i don't want the hawk to starve) & i'm rooting for the songbirds to escape (cuz i don't want the little birds to be killed). If an avian predator does pick off one of your bluebirds, the poor bluebird was not paying enough attention (or was very unlucky), & stupid birds do not survive. (If humans still had predators, you can bet we'd all be a lot more aware of our
surroundings.)

If the feeder's out in the open, hawks can see it but the birds there can also see the hawk. If the feeder's under a tree, it's more sheltered & the birds have an escape route, but they have less warning of an incoming predator. (Plus, Cooper's & Sharp-shinned Hawks are forest birds & maneuver well thru trees.
Kestrels are open field birds, but they don't take a lot of birds as prey.) Our feeder here at the office is between the building & a small group of trees with nearby bushes for escape & shelter.

& then you have to consider loose cats, who like to hide in bushes & pounce on ground-feeding birds. (Or leap & catch birds in flight.) Placing a feeder or a bird waterer or whatever is a balancing act between safety from different predators & ease of use (& maintanance by humans).

However, mealworm feeders shouldn't be stocked full all the time, should they? (I don't have one, but i've read everybody else's discussions, & i like to think i can learn from other people's examples. :-]) People bring out enough worms for the bluebirds to eat in a few minutes so that "non-desirable" birds don't hog all the mealworms. If the birds are only at the feeders for 5 or 10 minutes, the chances of predation are pretty slim.

Let us know how things work out.

Torrey Wenger
Kalamazoo Nature Center
Kalamazoo, MI



From: Cher [mailto:bluelist"at"localnet.com]
Sent: Friday, March 31, 2006 4:49 PM
Subject: Re: Location of mealworm feeder

Mealworm feeders are not meant to be kept stocked all the time. The mealworms don't live very long in extremes of heat or cold, and even if they did, supplying a steady stream would be very, very hard on the pocketbook.

But not everyone's Bluebirds come immediately when the mealworms are offered. The family I had several years ago were "trained" (or did they have ME trained?) to come at the sound of a bell. The feeder was mounted right outside my kitchen window. When we were out, and we'd pull into the driveway, I'd see the Blues race around to the back of the house, where the feeder was. When I'd step into the kitchen, they'd be sitting there looking in the window. In the Blue community, I must have been the celebrated "worm lady".

This year is a different story - at least so far. This couple is very independent and suspicious. They'll sit on my satellite dish mount or on the trellis, and it sppears that they're looking for a handout, but when I go out to put the mealies in the feeder they fly away and may not return for several minutes to several hours.

One solution that solves all problems neatly is an enclosed mealworm feeder - You don't have to watch the feeder to shoo the bully birds away, because they can't get inside the feeder to steal the worms. The worms are protected from direct sun and rain. And hawks or cats can't get at the Blues while they're feeding inside.

I tell the hawks in my neighborhood they're welcome to all the House Sparrows they can catch.

Cher



From: jwick"at"tds.net [mailto:jwick"at"tds.net]
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2006 10:23 AM
Subject: Re: Location of mealworm feeder

One solution that solves all problems neatly is an enclosed mealworm
> feeder - You don't have to watch the feeder to shoo the bully birds
> away, because they can't get inside the feeder to steal the worms. The
> worms are protected from direct sun and rain. And hawks or cats can't
> get at the Blues while they're feeding inside.

Absolutely true, as long as you use a "jail" style mealworm feeder. When using a plexiglass-sided one with "new-to-an-enclosed-mealworm-feeder,"
you must be vigilent. DO NOT PLACE MEALWORMS IN THE FEEDER UNLESS YOU ARE WILLING TO WATCH THE FEEDER. Often, the bluebird is able to enter and eat, tempted by those tasty mealworms, but unable to find the exit.
If this occurs, simply drape an old bathtowel over the feeder, covering the plexiglass sides. This will allow light to enter the feeder ONLY via the entrance holes. The bluebird will "learn" to exit on its own then, as it will be able to "see" the exits. (Often people simply open the feeder allowing the bird to escape. This accomplishes nothing, as the bird is destined to repeat its confusion the next time it enters the feeder.)

