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Click to go to Audubon Society of Omaha Home Page Audubon Society of OmahaEastern Bluebird

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995
Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified

Bluebird Pictures, Photographs and Photography

In addition to Messages that have appeared in the Bluebird Mailing Lists on this topic, the following are on the Audubon Society of Omaha website:  Bluebirders Picture Gallery


Date: Sat, 13 Oct 2001 19:15:19 -0700
From: Linda Violett lviolett"at"earthlink.net
Subject: WEBL Photos

Linda Violett - Yorba Linda, Calif.

Just received a new digital camera with zoom capabilities last night and thought the List might enjoy some western bluebird photos on my web page: http://home.earthlink.net/~lviolett/

One picture shows a banded male; he was banded as a nestling this year and the colors are true.  The blue of our westerns are more of a violet blue rather than a sky-blue and the underbellies are a dirty-grey with undertones of blue. Some females on my trail have a turquoise blue on their primaries and tail edges and I'll try to capture those variations sometime in the future.


From: "dottie price" yumyumkatts"at"voyager.net
Subject: Good Bluebird Pictures
Date: Sun, 14 Oct 2001 12:45:05 -0500

Does anyone know of some Web Sites that have really good Eastern Bluebird pictures with their true color and not looking so artificially blue?

Thanks!!  Dottie, Brown County, Indiana


From: "Teri Casper" ticpen99"at"hotmail.com
Subject: Re: Good Bluebird Pictures
Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2001 00:23:54 +0000

BRAW's website has some great pictures taken by one of our members.  Each page has a different photo.  www.BRAW.org

Teri Casper, Community Relations for BRAW


From: "Stan, St. Paul, MN [44.444N, -93.106W]" stan1bb"at"frontiernet.net
Subject: Re: Good Bluebird Pictures
Date: Sun, 14 Oct 2001 21:19:49 -0500

Hi Dottie and EveryBIRDie!

Check out some of the following websites:

http://www.waveone.net/jaa/ibspage3.htm

http://www2.go-concepts.com/~mrsimple/

http://www.naturephotosonline.com/npo_sub.asp?RPP=9&ORN=&CAT =--+All+Categories+--&PN=--+All+Photographers+--&CON=--+All+ Continents+--&KEY=0&txtSearchCriteria=bluebirds&cmdSubmit1.x =49&cmdSubmit1.y=9

http://audubon-omaha.org/bbbox/bbgal.htm

Happy bluebirding!

Stan


From: "Pamela Ford" jpford"at"home.com
Subject: bluebird photos
Date: Fri, 30 Nov 2001 17:41:04 -0500

My bluebird gang of between 7 and 10 bluebirds is still appearing daily. Below is a link to some pictures I took today.  One shot caught a male and female bluebird along with a goldfinch and a house finch.  In others, I thought is was interesting how the zoom lens caught the various open beaked squabbles when all looked peaceful to the naked eye!

I also had one of the male bluebirds flying at and attacking a window in which a blue bottle was setting.  I wonder if the blue bottle had anything to do with the behavior or if was just coincidence?

I sure am glad they're still around.

Pam in Abingdon, Harford County, Maryland

http://www.imagestation.com/album/?id=4292217759&code=2281635&mode=invite


From: "Pamela Ford" jpford"at"home.com
Subject: Hovering Bluebird photos
Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2002 19:49:01 -0500

The number of bluebirds in my backyards keeps increasing. While I had 6 in early fall (3 males and 3 females), now it's a consistent 10 or 11 (still only 3 males).

I've been watching them pile into the nest boxes during the day (although I don't believe they've ever roosted there overnight, they always head off toward the woods just before dark). They will enter the box one at a time until there are about six in the box. These are just regular NABS style boxes! How do they fit? Then they come out one at a time though not necessarily in last-in-first-out order.

I'm having a ball with my new digital camera Christmas present... but I think my bluebirds have had enough. They seem to be tired of having me peeking out from every corner or sitting still near the feeders. The camera can take pictures in sequence and this afternoon it allowed me to capture a male bluebird hovering over the mealies, afraid to land because I was sitting just 8 feet away. The frame rate was 1.8 seconds per frame and 5 pictures were shot. He was in the frame before the first picture and in nowhere in sight for the fifth.

Below is a link to the new pictures.

http://www.imagestation.com/album/?id=4292217759&code=2281635&mode=invite 

Pam in Abingdon, Harford County, Maryland


Date: Tue, 23 Apr 2002 11:36:31 -0700 (PDT)
From: Bruce Johnson andyroooney"at"yahoo.com
Subject: Off topic .... a closeup photograph of a male bluebird with a mouthfull of mealworms.

Hello Gang -

I lucked up last week and came up with a decent image of a male bluebird with five mealworms in its beak, ready to feed the nestlings. The fifth one is hard to see, but it's there.

Since we do not send attachments I uploaded this image to my website, anyone interested can view it there. Depending on your email software, you can click on the image for a larger view. My website address is:

http://home.midsouth.rr.com/conservewildlife/bluebird.htm

If you want to access the above internet site, be sure you get the complete address. It is long and sometimes it will not work as a hotlink.

If you are unable to access the site and want to see this photo, let me know and I will email one to you privately with the photo attached.

Best regards,

Bruce Johnson
Life member NABS
Memphis TN
Extreme southwestern TN


Date: Wed, 24 Apr 2002 15:02:00 -0400
From: Pamela Ford jpford"at"comcast.net
Subject: Updated bluebird baby photo link

I've attached a link to my updated album of bluebird photos. This is the very first time I've had five in a nest! I took a picture today of the 4-day old babies. Compared to the pictures of them at 2-days old, there is quite a change in wing-shape and color of skin. At 2-days of age the wing looks like a pinky finger - at 4 days its beginning to take the shape of a bird wing. I suppose the color change is the darkening caused by the feathers developing under the skin. Looking at them at this stage, it's hard to believe how quickly they'll be able to fly away.

http://www.imagestation.com/album/?id=4292217759&code=2724568&mode=invite 

Pam in Harford County, Maryland


Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 11:21:49 -0500 (Central Daylight Time)
From: "Ernie Tucker" ernie724"at"citlink.net
Subject: Bird pix

With my wonderful, colorful sight yesterday, and the response to it, I've decided I need to get busy again and have my camera more on the ready. We have lots of year-round birds - and we feed year-round, including suet (the commercial all-weather types). We have just lived in this house about a year and a half and are still trying to get some landscaping done - or to grow! Some of the birds we haven't seen since we moved in are now beginning to show - and I would assume it's the fact that we are feeding. We have at least 5 rose-breasted grosbeaks that have been around for almost 2 weeks - 2 pair and an immature male. We have at least two indigo buntings. Where we used to live they would stay all summer, and we're hoping they'll do the same here. Our other house - located in the woods - was full of cardinals - we have one pair around here now - and they just showed up. My wife saw a towhee the other day - but not again. We had a pair of flickers shopping for a nest, but they must have gone elsewhere. This is the first time we've been able to attract bluebirds. At our other house - the last year we were there we had a gaggle(?) of herons nesting in a treetop nearby. Watching one of those huge, long-legged wading birds land in a treetop was a sight to see We know we have a pair of red-headed woodpeckers nesting nearby. Our lawn sometimes look like a carpet of dandelions there are so many goldfinches on the ground. There are some dandelions, too.

If anyone would like to see some of the bird pictures I have taken - there are some bluebirds - click on the Bluebird Nestling icon at www.jetimaging.com.


From: "Stan Sadler" sadlerrealestate"at"insightbb.com
Subject: new pics- bb
Date: Thu, 16 May 2002 11:54:45 -0400

http://www.ofoto.com/I.jsp?m=3D27272791403&n=3D1431665855 

These are some pictures of my first nesters. I'm located about 25 miles south of Indianapolis,In. I'll try to add more to this folder as time allows


Date: Mon, 20 May 2002 20:44:24 -0700 (PDT)
From: Bruce Johnson andyroooney"at"yahoo.com
Subject: Photograhs of young bluebirds.

Hello all -

I lucked up and came up with a couple of photos of young bluebirds, (four weeks old) that I liked. If you don't have anything better to do and want to take a look, here is the URL:

http://home.midsouth.rr.com/conservewildlife/photos.htm 

The images are the second and third down on the page. If you have trouble accessing the web-site, let me know and I can send it as an attachment.

=====
Best regards,

Bruce Johnson
Life Mbr. NABS
Memphis Tennessee
(Extreme southwestern TN)


From: "Bruce Burdett" blueburd"at"srnet.com
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Cc: WLInst"at"yahoogroups.com
Subject: B&BAprMay
Date: Sun, 26 May 2002 07:21:20 -0400

Anyone who likes both Revereware and Bluebirds will enjoy seeing the photo by Harry McClelland (OK) in the April/May 2002 issue of "Birds and Blooms." (p. 33) I've enlarged it and printed it on good paper for framing. It came out beautifully, though a little oddly-shaped. Bruce Burdett, in SW NH


Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 08:36:34 -0700
From: Emily Smithemilys7"at"earthlink.net
Subject: Updated bluebird photos

Hi all,

I have updated my web page with new bluebird pictures of fledglings seen in our backyard over the holiday weekend as well as new feeder bird pictures. I am still tweaking the formatting a bit (there's some extra space on the bluebird page that shouldn't be there), but the page is okay otherwise. Feel free to take a look!

http://home.earthlink.net/~emilys7

We were so excited to see three of the four that fledged on May 7th back in our yard over the weekend, hunting, drinking from the birdbath, and hanging out with Mom and Dad. They went from being mostly absent since the fledge to in our sight off and on all day!  ...

Emily
Efland, NC


Date: Fri, 31 May 2002 21:33:21 -0700 (PDT)
From: Bruce Johnson andyroooney"at"yahoo.com
Subject: Photo of a male and female bluebird

Hello all -

I added a couple of photographs of bluebirds to my personal website, one is a male on one of my nesting boxes the other is a female on a stump.

For anyone that doesn't have anything better to do and wants to take a look, here is the URL address:

http://home.midsouth.rr.com/conservewildlife/photos.htm 

No color was added to the photographs. This is the way my digital camera recorded them. Both were taken in the shade which seems to bring out the blue much better.

The website address is long so you may need to do a copy and paste to get in the full address. On my browser anything in an address that appears on another line will not work.