:) Ann Wick
Black Earth, WI



From: Tree Greenwood [mailto:doctree"at"crosslink.net]
Sent: Tuesday, April 04, 2006 12:32 PM
Subject: Kestrels - 'Sparrow Hawks' (was "Re: Location of mealworm feeder")

Hi, Sara Ann and group.

I doubt that American Kestrels will prey on your Bluebirds if your Bluebirds are healthy adults.
I have a pair of Kestrels nesting in a box within sight of a couple of my Bluebird boxes.
I haven't seen them annoy Bluebirds or Tree Swallows. They prefer voles and field mice as food. They will raid nests and feed on young birds, take sick or injured birds even as big as a Mourning Dove, and try to beat Buzzards to a roadkilled deer. They also eat lots of large insects like grasshoppers and cicadas.

By the way, when I was young, our little falcons were called Sparrow Hawks because of their size.
http://www.yankeegardener.com/birds/sparrow.htm
Referring to them as Sparrow Hawks is discouraged now because there's another small raptor half a world away that was already going by that name.
http://www.birdsofbritain.co.uk/bird-guide/sparrowhawk.htm
They're little accipiters related to our Sharp- shinned and Coopers Hawks that definitely will predate Bluebirds. No matter what we call them, our American Kestrels are beautiful, fascinating birds, especially the smaller but more colorful male. Things change, even bird names [sigh].

Take care,

R J 'Tree' Greenwood
Catlett VA


From: KCBSP"at"aol.com [mailto:KCBSP"at"aol.com]
Sent: Tuesday, April 04, 2006 6:53 PM
Subject: Re: Kestrels - 'Sparrow Hawks' (was "Re: Location of mealworm feeder")

Hello Sara Ann,

It's always a good idea to put any type of feeder near bushes or large plant etc nearby. If any type of "flying predator" comes down, they fly off to the closest thing. I have some Azalea bushes along the length of front of my porch. They duck in there a lot anyway and it is very often/ At those times for at my home it's most if a sharp shinned hawk appears, and they scoot into the shrubs to hide.

Did you know the HOSP truly love shrubbery? ...

Kathy



From: "Sue" <siouxzieq_0"at"cox.net>
Sent: Tuesday, May 02, 2006 1:34 PM
Subject: Re: Blue Jay

> Would you please expand on reasons why not to put feeders by nest boxes?
> Is it only because it is a central visiting place for all birds? If it is
> because of disease, we have that under control with the area underneath
> the feeders dug up and filled with mulch. My feeders are very near my
> Bluebird box. Will this put my nestlings in danger? I only have peanut,
> safflower and sunflower out now, so I don't have Grackles or that sort
> around.
>
> Please advise,
> Susan Wenzel, Virginia Beach, VA



From: Bruce Burdett [mailto:blueburd"at"verizon.net]
Sent: Tuesday, May 02, 2006 2:15 PM
Subject: Re: Feeders near nestboxes

Sue, et al,

The chief reason for keeping bird-feeders well away from nestboxes is that the feeders attract all kinds of things that you don't want near your nestings. - squirrels, chipmunks, rats, mice, House Sparrows, Starlings, hawks, owls, cats, raccoons, bears, Bluejays, Mockingbirds, crows, 'possums, and, in some places, snakes. Putting feeders near bird-houses is inviting trouble of many kinds. The fewer creatures know where your nestings are the better. Locating feeders near your Bluebird houses puts your Bluebirds at great risk, in my opinion, and I'm not alone in this. Many predators who have no interest in birdseed will learn to hang around feeders in hopes of catching prey attracted by the seeds, suet, etc.
I hope that others will chime in here.

Bruce Burdett, SW NH



From: Bruce Burdett [mailto:blueburd"at"verizon.net]
Sent: Tuesday, May 02, 2006 3:15 PM
Subject: It's bear time!

In answer to those who advocate leaving bird-feeders up after April, I can only say that up here in NH any feeder that's left out after the bears come out of their dens is likely to get lugged off and destroyed. The bears are famished right about now, and in recent years they've been developing a taste for seeds to go with their old favorite - suet.
There was a bear in a yard just two houses from us last week.
A couple of years ago a friend had a she-bear rip a brand new aluminum combination screen/storm door off his house and tear it to shreds.
Why she did this nobody knows.

Bruce Burdett SW NH



From: Herb Kelley [mailto:herbsho"at"centurytel.net]
Sent: Tuesday, May 02, 2006 3:34 PM
Subject: Feeding during nesting season

There have been some good comments recently by the more experienced and esteemed members of this list on the issue of continuing to feed into
the BB nesting season. Most of the discussion was in response to my
concern with seeing a Blue Jay on on of our BB nest boxes. The opinions expressed were that feeders will attract predators to our BB nest boxes.

This is my attempt to bring all of the posters together in one place.
I do not expect to see a winner in any hopefully occurring, ensuring debate., Just an open exchange of ideas and rationale for each persons position. My view, expressed in another thread , says that it is important to continue winter feeding into the nesting season.
My reasoning is that nesting is a time of stress for birds and feeding
during nesting relieves that stress by making food easier to find. I
went on to say that we provide crushed egg shells as a source of calcium at this time and described birds, in particular woodpeckers, coming to our peanut and suet feeders and carrying off peanuts and large pieces of suet to their nestlings. We have even seen the parent bring the juvenile to the feeder for a meal.
In our case we do not place the feeder close to our BB boxes. The
nearest box is over 500 feet away.
But then I am not sure what "near" is. Could someone provide a definition of "near".
The learned comments warning against feeding, caution that a feeder, if it must be used used, should not be placed "near" nest boxes.

So, we feed all birds does that mean that they do not have to seek out other birds as a food source?
Of course one could counter argue that such feeding helps them survive to attack other birds.
I think there has been good discussion on this topic and frankly I would like to see more opinions expressed in an educational not mean spirited way. With that said, I agree that I signed up on a BB list and perhaps my concern with other species is not relevant to the purpose of this
list. f so, I apologize for attempting to keep this topic alive. It
is just that my nurturing feelings toward BB naturally extends to other birds.
Thanks for listening.



From: Bruce Burdett [mailto:blueburd"at"verizon.net]
Sent: Tuesday, May 02, 2006 3:58 PM
Subject: Re: It's bear time!

Cher,
I have never known a bear to bother a nestbox. It's the bird-feeders that attract them.
Up here, people's back yards are among the bears' favorite places because that's where the bird-feeders are. They also like leftover dog and cat food in dishes on decks and back porches, and they're especially fond of any garbage that's left around in accessible places, like trash cans. A bear can open just about any trash can that was ever invented.
One night a bunch of raccoons got into our car. I'd left a window open and a bag of kibbles in the back seat. Bad mistake. They woke us up when they tooted the horn.
I'm very fortunate that it was only raccoons and not bears. Bears have been known to rip the doors off cars.
Fortunately they very rarely attack people. Usually they run away.
The only way to protect feeders from bears is to put them away for the spring and summer and most of the fall.

Bruce Burdett SW NH



From: Mary Beth Roen [mailto:mbroen"at"hotmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 02, 2006 5:30 PM
Subject: Re: It's bear time!

Hi everyone.

I have had bears attack my bird feeders twice, but fortunately they must have just been passing through, because I took down my feeders for a week, then left them up with no further problems. I did have a bear bend over a nest box pole once. Maybe he thought it was a bird feeder. Fortunately it didn't have a nest of Bluebirds in it. I bent it back up and had no further problems.