Best regards,

Bruce Johnson
Life Mbr. NABS
Memphis Tennessee
(Extreme Southwestern)


Date: Wed, 05 Jun 2002 02:17:28 -0000
From: "bluesbros617" r.luther"at"gte.net
Subject: Bluebirds just fledged... Pictures Posted

Bluebirds in Binghamton, NY. 5 eggs hatched May 11, 4 survivors fledged June 1. Pictures posted at this site: http://moogarchives.com/bluebird.htm


From: Simon Theresa"at"Bowecho.com
Subject: pictures please
Date: Wed, Jun 5 2002 20:49:28 GMT-0400

i have five baby something-or-others that will be ready to fledge in a week or less.... can someone send me to a site where I can find pictures of juvenile HOSPs so that I can make sure that I am not unleashing even MORE HOSPs on my neighborhood? I don't want to let them fledge if they are HOSPs, but I certainly don't want to harm them if they are anything else. -theresa


Date: Sat, 15 Jun 2002 01:24:21 -0000
From: "bluesbros617" r.luther"at"gte.net
Subject: Re: Bluebirds just fledged... Update - New Pictures Posted

--- In bluebirdtrail"at"y..., "bluesbros617" r.luther"at"g... wrote:
Bluebirds in Binghamton, NY. 5 eggs hatched May 11, 4 survivors
fledged June 1. Pictures posted at this site:
http://moogarchives.com/bluebird.htm

It's been 2 weeks now. The babies are now visiting with their mom. The male (not the father) is courting the mother, they've built a new nest in the same box. He won't have anything to do with the fledglings now, in fact he chases them away from the food.

New pictures at this location:
http://moogarchives.com/bluebrd4.htm 


Subject: OT: Nice Tree Swallow photo
From: Jeff Macdonald jeff.macdonald"at"virtualbuilder.com
Date: 06 May 2003 20:44:50 -0400

I was able to get really close to the Tree swallows as they were defending an empty box. Check it out at http://www.virtualbuilder.com/archives/000014.html 

--
Jeff Macdonald jeff.macdonald"at"virtualbuilder.com


Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2003 11:50:45 -0400
From: Wendell Long mrsimple33"at"go-concepts.com
Subject: special bluebird picture

Friends, Yesterday, I had the good luck to photograph an immature eastern bluebird and I forwarded a copy to a number of you who had such nice things to say about bluebirds but more importantly about me! The photograph created confusion among the constituency. A few dear friends accused me of devious things--such as being a professional or even an artist. Well you all can imagine how that smarts!

The bird in question is indeed who I claimed it to be even if it is photographed from behind with its wings spread in somewhat of a sunning or drying fashion and you cannot see its face. In any event the uproar caused such a stir among certain experts on the list I had to do further research to reassure myself and friends that what I had photographed was a truly full blooded all American eastern bluebird. ..if you wish a photo of my favorite bluebird picture, please let me hear from you and I will send you a small jpeg...

Wendell Long Genuine Amateur
Waynesville, Ohio


Subj: Bluebird Photography(Fact & Fiction)
Date: 1/4/00 8:41:49 PM Central Standard Time
From: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net (Wendell Long)

Dear Loving, Giving and Forgiving Friends and Pals All--Hear ya, hear ye, please lend me your ear!

My bride changed to Gilbertson from Peterson, Kentucky Slot, Nabs boxes because she liked them.

I don't claim to be a bird expert here on this list of the most informed birding people of all. I do claim to be among the worlds great Bluebird photographers. Those of you who are graduates of my Advanced Bluebird Photography Internet Workshop know how good you are after completing you homework. You also know how much those payments on your new lens hurts.

I do prefer the Gilbertson when I am photographing at the nest box. For several reasons, included among them:

1. When I need more natural light for greater speed, I gain 1/2 f stop by the bird being near a reflective surface, allowing me to use a slower film speed and achieve an accurate special Bluebird color, of which there is none other so beautiful.

2. The box is kewl in fashion and ambiance.

3. It allows a loving pair in a flattering position for a cover page on top of the flat top.

4. It has a good leading line perspective when one bird is at the hole and the other is looking down from top.

5. It is flattering background as the bird flies away from the hole when you are shooting from the front toward the box.

6. It is a better size when shooting within 9ft from the hole with a lens between 300-600mm range.

7. The bird when on final landing approach has a pleasing set of the wings and legs compared to other boxes. A set that resembles the set when approaching a natural nest cavity in a tree or fence post.

8. Lastly but not leastly, it blocks less view when shooting from behind and getting in tight for a close up just before the bird enters with it's bug.

Now, I am not as stupid as I look and I realize if you don't photograph you do not care at all about this and those of you who paint already know all about it. But sometimes I am amazed in some of my Internet Bluebird Workshops, in my mind, for Senior Advanced Professional Wildlife Photographers, how little they pay attention to the detail around the bird. Believe me, after one week here on the Ridge, they notice the Bluebird box or I kick 'em out and send them home without their breakfast grits! That shows 'em! Thunderation, they could be wasting their time in another workshop!

But for the few who do enjoy photographing Bluebirds in a serious and enjoyable way and are addicted to it as one has to become, consider your box in your photograph if you are doing bird/box combinations for advertising, internet, books, editors, magazines or just plain ole fun as your hobby. And just for fun and proof to yourself, measure your graycard next to a Gilbertson vs other boxes and see what you come up with.

All serious Bluebird Photographers on the list, feel free to email a small jpg attachment and I will be your critic if you are open minded and take helpful criticism easily without taking yourself seriously---only your photography ok? No charge of course--why would I charge for something I enjoy doing anyway? Same as my free internet Bluebird Photography Workshop(no charge-but limited number is 5 students at one time) But please keep your shots as small as my little screen, in the neighborhood of 13 inches. Digital, scanned, negative, positive, other; let me know what. Now you characters on here(you know who you are) don't go sending me jokes, and so called funny pics. Not looking for a bunch of comedians here, save it for the humor network. All nudes will be returned and you will be reported to Keep it Clean committee, Honorary General Chairman, former Playboy Photographer and all around great writer--Well you can guess who that is, without my naming her here!

Wendell Long
Waynesville,OH
...

Thanks to the committee for publishing my poem--The Bluebird Season. My best work by far. I am honored to have it among the premier writers.


Subj: Beginning Bluebird Photography(plus simply good to be alive isn't it)
Date: 1/17/00 3:52:00 PM Central Standard Time
From: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net (Wendell Long)
Sender: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu

Friends:

All my box holes are the same if I use the same rule: 1 9/16 man that is close to 1 1/2 about that much }{oops about 1/2 that much.That looks more like 1/8 rather than 1/16 on my screen. They seem to be okay.

I have been ask to increase my beginning Nestbox Internet Bluebird Photography Workshop to accomodate members of the list and those interested in Bluebird Photography but have no experience or almost none. I have one open slot for such a student of Beginning Nestbox Bluebird Photography Internet Workshop. Open to someone on the bluebird list at no charge. This is for beginners, if you are advanced and/or experienced bird photographer this is not the right workshop for you. Here, I assign a total of 5 photos for you to complete, as one is completed you then go on to the next until all 5 have been made to your satisfaction. Simple as this:

1. I email you an attachment for you to make a photograph at the nestbox as similiar as you can get to mine. Here in number 1 we start out easy--just a close up of a bluebird at the nest box hole. (Just a dull shot as one friend called it) Your choice of equipment and film or digital.

2. Next shot same shot but more interesting in some way by expression, action, movement as you judge to be.

3. Next, two bluebirds at the nestbox.

4. Bluebird leaving the nest in flight.

5. Bluebird approaching nest with wings set for landing or just before with wings in interesting flight pattern.

Things we try to accomplish will be: Sharp, bright, clear photos. Framed as close as possible but still maintain good focus and color balance. Natural look, without flash or computer manipulation--just as they come from the camera. Improvement from number 1 assignment thru number 5 when compared with pleasing and interesting composotion and technical image effect.

Maximum of two weeks given to complete each assignment from time you receive my attachment example.

If this is something you want to do, drop me an email withing the next day, telling me of your interest. I have only one opening since I dont run large workshops, so this kind of learning is based more on the individually guided education and interest of the person, but the basic 5 items I list must be completed before any other work is done.

Why do I do this someone ask? It's fun! I enjoy it! And it fits my joy of living. That is giving=growth and learning=joy and growth=freedom of spirit. Sorry, I don't have anything to sell or buy.

I must add my grandaughter is doing very well thank you to those who let me brag to you.

If you want to be added to waiting list for the beginning workshop let me know your timeframe and I will let you know if we can work it out.

For those who ask about my creative writing workshop, I don't do that one anymore since my diagnosis of parkinson's and wife's MS.(I would write it out, but I never learned to spell it). I Ran outa time for teaching, now trying to spend more time learning how good life really can be! Wish I were sixteen again and as smart as our lister who said he/she was 14 yrs old and expressed the joy of helping his grandpa with bluebirding. If you missed his post, you missed one of the most thrilling pieces. What hope he gave us about what wonderful young people are around today! Plus I like the way he tells us who he is when he writes! He knows who he is and by gollie he let's us know too. Thank you--you know who you are. I just wonder who gave you such a good start in life? Did anyone save his post I am talking about? I don't have his permission to use his name or I would just blurt it out right here, stand up on my bluebird box and give a speech in his honor!!

But a hint would be, if I remember it right, he has the first name of a big country songwriter and singer. Bless his little pea pickin heart. No no not Tennesse Earnie Ford nor Tennessee Williams either.

By the way,speaking of williams, to Jim Williams, Are you still our editor. If you are I miss hearing from you now and then. I don't mean the notes where you spoke of my clutter and rambling LOL. I mean just saying Hi, are you ok?? I see your name on the Bluebird. And yes save some Dreams for the future.

Wendell Long

PS Boy it was cold. I sat in my van and cheated this morning, but the titmouse came in and posed anyway. He doesn't stay long though--he just grabs that seed and whoosh he's gone. But the sun went in and I was using 50 iso Velvia so he was a little fast for me--had to go down to 2.8f and 125 shutter. It's rough.

PSS: I have spent lots of time on the internet,different list, chat rooms, IMs, on and on for several years now and have seen many improvements both in fun and serious Internet sites. I have met more nice people and got to know some fairly well though have not met personally. But, I bet many of you can agree, you have not met a group, where all around, total character, spirit, warmth and understanding is greater anywhere than the bluebird-L! If there is such a place, please tell me for I have missed it and I will join. I am not running for office,I vote for the guy who is, I've been there(not here),but I was President of something one time, as the popular saying of the day seems to be. But I would be surprised if my feelings are not shared about this list. Thanks to Cornell and the NABS for such good work! If I were a joiner I would go out and join something right now! Well, assuming dues free of course. Ok Ok I hush, you don't have to yell!!!


Subj: Micheal D. Smith/mad bluebird
Date: 1/23/00 8:42:03 AM Central Standard Time
From: kridler"at"1starnet.com (Keith & Sandy Kridler)

Keith Kridler Mt. Pleasant, Texas ...

In 1977 M.D. Smith had the photographs of "his" bluebirds published in National Geographic 151: pages 854-865.

For those interested in photo tips for Wendell's class :-) you can get by with a tripod, a decent 35 mm camera and the stock 50 mm lens. You will need a cable release, I use a cheap "air release" (a squeeze bulb that pushes air through a 60' plastic tube) to trip the shutter. An automatic advance is great so you do not have to walk up to the box and manually advance the film. With this system you can get fair close-ups by setting the camera at it's closest focus setting on the nestbox or just in front to capture the parents feeding "on the wing". Set the tripod and a fake camera up a day or two ahead of when you can take pictures...Try to chose a day with thin high clouds to reduce shadows if not using a flash. Use a high shutter speed to slow the wings and other movement.

Trying to find the information on the "research" into the "why's" of the Peterson Oval hole which Haleya asked for, I watched the videos "BLUEBIRD TRAILS" & "JEWELS OF BLUE" done for/by the Minnesota group in 1988 and they tied/staged a live Starling to the top of a nestbox to record the interaction of the bluebirds. A disruption at the nestbox will often get both parents fluttering in front of the box so a camera focused there with get both adults at the same time....If you try to get a shot of the parents feeding "on the fly" coming into the box you will most likely end up with a shot of a tail entering the hole....But if you block the inside of the box so the birds cannot feed (this is only for a few minutes!!!!!) they will flutter beautifully just at the entrance.....After four summers of
frustration and poor shots I reeled off 36 exposures in just under 5 minutes with about 16 of them OK for inclusion in my "garden club" slide program....I expect they are good enough to get a D- from Wendell....

I have heard of those who feed mealworms, staging shots where they feed on top of one camera and shoot the picture of the "blues" with another camera and these are adorable.....The one I saw had the caption "OK kids, say worm!" With a lot of luck and feeding on the top of the "working" camera you might end up with a full frontal shot of the "blue" as it comes in for a landing on the camera/feeding station....Most of these ideas really work better with video cameras as they capture all the movement/sounds and you can edit 4 or five hours of tape into the good short segments...KK

PS maybe Wendell will share film types!!!! I use Kodachrome 64 for true colors and the old Ektachrome when I wanted a really dark blue "bluebird" as Kodachrome shows more reds/yellows and Ektachrome was heavy on blue saturation. This has been replaced with Elitechrome now.


Subj: PhotoWorkshop(Keith&Sandy)
Date: 1/23/00 11:14:55 AM Central Standard Time
From: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net (Wendell Long)
Sender: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu

My Bluebird Photographic Workshop by way of the Internet will take a one week break next week, because the leader(me) is stuck in the snow in his back field and his overalls are filled with ice and snow and field mice! He awaits the arrival of a Red-tailed hawk to come to his rescue!

In the meantime, I am going to beg Keith and Sandy Kridler to join in presenting some of the finer points of Bluebird Photography. (Rumor has it--now I have no facts--that Keith was caught in the jungles of Africa when he was a staff photographer for National Geographic Magazine back in the 30s during the depression, photographing something other than a bluebird? Sandy claims those rumors are without foundation and were created to hurt Keith's reputation in the Mt. Pleasant community--a community with above agerage standards. I would never doubt Sandy. But Keith, well I think Sandy feeds him a bunch of that stuff he writes and she lets him take the credit! But don't tell him I said so. All I know for sure is that one of my buddies down there in Longview a former Baptist preacher, told me that Sandy found Keith out in the shed look at old National Geographic Magazine copies of years ago and that he claimed to be doing "M. D. Smith mean looking bluebird research." Now I ask you does that make good sense.

Anyway, Keith writes of Bluebird photography in his recent post. And I must say, as usual, he makes very good sense with his tips for Bluebird Photography. As far as a grade is concerned sounds closer to an A than a D. I would like to join in the Amen corner on a couple of points. The importance of birdwatching before photographing will save time and expense and get better results. Certain flight patterns are set and repeated and will allow you to guess the flight. I usually plant dead trees about 50 ft or so from the nest box where the bluebirds want to land before making final approach to the box when feeding. They are pretty dependable when feeding. Many times the male will "scout" if he is not carrying a bug and fly the test pattern before giving permission to the female to come on down with the bug(much and Keith and Sandy do ). Other times both will have food and one sit on top while other is inside etc. The point being simply once the behavior has been learned the photography may begin in earnest.

The question on film types. I don't have a favorite except I need one that fits the situation(yeah I know ole situation ethics) Well, when I worked my
NY High fashion studio for the Paris houses I made absolute statements such as "tease the lens" and stuff. But bluebird photography doesn't require
that. It is much more relaxing!

So my film ranges from Fuji Velvia 50 ISO to Tri-X400 B&W. The two I have used mostly would be Kodak Kodachrome 64 and Kodak color film 200 speed. But it depends on lens speed, light, direction, movement,tripod, handheld,etc.My best bud, the best shooter I know, uses new Kodak 100vs
pro.film almost for everything. My daughters are into the video as Keith mentions he likes to use. I have made an effort to remain uninformed about video. Just do not have the interest or ability to do it.

I want to yell one more Amen from the corner. That is where Mr K speaks of using a 50mm setup if that is what you have right now. Having the interest
and getting started is the important thing! I started with a baby brownie plastic box years ago(though I lost the camera along the way) and still have some good negatives from those years. Photos of my pals.

One more consideration on the it depends thing. What are you shooting for? That is Computer screen, magazine, newspaper, snapshots for your own fun,
slide shows for groups, large reproductions for display, etc. All that will help you decide what film to choose.

I use digital too, but not when shooting birds. I and or the equipment or both not good enuf yet, but soon will be, but far too expensive for my use now. However digital is convenient for test shots to preview on computer but mine are not for final shots.

Anyway, I won't be here when I get out of the snow next week, I will be attending the KK National Geographic Work Shed viewing old Magazines for special features to be held just outside the city limits of Mt Pleasant 121 miles east of Dallas, sixty one miles southwest of Texarkana! Where it will be a pleasant 55 F.

Here in Southwest Ohio it is a pleasant 22 degrees F.

Wendell Long
Bluebird Photographer
And former Honorary co-chairperson,
Exacta community of SLRs


Subj: Re: Bluebirds in the snow!
Date: 1/23/00 11:02:46 PM Central Standard Time
From: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net (Wendell Long)


At 10:31 PM 1/23/00 -0800, you wrote:
I have done it before and it make me very mad.
I hope you can get some Pics Monday.

Maynard R Sumner
Flint, Michigan

On Sun, 23 Jan 2000 09:16:45 EST CBCHRISTIE"at"aol.com writes:Had a very special site yesterday at the bird bath. Three bluebirds (two males and a female) decided to stop by for a drink. First bluebirds I've seen all winter in my area (Potterville Michigan). Got the camera out (35 mm with zoom lens) and took 14 great pics. One problem though, my camera said I had taken 13 PICS so I figured I had plenty of film to take the 14 pics.
Wrong! After taking the pics I went to change the roll of film and found out there wasn't any in the camera to start with. How disappointing, sure hope they come back today, I have three cameras with different lens on each and all loaded with film this time! Bluebirds in the snow, not much else in this world that is so beautiful.

CLARENCE B CHRISTIE
POTTERVILLE MICHIGAN
TEMP 22 WITH LIGHT WINDS AND A DUSTING OF SNOW

clarence and maynard posts.

Yes we all have done that and make us very mad. If you have not done it yet you will. I have also taken lots of pics with middle gray snow!! Then my ole pal, Ansel Adams, clued me in. He was a good but hard teacher. He says to me "Hey dumbo," that was his pet name for me before simple, he says don't you know the camera meters see middle gray when it's white or black, doesn't matter it will expose for middle gray. I use to wonder why my snow looked so dirty and my black looked so faded. Auto middle gray. Anyway, what a big letdown from the excitement when you open that camera body and nothing, no film, not even gray snow! So, my brothers in arms in the photo wars do this when they are on an important shoot,such as bluebirds in snow. On back of camera post the end of the film box by whatever means possible if film is loaded. If film is exposed and rewound turn over box to plain side. If no film in camera at all, then no post on back of body says load me! I know you gota remember to change the notice.

You wanta talk mad, another thing--camera on tripod in vertical position and you try to rewind film backward and wonder whats wrong with this thing 'till the handle breaks. OK OK so u have auto rewind--excuse me. Bluebirds have flown away anyway when they hear that thing going mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.

Wendell Long...

Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2000 20:00:13 EST
From: RWil2654"at"aol.com
Subject: Re: Bird Blinds

HI List can anyone give me a web site that has designs for bird blind in nature centers? I need something that doesn't look like a homeless person built it out of plywood. I need this information quite soon as they want to build plywood binds in a beautiful place and they will not be compatible with the surrounding habitat.

Bob Wilson
2654 Sperber Lane
Grand Junction, CO 81506
39* 06.21N
108*33.61 W
4,635 elevation
http://www.crosswinds.net/~bluebirdbob/
http://www.dnr.state.co.us/wildlife/volunteer/bluebirdproject.htm

Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2000 20:54:58 EST
From: RWil2654"at"aol.com
Subject: Re; Wildlife Center Blinds

What I am looking for is a blind design for a Nature Center than would hold at lest 15-20 kids and handicapped accessible.

Bob Wilson...
Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2000 23:30:39 -0600
From: "Fread Loane"
Subject: Re: Unobtrusive Bird Blind

A very effective and natural blind for birding can be constructed from four lengths of soft wire and a quanity of dry grasses or rushes. In my country, we use a wild rush that is called "Slough Hay". It grows in riverbottoms along fields in great quanity. Most of it will stand approximately four feet in height and can be easily cut with a scythe.

To Form the Blind:
You will need two pair of soft wires. Six foot lengths are easy to work with. Lay each pair of wires on the ground, approximately two feet apart, and secure the end of each pair by simply twisting them together with a pair of pliers.