Mary Roen, River Falls, WI


From: Evelyn Cooper [mailto:emcooper"at"bayou.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 02, 2006 8:36 PM
Subject: Re: Feeding during nesting season

Herb, this is my definition of "how near or far", which ever it should be. If you are still having problems regardless of where the feed is, it means it is still too near. Does that make sense? It really does encourage all kinds of birds and predators when you are feeding. I am for feeding, but if it causes problems during the nesting season, to me, that would mean I needed another plan.

Evelyn


Date: Mon, 08 May 2006 09:19:39 -0400
From: "Bruce Burdett"
RE: BB Observations

Message Donna,
Wholehearted agreement with Denise: - move the mealworms *off* the
nestbox, and keep them a considerable distance away. Feeding at or near
your nbestboxes is asking for trouble.

Bruce Burdett, SW NH



From: denisefarmer"at"comcast.net
Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2006 7:11 PM
Subject: RE: BB observations

Donna,

Great description of all that is going on at your house. I would move
the meal worms off the nest box (could attract other bigger birds) and
put the dish out in the open. Slowly move the meal worms closer to your
enclosed mealworm feeder and in time they should figure it out

Denise


From: plkldf"at"comcast.net [mailto:plkldf"at"comcast.net]
Sent: Tuesday, May 09, 2006 7:23 AM
Subject: Re: BB observations

Paul Kilduff
trail at Oregon Ridge Park, Cockeysville (Baltimore Co) MD

Does everybody agree with the advice below from my Right Honourable Friends Bruce and Denise? I have begun putting several mealworms on the roof of a box after I've monitored it IF the female bolted when I opened the box. I figure it sort of "makes up" for the fact that I've disturbed the nest. (I am not forgetting KK's provocative post from a couple weeks ago about overfamiliarization with humans and its possible dangers. I think there may also be advantages to familiarization. Meanwhile:) If the females bolts from the nest I know she'll be back as soon as I leave. I think leaving 5 mewo on top is beneficial. What do others think?

Paul in Baltimore


From: Bruce Burdett [mailto:blueburd"at"verizon.net]
Sent: Tuesday, May 09, 2006 8:25 AMt
Subject: Feeders far from nestings

Paul, Denise, et al,

My chief reason for keeping bird food and bird feeders well away from Bluebird houses is that they attract all kinds of things that you don't want at or near your nestings, - competitor birds, predators, etc.

Bruce Burdett SW NH


From: Evelyn Cooper [mailto:emcooper"at"bayou.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 09, 2006 8:24 AM
To: plkldf"at"comcast.net; bluebird-l"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: BB observations

I am certain it invites other birds to the nestbox and you do not want that.This is not a good thing for the bluebird pair. It could mean the female might not enter the box when she should to incubate or brood the babies. I would not place them to close to the box.

If you try to choose a time to monitor the box when she is not on the nest, that would help. Mornings they are usually on the nest and if the weather is cool or cold, they can be on there anytime of the day. I had one in cooler weather and it was over a week before I caught her off the nest to check it. She just sat and looked at me.

Evelyn


From: Keith & Sandy Kridler [mailto:txbluebirder"at"sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Tuesday, May 09, 2006 9:21 AM
Subject: Re: BB observations

Keith Kridler Mt. Pleasant, Texas
I don't feed mealworms but this placing of mealworms occasionally on the top of a trail nestbox is different than installing a mealworm feeder in a yard near an active nestbox and then adding mealworms to the feeder everyday or several times a day or giving the birds free choice on the amount of mealworms in the feeder.

Each person across the country will have a different set of problems to deal with and experimentation and sharing of knowledge of what they are doing and WHY they are doing something helps all of the bluebirds.