Now cut you a quantity of 3-4' reeds, rushes, or grasses. Have the "cutter" bring these to you, attempting to keep the material all lying in one direction. Take a big handful of the material and place it between the strands of one pair of the wires and simply twist the wires a couple of times to hold it firmly in place. Now, do the same with the other pair of wire strands. As you "weave" this grass mat, try to keep the bottom of the mat all the same length. When you run out of wire,
simply twist more wire to the other strands.

Just remember that you most likely will build this on site of where the materials are gathered and will then have to carry it to your vehicle......so, don't get carried away with too long of woven grass mats! To carry them, simply roll them up!

A simple frame of sticks can be wired together and the lengths of woven mat attached to them. They can form the sides and the roof of the blind very efficiently and should last at least for one season of normal wear.

I hope my description is of value here and is understood. In essence, your grass mat will be similar to the old roll down 'split bamboo' sun shades that used to be so popular on porches-----only you will be using grasses, sedges, reeds etc. with only two pair of weaver wires to hold the material tightly together.

This is an easily made blind requiring only the wire (which used to be free in the days of baling wire!). It can be portable and set up quickly. It will also blend in with the surroundings quite effectively if you use some cut limbs to further disguise the "block" form.

Two people can assemble such grass mats quite easily and quickly.

Fread J. Loane
Tulsa, Oklahoma
A Mourning Dove has built her nest in a Yaupon Holly and has a single egg!


Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2000 22:48:14 EST
From: Tsapling"at"aol.com
Subject: re photos

I am passing on a hint that I got from someone that when you have a photo that you want to last, to take the time and get special glass cut for the frame that screens out the UV rays. It is inexpensive. I just did it today for the photos that Wendell Long allowed us to download, and got some of my more important family photos done at the same time.

Tina


Date: Sun, 20 Feb 2000 17:29:53 -0500
From: "wlc164wlc"
To:
Subject: Photographing Bluebirds

Hello Lynn (from Reading) and fellow bluebirders.
Can anyone share experience and suggestions as to type, brand of digital camcorders, i.e. what to look for for good picture quality, ease of use, distance of lens, etc.; would appreciate very much as I my husband and I have been checking into and don't really know what we're looking for. We can only assume digital is the way to go if we want to eventually see pictures and/or videos on the TV/VCR and/or computer. Thanks much!
Wanda, SE PA


Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2000 10:07:32 -0600
From: "Wright, Merlin C." mcwrigh"at"nppd.com
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: RE: Bird Blinds

www.cabelas.com

Merlin Wright at Brownville Nebraska

HI List can anyone give me a web site that has designs for bird blind in nature centers? I need something that doesn't look like a homeless person built it out of plywood. I need this information quite soon as they want to build plywood binds in a beautiful place and they will not be compatible with the surrounding habitat.

Bob Wilson
2654 Sperber Lane


Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 18:17:25 -0400
From: "Paul Murray" paul"at"fifthdaycreations.com
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Photographing Bluebirds

Will the flash from a camera hurt the baby bluebirds eyes in anyway?

Paul Fifth Day Creations.com...


Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 07:36:22 EDT
From: "Rwatts" rwatts"at"mymailstation.com
Subject: Re:Photographing Bluebirdsorig. Message

I don't think so, unless you really overdid the studio shots ;-) Seriously, if it doesn't hurt to open the top of a box on a sunny day, I wouldn't think the one flash would hurt. you might even find that you can get some decent shots without the flash. The first year I had bluebirds, I snapped a photo almost every day (over-monitoring, or what?). Some were with flash, if it was a grey day, but most were without; they weren't bad. I wonder if anyone else who takes more professional photos has ideas? (I was using a simple point-and-shoot camera from on top of the horse, not a tripod.)
Rhonda
Wilton, N.H.


Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 06:47:24 -0500
From: "Bill Darnell" bdarnel3"at"bellsouth.net
Subject: Re:Photographing Bluebirds

I am not a professional, but I don't believe I have ever seen a bird act like it had even seen the flash!
Bill ...


Date: Sat, 08 Jul 2000 13:05:38 -0400
From: Don Cragin
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Bluebirds incubating 10 days!

Eastern Bluebirds have been incubating now for 10 days! The eggs should hopefully hatch in the next few days or so.

I am so excited. I have been 'blue-birding' now for about 3 years, but all my boxes have only been occupied by Chickadees, Titmice, and Swallows, so this is exciting!

I am a bird photographer, and I was wondering how to get photos of the babies after they hatch. The top comes off on this bluebird box (unlike the side doors) so I can look down into the box. I know that after the babies are 12 days old, you shouldn't look inside, because the babies could prematurely leave the nest, but I was wondering if I could get a few photos of the babies the first few days. I am just looking for 1, maybe 2 photos, and I will only be there for less than 30 seconds, focus the camera, depress the shutter, nothing else than that. Is this ok to do? Like I said, I would be there less than a minute.

Thanks for any helpful input;

Derek Cragin
Limington, Maine
dcragin"at"pivot.net


Date: Sun, 09 Jul 2000 07:31:15 -0500
From: Kathleen Oschwald
Subject: Re: photographing baby birds

Dan, I have one top-opening box and took the opportunity this year to snap a few pictures of one clutch of little eastern bluebirds. If you are quick about it, it should cause no problems.


Date: Wed, 12 Jul 2000 12:15:05 -0400
From: Don Cragin dcragin"at"pivot.net
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Bluebirds nest

Somebody mentioned to me a few days ago that it is ok to take the nest out of the box for photos. She said she showed children the nest by taking it out. Without a flash, I can't get adequate photos in the box. So, I've decided it's better not to get photos inside the box than to have something wrong with the babies. But, is it ok to take the nest out for a few seconds, snap a photo, and put it back in as soon as I took it out? Will this harm the babies? I will not take the nest out if the sun beaming down.
Thank you for any help,
Derek Cragin
Limington, Maine
dcragin"at"pivot.net


Date: Wed, 12 Jul 2000 11:33:15 -0700
From: "Dusty Bleher" dusty"at"fsinc.com
Subject: Re: Bluebirds nest

... Go ahead and do it. It won't harm the young. A few seconds of sun exposure also won't prove harmful to the young. We do it all the time as we chronical some of our boxes. Have fun as you record your nest's progress for posterity... How about sharing some of them when you're done?

Best regards,
Dusty Bleher
San Jose, Ca....


Date: Mon, 14 May 2001 09:04:47 -0400
From: Haleya Priest mablue"at"gis.net
Subject: Pix of Cavity Nesters

Haleya Priest Amherst MA
Our webmaster/photographer has just placed photos of our EABL cavity nesters in the old poplar tree at our MBA website. They can each be clicked for a larger indivdual pix. Sorry - my computer is too old and clunky to send them individually.... :-)

Update: They still haven't fledged - we sure are confused by what must have been going on the other day. Holding our breath until take-off! :-)
http://herper.tripod.com/mbahome.html


Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 13:06:39 -0500
From: Wendell Long mrsimple"at"go-concepts.com
Subject: Workshop Survey for Wild Bird Photographers Only.

Friends,

Anyone interested in getting together for a wildlife photo workshop this year?

I am considering the following to determine the amount of interest if any? Please let me know your thoughts?

The 2002 schedule for my MrSimple Photographic Workshops is as follows:
1. Caesar Creek, Waynesville, Ohio: Eastern Bluebird and White-Tailed Deer, April 22- 23.
2. Wendell and Sunapee, New Hampshire: Red-Breasted Nuthatch and Moose, May 23-24.
3. Siasconset, Nantucket Island, Mazzzchusetts: Shore Birds, June20-21.
4. Wilson Ponds and Moosehead Lake, Greenville, Maine, Loon and Moose, July 15--16.
5. Trinity Bay, Conception Bay and St. John's, Newfoundland: Atlantic Puffin and Gull, August 1-2.
The cost remains the same as last year($20. for the 2 days plus your own travel, room and board, and any shopping expense you may choose to have). The workshop size has not changed: Limit is 5 people per workshop) Equipment needed minimum one camera and lens. Recommended two camera bodies, 2 lens--one lens at least 400mm f4.

E-mail if you have any interest. I have one opening remaining in each workshop except the Waynesville location is filled, will add you if you want on standby.

These workshops are designed for Seniors only and will require some hiking but not as much as a teenager is capable of doing. Seniors are defined as age 40 plus(sorry). If a couple wants to include a child(must be at least age 12). Limit one child per couple. Grandparents are not allowed(the Grandparents part is a joke--grin required here)

I also need one able bodied assistant as a gaffer(whatever that is) for heavy equipment. Gaffer does not pay my $20. fee. Big deal huh?

I limit these workshops to Bluebird-L members only, so you will know some people and will want to avoid certain ones depending who has signed up. I cannot imagine being in the same group as Bruce Burdett for example! (Hope that is a joke---is he ok, I have not heard from him since he was reading his new camera instructions last month). Has anyone heard from Bruce or Fread??

Let me know, if you just have to attend a workshop that is full, I will let you teach in my spot. But I won't pay.

All the foregoing is a survey to determine the amount of interest only--nothing is set in concrete yet, but if there is enough interest we will lay plans accordingly. Write me and express your thoughts please? Look forward to hearing from the photo buffs on the list. Will let you know what the results are in a future posting. Thanks for your time. Should there be enough real and sincere interest in such an affair, any one or more, we will form a committee of the whole and lay specific plans accordingly. This does not have the blessing nor the wrath of Cornell or NABS. Just something I want to do with my pals on the Bluebird List, and am trying to decide the locations where greatest number of people show the most likely spots where they would be able to attend considering the travel and total expense and distance etc. Thanks Again for responding.

Sincerely,
Wendell Long
Waynesville, Ohio


Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2002 17:52:48 -0500
From: Wendell Long mrsimple"at"go-concepts.com
Subject: New E-mail Photo Discussion Group Announced.

Friends,

I have received a suggestion that I start an old fashioned Internet discussion group, similar to the original Wendell Long Institute, but limited to those who enjoy Nature and Wildlife photography, especially those who photograph bluebirds and other cavity nesters and use either a digital or film camera. I am more than happy to announce the organization of such a discussion list. We will keep it simple, as we did the first one. All you need to do is send me your email address and I will add it to  the group and provide you with a list of the members and their email addresses. When you post you just email the group list from your email address book and all of us will read your post. If you want to say something good about a member and don't want them to see it you just leave that person's address out of your post when you send.

Only interested members of the Bluebird-L and the WLInst are invited to join. Just send me the E-mail address you want to use for the discussion group and tell me to count you in or sign you up or something original like that. We will exchange our own photographs if you want and also exchange our own great photography of wildlife. This will be the home group for the Wildlife photography nuts--or semi-nuts.

I hope you will join before the group is filled. We will have to limit ourselves to 30 members in order for all to have plenty of space to talk and discuss as much as is needed. I am especially interested in those who have shown such a great interest in photography in the past and have been taking or learning to take photos of wild birds. I will acknowledge your membership by return E-mail. I think you will enjoy this. Thank you. I look forward to your response.

Sincerely,
Wendell Long
Waynesville, Ohio

PS: The Name of the Group will be:The Natural Selection of Wildlife Photographers.
So far we have one member: Wendell Long email is: mrsimple"at"go-concepts.com


Date: Sun, 21 Apr 2002 17:49:28 -0400
Subject: Pennell Turner?
From: Brenda Best jabbest"at"americu.net

I was recently given an educational kit that was put together and distributed by NABS. I can find no year on it. In this kit are four numbered and signed prints by Pennell Turner. One is of male and female Eastern Bluebirds, one is male Mountain bluebird, one is male Western Bluebird feeding a nestling, and the last is of three fledglings. I did an Internet search to find more information on Pennell Turner, but was unsuccessful. Can anyone on the list tell me who Pennell Turner was?
Brenda Best
Durhamville, NY
jabbest"at"americu.net

Nature Club of Central New York
http://www.natureclubofcny.com


Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 12:27:48 -0500
Subject: Bluebird Photo Advice Needed
From: Marie Hicks mariehicks"at"earthlink.net

Marie Hicks Marietta, GA March 6, 2003

I am interested in photographing nesting activity inside a nest box that opens from the side. However, I don't want to startle and/or scare off the birds inside. How do you open this type of box to monitor or photograph without freaking out the birds? There is no glass partition inside the drop down door on this box. Does anyone have suggestions for a nonstressful photo method, ie, fiber optic camera, etc.? Are the top opening boxes better for monitoring and photographing? I have noticed some awesome photos on links from this list and would greatly appreciate any advice on photographing bluebirds in general. My bluebirds have a real "social anxiety disorder" when I try to get close, with or without a camera! I really envy you guys who have a friendly rapport with your bluebirds! I am having some success "buying their friendship" with mealworms. Maybe if I wear a bright blue jacket and a red vest... :-)

Thanks for this great bluebird info source!!

Marie (enjoying bluebirds in the Atlanta 'burbs!)

Morning Light Photography, Inc.
http://www.morning-light.com


Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 14:29:38 -0500
Subject: Re: Bluebird Photo Advice Needed
From: Maynard R Sumner m-r-sumner"at"juno.com

My slot box in the back yard opens on the side. I have photos of babies bluebirds. As far as I know, without putting bands on them, this is the same male and female I have had before in this box. This is why I say it is the same ones. As I am taking the photos the male or female will set on my head. Some times as I am cutting the grass the bluebirds will ride on my head looking for some thing to eat.

Maynard Sumner
Flint, MI...


From: Okatsam"at"aol.com
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 18:32:36 EST
Subject: Re: Bluebird Photo Advice Needed

Malinda Mastako
SE Michigan

Hello Marie! Taking photos inside a nestbox can be a little tricky. I shot the photos for the nesting ezzzy in "The Bluebird Monitor's Guide". The nestlings had daily photo sessions and quickly became accustomed to it (as did their parents). A side opening box presents several problems, though. First, the roof will prevent sunlight from entering to light your subject. You will most likely then need a flash. The roof also makes it difficult to get a good angle, reach the camera in, get your eye to the camera, etc. Secondly, the built up sides of the nestcup will shield much of what you are trying to photograph, especially when the young are newly hatched. Later on in age, they will "hunker down" to hide when you open the box and it will be a problem again. Does your box have screws on the roof so that you could remove it for the photos? I had a Springer Chalet style nestbox for the book photos and took the roof off for the nestshots, suing a step stool for extra height. The side could be either removed or swung up independently of the roof for blowfly checks when needed. I believe Wild Birds Unlimited also makes a nestbox that opens both ways. If you already have a nest going, you might want to keep these things in mind for the future and have a more user friendly box up and ready to go a week or so before the fledging of this brood. You also asked about how you might cure your pair's "social anxiety" and get them more used to you being around the box. I had the advantage of a well experienced pair of blues who knew me, though each bird has it's own individual personality so your results may not be the same. I spent a LOT of time outside with them, sitting quietly, doing chores around the yard, filling their feeder and daily checking the box as we went along. It's great if you can monitor when you already see the female out of the box. When you approach the box it helps to have a routine that they can accustom themselves to. Whistle as you approach, step to the side and tap on the box to give a warning, and then open slowly. If you are eye to eye with "mama" just close the door and wait for another opportunity. She may sit tight, so try not to freak out....at least until you shut the door and get some distance! They quickly realize that you mean no harm and belong in the area. We had a busy backyard with kids activities, a trampoline, mowers, you name it, and the blues never batted an eye over any of it. Though mine never sat on my head while I took photos, as Maynard Sumner's blues do, (I LOVED THAT POST, BY THE WAY!!) we developed a rhythm of respect for eachother's activities and adjusted accordingly. They usually sat a few feet away during nest checks, or used the check as an opportunity to grab a fast meal. It will take an investment of time on your part, but it is well worth it. I have very fond memories of watching them for hours, taking notes on their activities and anticipating the future events and milestones. Having photos to document the stages will make it even more meaningful for you. I hope it works out and that you will have many nesting opportunites this year!

Malinda Mastako
SE Michigan


From: "Phil Berry" phil4643"at"msn.com
Subject: Re: Bluebird Photo Advice Needed
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 17:52:56 -0600

Marie,
I use a digital Nikon, and none of the birds care one whit whether I am standing there with the door open when I do it. Not to worry. Phil Berry Gulf Breeze, Florida...


Date: Sat, 08 Mar 2003 16:07:41 -0500
To: bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu
From: Wendell Long mrsimple"at"go-concepts.com
Subject: Bluebird on Maynard's Head

Maynard Sumner, your post about the bluebirds perching on your head while you are mowing the lawn or photographing them at their nesting boxes---well I just have not been able to get that picture out of my mind and I have a few questions and special requests if you will allow such. First of all what cap or hat if any do you wear? Are you bald? Do you wear a Detroit Tigers baseball cap? Have you tried a yellow hard hat? If you wear a red one do the ruby-throated hummingbirds stop by and perch long enough to take a picture? If you have such photographs in your extensive collection, would you be kind enough to forward one to me personally attached to an email. I would be forever grateful my friend. Should you not have a photographic record of such a special moment on file, I am willing to work with you in order to put you in the photo history books. Here's the way I have it figured: I estimate it will take me about 4 hours to drive to Flint from Waynesville. So the next time you are photographing or cutting the grass would you please carry your cell phone and call me when the bluebird lights on your head. I will have my camera gear packed and will leave immediately by the most direct route, if you can guarantee me that the bird will remain perched for at least 4.5 hours(thus allowing me 30 minutes for tripod set up as you continue to mow or photograph)? I would of course expect to split the profits from the sale of such a master piece of art with you at the standard 60-40% going rate. I think it would be plenty to pay your expenses for your planned 6 months in Florida next winter. I realize this is asking a lot from you, especially if you have a small yard and will have to keep re-mowing over and over again until I can get there, but I think all our friends on the bluebird-L discussion list would be willing to pay top dollar for such a photograph, don't you?

Please post your thoughts by return post as soon as you have the time. I realize you are a man of few words and that you make each word count, so I do not expect a long reply or a lengthy contract for such an adventure.

Sincerely Yours, your pal,
Wendell Long
Waynesville, Ohio

PS: And of course I shall reimburse you for the expense of lawn mower gasoline. Fair is fair. And feel free to discuss with your Sunday School Class before making a final decision since I would be crossing state lines for such a project and I am not sure what ethics may apply in such a case.


From: rindfleisch12"at"elknet.net
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 13:37:10 EST
Subject: Shutterbugs and bluebirds

Here’s a question for all you shutterbugs….
How do you take a picture of a blue when it’s perched on your camera?

Last spring, I purchased a 500 mm lens for my camera and could hardly wait to use it. It was a beautiful sunny day. Packed up my gear and the new lens, a chair and planted myself to get a super pix while the EABL’s were just starting their nest building.

Everything is set-up – tri-pod secure, camera & lens focused on the house. Time to get comfortable and wait for the little couple – and with just one click, I’ll have my perfect shot upon their arrival. Right?

About 30-45 minutes of patient, quiet waiting, I realized that I had nothing to drink. I can’t go thirsty! Besides, the blues were in the nearby trees still, deciding if it was safe to return to their house and finish building their nest. I didn’t think my departure would be a big deal for a quick visit to the house and resume my wait with beverage in hand.

I was about 20-30 steps away when I could hear the familiar chirp from where I was just sitting! Sure enough, I turn and there he is, right on top of my camera ready to get a shot of the little lady in their new home! If only I would have had another camera to take a pix of the little blue photographer. It was too funny. I guess he liked the viewing advantage, as he stayed there for some time. Looked like a Picture Pefect perch!

Too cold today (-3 F). Even my little ducks were shivering this morning.

Thankfully, a warm up is on the way.

Good luck shutter bugs,
Cheryl - SE Wisconsin

On Sat, 8 Mar 2003 14:59:28 -0500 Marie Hicks wrote:

Thanks for all the wonderful encouragement and advice about
photographing bluebirds.

Bluebird Photography


Subj: Bluebird Photography(Fact & Fiction)
Date: 1/4/00 8:41:49 PM Central Standard Time
From: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net (Wendell Long)
Sender: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Reply-to: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net
To: bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu

Dear Loving, Giving and Forgiving Friends and Pals All--Hear ya, hear ye, please lend me your ear!

My bride changed to Gilbertson from Peterson, Kentucky Slot, Nabs boxes because she liked them.

I don't claim to be a bird expert here on this list of the most informed birding people of all. I do claim to be among the worlds great Bluebird photographers. Those of you who are graduates of my Advanced Bluebird Photography Internet Workshop know how good you are after completing you homework. You also know how much those payments on your new lens hurts.

I do prefer the Gilbertson when I am photographing at the nest box. For several reasons, included among them:

1. When I need more natural light for greater speed, I gain 1/2 f stop by the bird being near a reflective surface, allowing me to use a slower film speed and achieve an accurate special Bluebird color, of which there is none other so beautiful.