The late Betty Nichols there in Maryland attached a canned cat food tin can to a 1"x2" slat so that the can was raised up above her active bluebird nestboxes about a foot higher than the roof. When she ran her trail she placed a few mealworms in the tin can mealworm feeder each trip at each active nestbox. She did this because during a cold snap if food became scarce the bluebirds would associate her coming to the boxes and during an emergency she could feed them enough to get them and their young through a severe cold spell. The tin can/stake also served as a perch as the small wood stake extended up above the tin can. Since she only placed enough mealworms in the can on each trip to give her birds a snack the other bird species in the area never learned to look for food in these feeders on top or really above her active nestboxes. She did have one Mockingbird that learned to follow her around the trail and this bird would raid the mealworms while she was standing guard just a few feet away. She found that she could stuff the Mockingbird once per trip as it would follow her all around the park until it filled up anyway.

Jack Finch designed the first bluebird feeders for feeding fruits and berries back in the late 70's early 1980's and he would convert some nestboxes in the fall to a special feeder box where he replaced the normal bluebird house door with a special door so that bluebirds could see dogwood berries that were placed inside the nestboxes but only bluebird sized birds or smaller could enter to get the berries or raisins. He prepared for a major winter disaster that only hits about once a decade but he found that a family of bluebirds would guard these nestboxes and only allow one family group to feed inside these nestboxes/converted bluebird feeders. He had hoped that placing a few of these feeder boxes scattered across his huge trail would actually feed dozens of families of bluebirds. He had hoped he could drive in the snow or ice once a day and fill these boxes up with berries but he seldom ever saw more than one family use each feeder.

Linda Violett and quite a few others also drop off a few mealworms for their birds everytime they monitor. In park settings this is probably OK as the birds are not coming to your hand they are only coming to the nestbox after they see a human approach the box. In extreme rural areas with no close neighbors you could train birds to come to your hand for food. But if you have close neighbors a bird that attempts to land on them when they raise their hand will frighten the average person. You also have to determine if there is the possibility of a local person who might use a pellet gun and shoot all types of birds that fly up close to them.

I think if you watch the made for TV Avian Flu movie tonight you are going to see that they are going to attempt to scare the public to death and this movie will make all birds suspect of bringing death and destruction into the backyards of their children. I really fear the reaction the average person will have to this disease when it appears in North America. KK



From: Steve Murphy Home [mailto:thcri"at"qwest.net]
Sent: Saturday, May 13, 2006 4:08 PM
Subject: Help Quick

Ok, I went out and cleaned all of the poop out of my house. Mom and dad are now working away, in and out they go. I am sure they are building the nest.
I am about as excited as a kid with his first bike.

I have this nice blue bird feeder with some meal worms in the fridge. Do I just hang the feeder from the closest tree and how high up. It is my understanding they like to feed from the ground?? Or should I just hand it from the lowest branch??

Steve Murphy



From: denisefarmer"at"comcast.net [mailto:denisefarmer"at"comcast.net]
Sent: Saturday, May 13, 2006 10:56 PM
Subject: RE: Help Quick

Steve,

If I remember correctly, another lister told me to put the mealworms in a
shallow dish near a tree or bush where the BB's fly to and once they find
that then you can slowly entice them into a feeder.

Denise


From: Bet Zimmerman [mailto:ezdz"at"charter.net]
Sent: Friday, May 19, 2006 2:18 PM
Subject: distance from nestbox to mealworm feeder

With regard to leaving a few mealworms on top of a box after monitoring:

I’ve gathered conventional wisdom is as follows:

Do not put feeders too close to nestboxes (except temporarily during training.) The feeder should be about 100' away from a nestbox so predators and nestbox competitors are not attracted to the box. If you use a feeding bowl on top of or on the nestbox pole (which I don't recommend), only put in enough worms to be eaten immediately (~ 5 per bird) while you are nearby. Mockingbirds are sometimes a problem, as they may drive bluebirds away. Try moving the feeder away from where mockingbirds nest (e.g., conifers).