2. The box is kewl in fashion and ambiance.

3. It allows a loving pair in a flattering position for a cover page on top of the flat top.

4. It has a good leading line perspective when one bird is at the hole and the other is looking down from top.

5. It is flattering background as the bird flies away from the hole when you are shooting from the front toward the box.

6. It is a better size when shooting within 9ft from the hole with a lens between 300-600mm range.

7. The bird when on final landing approach has a pleasing set of the wings and legs compared to other boxes. A set that resembles the set when approaching a natural nest cavity in a tree or fence post.

8. Lastly but not leastly, it blocks less view when shooting from behind and getting in tight for a close up just before the bird enters with it's bug.

Now, I am not as stupid as I look and I realize if you don't photograph you do not care at all about this and those of you who paint already know all about it. But sometimes I am amazed in some of my Internet Bluebird Workshops, in my mind, for Senior Advanced Professional Wildlife Photographers, how little they pay attention to the detail around the bird. Believe me, after one week here on the Ridge, they notice the Bluebird box or I kick 'em out and send them home without their breakfast grits! That shows 'em! Thunderation, they could be wasting their time in another workshop!

But for the few who do enjoy photographing Bluebirds in a serious and enjoyable way and are addicted to it as one has to become, consider your box in your photograph if you are doing bird/box combinations for advertising, internet, books, editors, magazines or just plain ole fun as your hobby. And just for fun and proof to yourself, measure your graycard next to a Gilbertson vs other boxes and see what you come up with.

All serious Bluebird Photographers on the list, feel free to email a small jpg attachment and I will be your critic if you are open minded and take helpful criticism easily without taking yourself seriously---only your photography ok? No charge of course--why would I charge for something I enjoy doing anyway? Same as my free internet Bluebird Photography Workshop(no charge-but limited number is 5 students at one time) But please keep your shots as small as my little screen, in the neighborhood of 13 inches. Digital, scanned, negative, positive, other; let me know what. Now you characters on here(you know who you are) don't go sending me jokes, and so called funny pics. Not looking for a bunch of comedians here, save it for the humor network. All nudes will be returned and you will be reported to Keep it Clean committee, Honorary General Chairman, former Playboy Photographer and all around great writer--Well you can guess who that is, without my naming her here!

Wendell Long
Waynesville,OH
(Tornado Watch Alert, but no tornado)
Lucked out one more time!

Good to be alive. Spirit be with those who lost loved ones to a  higher place last night and yesterday.

I am glad it was no worse for most of you in Owensboro, Kentucky  Thirty miles from me ole hometown of  my heart---Centertown, Ky. where we use to
hide under our honeysuckle vine tunnels and  shoot at passing vehicles, trains, tractors, cars with  our little stick bows and arrows. We were rebels without a cause, but James Dean represented us later. As did Holden and his sis and pal Phoebe!

Thanks to the committee for publishing my poem--The Bluebird Season. My best work by far. I am honored to have it among the premier writers.


Subj: Beginning Bluebird Photography(plus simply good to be alive isn't it)
Date: 1/17/00 3:52:00 PM Central Standard Time
From: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net (Wendell Long)
Sender: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Reply-to: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net
To: bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu

Friends:

All my box holes are the same if I use the same rule: 1 9/16 man that is close to 1 1/2 about that much }{oops about 1/2 that much.That looks more like 1/8 rather than 1/16 on my screen. They seem to be okay.

I have been ask to increase my beginning Nestbox Internet Bluebird Photography Workshop to accomodate members of the list and those interested in Bluebird Photography but have no experience or almost none. I have one open slot for such a student of Beginning Nestbox Bluebird Photography Internet Workshop. Open to someone on the bluebird list at no charge. This is for beginners, if you are advanced and/or experienced bird photographer this is not the right workshop for you. Here, I assign a total of 5 photos for you to complete, as one is completed you then go on to the next until all 5 have been made to your satisfaction. Simple as this:

1. I email you an attachment for you to make a photograph at the nestbox as similiar as you can get to mine. Here in number 1 we start out easy--just a close up of a bluebird at the nest box hole. (Just a dull shot as one friend called it) Your choice of equipment and film or digital.

2. Next shot same shot but more interesting in some way by expression, action, movement as you judge to be.

3. Next, two bluebirds at the nestbox.

4. Bluebird leaving the nest in flight.

5. Bluebird approaching nest with wings set for landing or just before with wings in interesting flight pattern.

Things we try to accomplish will be: Sharp, bright, clear photos. Framed as close as possible but still maintain good focus and color balance. Natural look, without flash or computer manipulation--just as they come from the camera. Improvement from number 1 assignment thru number 5 when compared with pleasing and interesting composotion and technical image effect.

Maximum of two weeks given to complete each assignment from time you receive my attachment example.

If this is something you want to do, drop me an email withing the next day, telling me of your interest. I have only one opening since I dont run large workshops, so this kind of learning is based more on the individually guided education and interest of the person, but the basic 5 items I list must be completed before any other work is done.

Why do I do this someone ask? It's fun! I enjoy it! And it fits my joy of living. That is giving=growth and learning=joy and growth=freedom of spirit. Sorry, I don't have anything to sell or buy.

I must add my grandaughter is doing very well thank you to those who let me brag to you.

If you want to be added to waiting list for the beginning workshop let me know your timeframe and I will let you know if we can work it out.

For those who ask about my creative writing workshop, I don't do that one anymore since my diagnosis of parkinson's and wife's MS.(I would write it out, but I never learned to spell it). I Ran outa time for teaching, now trying to spend more time learning how good life really can be! Wish I were sixteen again and as smart as our lister who said he/she was 14 yrs old and expressed the joy of helping his grandpa with bluebirding. If you missed his post, you missed one of the most thrilling pieces. What hope he gave us about what wonderful young people are around today! Plus I like the way he tells us who he is when he writes! He knows who he is and by gollie he let's us know too. Thank you--you know who you are. I just wonder who gave you such a good start in life? Did anyone save his post I am talking about? I don't have his permission to use his name or I would just blurt it out right here, stand up on my bluebird box and give a speech in his honor!!

But a hint would be, if I remember it right, he has the first name of a big country songwriter and singer. Bless his little pea pickin heart. No no not Tennesse Earnie Ford nor Tennessee Williams either.

By the way,speaking of williams, to Jim Williams, Are you still our editor. If you are I miss hearing from you now and then. I don't mean the notes where you spoke of my clutter and rambling LOL. I mean just saying Hi, are you ok?? I see your name on the Bluebird. And yes save some Dreams for the future.

Wendell Long

PS Boy it was cold. I sat in my van and cheated this morning, but the titmouse came in and posed anyway. He doesn't stay long though--he just grabs that seed and whoosh he's gone. But the sun went in and I was using 50 iso Velvia so he was a little fast for me--had to go down to 2.8f and 125 shutter. It's rough.

PSS: I have spent lots of time on the internet,different list, chat rooms, IMs, on and on for several years now and have seen many improvements both in fun and serious Internet sites. I have met more nice people and got to know some fairly well though have not met personally. But, I bet many of you can agree, you have not met a group, where all around, total character, spirit, warmth and understanding is greater anywhere than the bluebird-L! If there is such a place, please tell me for I have missed it and I will join. I am not running for office,I vote for the guy who is, I've been there(not here),but I was President of something one time, as the popular saying of the day seems to be. But I would be surprised if my feelings are not shared about this list. Thanks to Cornell and the NABS for such good work! If I were a joiner I would go out and join something right now! Well, assuming dues free of course. Ok Ok I hush, you don't have to yell!!!


Subj: Micheal D. Smith/mad bluebird
Date: 1/23/00 8:42:03 AM Central Standard Time
From: kridler"at"1starnet.com (Keith & Sandy Kridler)
Sender: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Reply-to: kridler"at"1starnet.com
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu (BLUEBIRD-L)

Keith Kridler Mt. Pleasant, Texas 120 miles east of Dallas on I-30 sixty miles southwest of Texarkana, Arkansas. A pleasant 42* F this morning!

In 1977 M.D. Smith had the photographs of "his" bluebirds published in National Geographic 151: pages 854-865.

For those interested in photo tips for Wendell's class :-) you can get by with a tripod, a decent 35 mm camera and the stock 50 mm lens. You will need a cable release, I use a cheap "air release" (a squeeze bulb that pushes air through a 60' plastic tube) to trip the shutter. An automatic advance is great so you do not have to walk up to the box and manually advance the film. With this system you can get fair close-ups by setting the camera at it's closest focus setting on the nestbox or just in front to capture the parents feeding "on the wing". Set the tripod and a fake camera up a day or two ahead of when you can take pictures...Try to chose a day with thin high clouds to reduce shadows if not using a flash. Use a high shutter speed to slow the wings and other movement.

Trying to find the information on the "research" into the "why's" of the Peterson Oval hole which Haleya asked for, I watched the videos "BLUEBIRD TRAILS" & "JEWELS OF BLUE" done for/by the Minnesota group in 1988 and they tied/staged a live Starling to the top of a nestbox to record the interaction of the bluebirds. A disruption at the nestbox will often get both parents fluttering in front of the box so a camera focused there with get both adults at the same time....If you try to get a shot of the parents feeding "on the fly" coming into the box you will most likely end up with a shot of a tail entering the hole....But if you block the inside of the box so the birds cannot feed (this is only for a few minutes!!!!!) they will flutter beautifully just at the entrance.....After four summers of
frustration and poor shots I reeled off 36 exposures in just under 5 minutes with about 16 of them OK for inclusion in my "garden club" slide program....I expect they are good enough to get a D- from Wendell....

I have heard of those who feed mealworms, staging shots where they feed on top of one camera and shoot the picture of the "blues" with another camera and these are adorable.....The one I saw had the caption "OK kids, say worm!" With a lot of luck and feeding on the top of the "working" camera you might end up with a full frontal shot of the "blue" as it comes in for a landing on the camera/feeding station....Most of these ideas really work better with video cameras as they capture all the movement/sounds and you can edit 4 or five hours of tape into the good short segments...KK

PS maybe Wendell will share film types!!!! I use Kodachrome 64 for true colors and the old Ektachrome when I wanted a really dark blue "bluebird" as Kodachrome shows more reds/yellows and Ektachrome was heavy on blue saturation. This has been replaced with Elitechrome now.


Subj: PhotoWorkshop(Keith&Sandy)
Date: 1/23/00 11:14:55 AM Central Standard Time
From: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net (Wendell Long)
Sender: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Reply-to: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net
To: bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu

Friends and Fans of the Everly Brothers!

My Bluebird Photographic Workshop by way of the Internet will take a one week break next week, because the leader(me) is stuck in the snow in his back field and his overalls are filled with ice and snow and field mice! He awaits the arrival of a Red-tailed hawk to come to his rescue!

In the meantime, I am going to beg Keith and Sandy Kridler to join in presenting some of the finer points of Bluebird Photography. (Rumor has it--now I have no facts--that Keith was caught in the jungles of Africa when he was a staff photographer for National Geographic Magazine back in the 30s during the depression, photographing something other than a bluebird? Sandy claims those rumors are without foundation and were created to hurt Keith's reputation in the Mt. Pleasant community--a community with above agerage standards. I would never doubt Sandy. But Keith, well I think Sandy feeds him a bunch of that stuff he writes and she lets him take the credit! But don't tell him I said so. All I know for sure is that one of my buddies down there in Longview a former Baptist preacher, told me that Sandy found Keith out in the shed look at old National Geographic Magazine copies of years ago and that he claimed to be doing "M. D. Smith mean looking bluebird research." Now I ask you does that make good sense.

Anyway, Keith writes of Bluebird photography in his recent post. And I must say, as usual, he makes very good sense with his tips for Bluebird Photography. As far as a grade is concerned sounds closer to an A than a D. I would like to join in the Amen corner on a couple of points. The importance of birdwatching before photographing will save time and expense and get better results. Certain flight patterns are set and repeated and will allow you to guess the flight. I usually plant dead trees about 50 ft or so from the nest box where the bluebirds want to land before making final approach to the box when feeding. They are pretty dependable when feeding. Many times the male will "scout" if he is not carrying a bug and fly the test pattern before giving permission to the female to come on down with the bug(much and Keith and Sandy do ). Other times both will have food and one sit on top while other is inside etc. The point being simply once the behavior has been learned the photography may begin in earnest.

The question on film types. I don't have a favorite except I need one that fits the situation(yeah I know ole situation ethics) Well, when I worked my
NY High fashion studio for the Paris houses I made absolute statements such as "tease the lens" and stuff. But bluebird photography doesn't require
that. It is much more relaxing!

So my film ranges from Fuji Velvia 50 ISO to Tri-X400 B&W. The two I have used mostly would be Kodak Kodachrome 64 and Kodak color film 200 speed. But it depends on lens speed, light, direction, movement,tripod, handheld,etc.My best bud, the best shooter I know, uses new Kodak 100vs
pro.film almost for everything. My daughters are into the video as Keith mentions he likes to use. I have made an effort to remain uninformed about video. Just do not have the interest or ability to do it.

I want to yell one more Amen from the corner. That is where Mr K speaks of using a 50mm setup if that is what you have right now. Having the interest
and getting started is the important thing! I started with a baby brownie plastic box years ago(though I lost the camera along the way) and still have some good negatives from those years. Photos of my pals.

One more consideration on the it depends thing. What are you shooting for? That is Computer screen, magazine, newspaper, snapshots for your own fun,
slide shows for groups, large reproductions for display, etc. All that will help you decide what film to choose.

I use digital too, but not when shooting birds. I and or the equipment or both not good enuf yet, but soon will be, but far to expensive for my use now. However digital is convient for test shots to preview on computer but mine are not for final shots.

Anyway, I won't be here when I get out of the snow next week, I will be attending the KK National Geographic Work Shed viewing old Magazines for
special features to be held just outside the city limits of Mt Pleasant 121 miles east of Dallas, sixty one miles southwest of Texarkana! Where it will be a pleasant 55 F.

Here in Southwest Ohio it is a pleasant 22 degrees F.

Wendell Long
Bluebird Photographer
And former Honorary co-chairperson,
Exacta community of SLRs


Subj: Re: Bluebirds in the snow!
Date: 1/23/00 11:02:46 PM Central Standard Time
From: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net (Wendell Long)
Sender: owner-BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Reply-to: mrsimple"at"earthlink.net
To: bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu

At 10:31 PM 1/23/00 -0800, you wrote:
I have done it before and it make me very mad.
I hope you can get some Pics Monday.

Maynard R Sumner
Flint, Michigan

On Sun, 23 Jan 2000 09:16:45 EST CBCHRISTIE"at"aol.com writes:
Had a very special site yesterday at the bird bath. Three bluebirds
(two
males and a female) decided to stop by for a drink. First bluebirds
I've
seen all winter in my area (Potterville Michigan). Got the camera
out (35 mm
with zoom lens) and took 14 great pics. One problem though, my
camera said I
had taken 13 PICS so I figured I had plenty of film to take the 14
pics.
Wrong! After taking the pics I went to change the roll of film and
found out
there wasn't any in the camera to start with. How disappointing,
sure hope
they come back today, I have three cameras with different lens on
each and
all loaded with film this time! Bluebirds in the snow, not much
else in this
world that is so beautiful.

CLARENCE B CHRISTIE
POTTERVILLE MICHIGAN
TEMP 22 WITH LIGHT WINDS AND A DUSTING OF SNOW

clarence and maynard posts.

Yes we all have done that and make us very mad. If you have not done it yet you will. I have also taken lots of pics with middle gray snow!! Then my ole pal, Ansel Adams, clued me in. He was a good but hard teacher. He says to me "Hey dumbo," that was his pet name for me before simple, he says don't you know the camera meters see middle gray when it's white or black, doesn't matter it will expose for middle gray. I use to wonder why my snow looked so dirty and my black looked so faded. Auto middle gray. Anyway, what a big letdown from the excitement when you open that camera body and nothing, no film, not even gray snow! So, my brothers in arms in the photo wars do this when they are on an important shoot,such as bluebirds in snow. On back of camera post the end of the film box by whatever means possible if film is loaded. If film is exposed and rewound turn over box to plain side. If no film in camera at all, then no post on back of body says load me! I know you gota remember to change the notice.

You wanta talk mad, another thing--camera on tripod in vertical position and you try to rewind film backward and wonder whats wrong with this thing 'till the handle breaks. OK OK so u have auto rewind--excuse me. Bluebirds have flown away anyway when they hear that thing going mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.

Wendell Long

PS: But one of the biggest letdowns is when you are stalking a Mountain Lion and wild boar and you stumble over a praying mantis, fall flat on your face and the Lion eats the Boar! That is a bad day.And you miss the action because your exposure is set on 2000 speed and your f stop is 32 and it is in a dark forrest and you are using old Kodachrome 25. And you spouse is yelling "Ordis, hurry up and get the picture, I got a hair appointment"

Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2000 20:00:13 EST
From: RWil2654"at"aol.com
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: Bird Blinds

HI List can anyone give me a web site that has designs for bird blind in nature centers? I need something that doesn't look like a homeless person built it out of plywood. I need this information quite soon as they want to build plywood binds in a beautiful place and they will not be compatible with the surrounding habitat.

Bob Wilson
2654 Sperber Lane
Grand Junction, CO 81506
(970) 242-5190
39* 06.21N
108*33.61 W
4,635 elevation
http://www.crosswinds.net/~bluebirdbob/
http://www.dnr.state.co.us/wildlife/volunteer/bluebirdproject.htm

Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2000 20:54:58 EST
From: RWil2654"at"aol.com
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re; Wildlife Center Blinds

What I am looking for is a blind design for a Nature Center than would hold at lest 15-20 kids and handicapped accessible.

Bob Wilson
2654 Sperber Lane
Grand Junction, CO 81506
(970) 242-5190
39* 06.21N
108*33.61 W
4,635 elevation
http://www.crosswinds.net/~bluebirdbob/
http://www.dnr.state.co.us/wildlife/volunteer/bluebirdproject.htm

Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2000 23:30:39 -0600
From: "Fread Loane"
To: "BLUEBIRD-L"
Subject: Re: Unobtrusive Bird Blind

A very effective and natural blind for birding can be constructed from four lengths of soft wire and a quanity of dry grasses or rushes. In my country, we use a wild rush that is called "Slough Hay". It grows in riverbottoms along fields in great quanity. Most of it will stand approximately four feet in height and can be easily cut with a scythe.

To Form the Blind:
You will need two pair of soft wires. Six foot lengths are easy to work with. Lay each pair of wires on the ground, approximately two feet apart, and secure the end of each pair by simply twisting them together with a pair of pliers.

Now cut you a quanity of 3-4' reeds, rushes, or grasses. Have the "cutter" bring these to you, attempting to keep the material all lying in one direction. Take a big handful of the material and place it between the strands of one pair of the wires and simply twist the wires a couple of times to hold it firmly in place. Now, do the same with the other pair of wire strands. As you "weave" this grass mat, try to keep the bottom of the mat all the same length. When you run out of wire,
simply twist more wire to the other strands.

Just remember that you most likely will build this on site of where the materials are gathered and will then have to carry it to your vehicle......so, don't get carried away with too long of woven grass mats! To carry them, simply roll them up!

A simple frame of sticks can be wired together and the lengths of woven mat attached to them. They can form the sides and the roof of the blind very efficiently and should last at least for one season of normal wear.

I hope my description is of value here and is understood. In essence, your grass mat will be similar to the old roll down 'split bamboo' sun shades that used to be so popular on porches-----only you will be using grasses, sedges, reeds etc. with only two pair of weaver wires to hold the material tightly together.

This is an easily made blind requiring only the wire (which used to be free in the days of baling wire!). It can be portable and set up quickly. It will also blend in with the surroundings quite effectively if you use some cut limbs to further disguise the "block" form.

Two people can assemble such grass mats quite easily and quickly.

Fread J. Loane
Tulsa, Oklahoma
A Mourning Dove has built her nest in a Yaupon Holly and has a single egg!


Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2000 22:48:14 EST
From: Tsapling"at"aol.com
To: Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: re photos

I am passing on a hint that I got from someone that when you have a photo that you want to last, to take the time and get special glass cut for the frame that screens out the UV rays. It is inexpensive. I just did it today for the photos that Wendell Long allowed us to download, and got some of my more important family photos done at the same time.Tina


Date: Sun, 20 Feb 2000 17:29:53 -0500
From: "wlc164wlc"
To:
Subject: Photographing Bluebirds

Hello Lynn (from Reading) and fellow bluebirders.
Can anyone share experience and suggestions as to type, brand of digital camcorders, i.e. what to look for for good picture quality, ease of use, distance of lens, etc.; would appreciate very much as I my husband and I have been checking into and don't really know what we're looking for. We can only assume digital is the way to go if we want to eventually see pictures and/or videos on the TV/VCR and/or computer. Thanks much!
Wanda, SE PA


Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2000 10:07:32 -0600
From: "Wright, Merlin C." mcwrigh"at"nppd.com
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: RE: Bird Blinds

www.cabelas.com

Merlin Wright at Brownville Nebraska

HI List can anyone give me a web site that has designs for bird blind in nature centers? I need something that doesn't look like a homeless person built it out of plywood. I need this information quite soon as they want to build plywood binds in a beautiful place and they will not be compatible with the surrounding habitat.