Hawks sometimes learn to hang out by a birdfeeder, looking for easy prey. Cooper's hawks and American Kestrels in particular might nab a bluebird at a feeder, and a Red-shoulder Hawk might get a fledgling. These raptors are native species, and have to eat and feed their own families. However, to minimize the risk to bluebirds you attract to a feeder, locate feeders where there is some overhead protection from divebombing, and consider minimizing feeding when fledglings are out.

I DO have a nasty photo of a headless bluebird at http://www.sialis.org/hospattacks.htm - the male was eating a few mealworms on top of the nestbox, and was attacked by a house sparrow, perhaps attracted by the box, perhaps by the worms, perhaps by both. The bluebird did not survive.

I use mobile feeders for some bluebird nestings http://www.sialis.org/feeder.htm#mob away from my house, and boy do they see me coming! I don't need to put the mealworms all that close – they seem to recognize my car.

More on feeding mealworms to bluebirds at http://www.sialis.org/feeder.htm

Bet from CT



From: Perez Veronica [mailto:v_perez11"at"yahoo.com]
Sent: Monday, June 12, 2006 11:16 AM
Subject: nestbox location and birdfeeders

Hi,
I've set up my first nestbox in the backyard. I have a birdfeeder set up for the house finches and other birds that eat hulled sunflower seeds . I also have a suet log for the woodpeckers. My backyard is not that big but the bird feeders are at one end and the nest box is at the other end maybe 50 or so feet between them.
Now the bluebird seem to prefer hunting in my front yard perched on my mailbox ( I've seen the bb two days in a row perching on my mailbox ). My question is , do all this activity in the backyard bother the bluebirds . The finches can be rowdy but they are so cute I would hate to have to give them up by taking away the birdfeeder. Or is it because my front yard is one giant lawn with no trees whatsoever and the bb prefers that environment.

Veronica
Richmond,VA



From: Keith & Sandy Kridler [mailto:txbluebirder"at"sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Monday, June 12, 2006 12:04 PM
Subject: Re: nestbox location and birdfeeders

You probably have a better source of insects around your mailbox. Adults also try to feed a little ways from their nest to draw attention of potential predators to another location. Finches as others have mentioned make good food for Sharp Shinned and Cooper Hawks.

....



From: Maynard Sumner [mailto:m-r-sumner"at"juno.com]
Sent: Monday, June 12, 2006 2:53 PM
Subject: Re: nestbox location and birdfeeders

Veronica,

Yes, the Bluebird like open lawn.
Maybe you could put a box up in the front lawn and they will pick the one they like best.

Maynard S



From: Perez Veronica [mailto:v_perez11"at"yahoo.com]
Sent: Monday, June 12, 2006 3:24 PM
Subject: Re: nestbox location and birdfeeders

Maynard,
I'm already considering that option and have found a nestbox that looks good enough to put in the front lawn so my neighbors won't complain. It's hard living in a subdivision where putting up a fence or landscaping needs approval ....

Veronica



From: denisefarmer"at"comcast.net [mailto:denisefarmer"at"comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, June 12, 2006 5:37 PM
Subject: RE: nestbox location and birdfeeders

Veronica,

The only problem I can see with the hulled sunflower seeds is that they will attract HOSP and we know what they can do. So if you don't have any HOSP at this time, that is great, but otherwise, you might want to switch to sunflowers in the shell. I know this is messy on the ground but better that then getting HOSP. I have just switched to the non-hulled kind and my HOSP though they nibble on them they do not eat like they did when I had the hulled shells.

Denise
Parkville, MD



From: Perez Veronica [mailto:v_perez11"at"yahoo.com]
Sent: Monday, June 12, 2006 8:38 PM
Subject: RE: nestbox location and birdfeeders

I definitely don't want HOSP. I thought all they
wanted was waste grains. How about safflower seeds,
would HOSP like this ?


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n an impartial and objective manner.
If you have problems, encounter broken links (unless they are within an e-mail thread, as I do not maintain those links), or have suggestions on how the site can be improved to make it more useful, please contact the Best of Bluebird-L Classifieds webmaster
Website design by Chimalis