Bob Wilson
2654 Sperber Lane


Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 18:17:25 -0400
From: "Paul Murray" paul"at"fifthdaycreations.com
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Photographing Bluebirds

Will the flash from a camera hurt the baby bluebirds eyes in anyway?

,Paul

Fifth Day Creations.com
www.fifthdaycreations.com
"Put a little nature in your backyard"


Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 07:36:22 EDT
From: "Rwatts" rwatts"at"mymailstation.com
To: bluebird-l"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re:Photographing Bluebirdsorig. Message
--------------------------------------------------------------
Will the flash from a camera hurt the baby bluebirds eyes in anyway?

,Paul
____________________--------_________________________
I don't think so, unless you really overdid the studio shots ;-) Seriously, if it doesn't hurt to open the top of a box on a sunny day, I wouldn't think the one flash would hurt. you might even find that you can get some decent shots without the flash. The first year I had bluebirds, I snapped a photo almost every day (over-monitoring, or what?). Some were with flash, if it was a grey day, but most were without; they weren't bad. I wonder if anyone else who takes more professional photos has ideas? (I was using a simple point-and-shoot camera from on top of the horse, not a tripod.)
Rhonda
Wilton, N.H.


Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 06:47:24 -0500
From: "Bill Darnell" bdarnel3"at"bellsouth.net
To: rwatts"at"mymailstation.com, bluebird-l"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re:Photographing Bluebirds

I am not a professional, but I don't believe I have ever seen a bird act like it even seen the flash!
Bill

...


Date: Sat, 08 Jul 2000 13:05:38 -0400
From: Don Cragin
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Bluebirds incubating 10 days!

Eastern Bluebirds have been incubating now for 10 days! The eggs should hopefully hatch in the next few days or so.

I am so excited. I have been 'blue-birding' now for about 3 years, but all my boxes have only been occupied by Chickadees, Titmice, and Swallows, so this is exciting!

I am a bird photographer, and I was wondering how to get photos of the babies after they hatch. The top comes off on this bluebird box (unlike the side doors) so I can look down into the box. I know that after the babies are 12 days old, you shouldn't look inside, because the babies could prematurely leave the nest, but I was wondering if I could get a few photos of the babies the first few days. I am just looking for 1, maybe 2 photos, and I will only be there for less than 30 seconds, focus the camera, depress the shutter, nothing else than that. Is this ok to do? Like I said, I would be there less than a minute.

Thanks for any helpful input;

Derek Cragin
Limington, Maine
dcragin"at"pivot.net


Date: Sun, 09 Jul 2000 07:31:15 -0500
From: Kathleen Oschwald
To: Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: photographing baby birds

Dan, I have one top-opening box and took the opportunity this year to snap a few pictures of one clutch of little eastern bluebirds. If you are quick
about it, it should cause no problems.


Date: Wed, 12 Jul 2000 12:15:05 -0400
From: Don Cragin dcragin"at"pivot.net
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Bluebirds nest

Somebody mentioned to me a few days ago that it is ok to take the nest out of the box for photos. She said she showed children the enst by taking it out. Without a flash, I can't get adequate photos in the box. So, I've decided it's better not to get photos inside the box than to have something wrong with the babies. But, is it ok to take the nest out for a few seconds, snap a photo, and put it back in as soon as I took it out? Will this harm the babies? I will not take the nest out if the sun beaming down.
Thank you for any help,
Derek Cragin
Limington, Maine
dcragin"at"pivot.net


Date: Wed, 12 Jul 2000 11:33:15 -0700
From: "Dusty Bleher" dusty"at"fsinc.com
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: Bluebirds nest

...

Go ahead and do it. It won't harm the young. A few seconds of sun exposure also won't prove harmful to the young. We do it all the time as we chronical some of our boxes.

Have fun as you record your nest's progress for posterity... How about sharing some of them when you're done?

Best regards,
Dusty Bleher
San Jose, Ca.

...


Date: Mon, 14 May 2001 09:04:47 -0400
From: Haleya Priest mablue"at"gis.net
To: BLUEBIRD-L BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Pix of Cavity Nesters

Haleya Priest Amherst MA
Our webmaster/photographer has just placed photos of our EABL cavity nesters in the old poplar tree at our MBA website. They can each be clicked for a larger indivdual pix. Sorry - my computer is too old and clunky to send them individually.... :-)

Update: They still haven't fledged - we sure are confused by what must have been going on the other day. Holding our breath until take-off! :-)
http://herper.tripod.com/mbahome.html


Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 13:06:39 -0500
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu (BLUEBIRD-L)
From: Wendell Long mrsimple"at"go-concepts.com
Subject: Workshop Survey for Wild Bird Photographers Only.

Friends,

Anyone interested in getting together for a wildlife photo workshop this year?

I am considering the following to determine the amount of interest if any? Please let me know your thoughts?

The 2002 schedule for my MrSimple Photographic Workshops is as follows:
1. Caesar Creek, Waynesville, Ohio: Eastern Bluebird and White-Tailed Deer, April 22- 23.
2. Wendell and Sunapee, New Hampshire: Red-Breasted Nuthatch and Moose, May 23-24.
3. Siasconset, Nantucket Island, Mazzzchusetts: Shore Birds, June20-21.
4. Wilson Ponds and Moosehead Lake, Greenville, Maine, Loon and Moose, July 15--16.
5. Trinity Bay, Conception Bay and St. John's, Newfoundland: Atlantic Puffin and Gull, August 1-2.
The cost remains the same as last year($20. for the 2 days plus your own travel, room and board, and any shopping expense you may choose to have). The workshop size has not changed: Limit is 5 people per workshop) Equipment needed minimum one camera and lens. Recommended two camera bodies, 2 lens--one lens at least 400mm f4.

E-mail if you have any interest. I have one opening remaining in each workshop except the Waynesville location is filled, will add you if you want on standby.

These workshops are designed for Seniors only and will require some hiking but not as much as a teenager is capable of doing. Seniors are defined as age 40 plus(sorry). If a couple wants to include a child(must be at least age 12). Limit one child per couple. Grandparents are not allowed(the Grandparents part is a joke--grin required here)

I also need one able bodied assistant as a gaffer(whatever that is) for heavy equipment. Gaffer does not pay my $20. fee. Big deal huh?

I limit these workshops to Bluebird-L members only, so you will know some people and will want to avoid certain ones depending who has signed up. I cannot imagine being in the same group as Bruce Burdett for example! (Hope that is a joke---is he ok, I have not heard from him since he was reading his new camera instructions last month). Has anyone heard from Bruce or Fread??

Let me know, if you just have to attend a workshop that is full, I will let you teach in my spot. But I won't pay.

All the foregoing is a survey to determine the amount of interest only--nothing is set in concrete yet, but if there is enough interest we will lay plans accordingly. Write me and express your thoughts please? Look forward to hearing from the photo buffs on the list. Will let you know what the results are in a future posting. Thanks for your time. Should there be enough real and sincere interest in such an affair, any one or more, we will form a committee of the whole and lay specific plans accordingly. This does not have the blessing nor the wrath of Cornell or NABS. Just something I want to do with my pals on the Bluebird List, and am trying to decide the locations where greatest number of people show the most likely spots where they would be able to attend considering the travel and total expense and distance etc. Thanks Again for responding.

Sincerely,
Wendell Long
Waynesville, Ohio


Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2002 17:52:48 -0500
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu (BLUEBIRD-L)
From: Wendell Long mrsimple"at"go-concepts.com
Subject: New E-mail Photo Discussion Group Announced.

Friends,

I have received a suggestion that I start an old fashioned Internet discussion group, similar to the original Wendell Long Institute, but limited to those who enjoy Nature and Wildlife photography, especially those who photograph bluebirds and other cavity nesters and use either a digital or film camera. I am more than happy to announce the organization of such a discussion list. We will keep it simple, as we did the first one. All you need to do is send me your email address and I will add it to  the group and provide you with a list of the members and their email addresses. When you post you just email the group list from your email address book and all of us will read your post. If you want to say something good about a member and don't want them to see it you just leave that person's address out of your post when you send.

Only interested members of the Bluebird-L and the WLInst are invited to join. Just send me the E-mail address you want to use for the discussion group and tell me to count you in or sign you up or something original like that. We will exchange our own photographs if you want and also exchange our own great photography of wildlife. This will be the home group for the Wildlife photography nuts--or semi-nuts.

I hope you will join before the group is filled. We will have to limit ourselves to 30 members in order for all to have plenty of space to talk and discuss as much as is needed. I am especially interested in those who have shown such a great interest in photography in the past and have been taking or learning to take photos of wild birds. I will acknowledge your membership by return E-mail. I think you will enjoy this. Thank you. I look forward to your response.

Sincerely,
Wendell Long
Waynesville, Ohio

PS: The Name of the Group will be:The Natural Selection of Wildlife Photographers.
So far we have one member: Wendell Long email is: mrsimple"at"go-concepts.com


Date: Sun, 21 Apr 2002 17:49:28 -0400
Subject: Pennell Turner?
From: Brenda Best jabbest"at"americu.net
To: BLUEBIRD-L BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu

I was recently given an educational kit that was put together and distributed by NABS. I can find no year on it. In this kit are four numbered and signed prints by Pennell Turner. One is of male and female Eastern Bluebirds, one is male Mountain bluebird, one is male Western Bluebird feeding a nestling, and the last is of three fledglings. I did an Internet search to find more information on Pennell Turner, but was unsuccessful. Can anyone on the list tell me who Pennell Turner was?

Brenda
--
Brenda Best
Durhamville, NY
jabbest"at"americu.net

Nature Club of Central New York
http://www.natureclubofcny.com


Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 12:27:48 -0500
Subject: Bluebird Photo Advice Needed
From: Marie Hicks mariehicks"at"earthlink.net
To: Bluebird-L Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu

Marie Hicks Marietta, GA March 6, 2003

I am interested in photographing nesting activity inside a nest box that opens from the side. However, I don't want to startle and/or scare off the birds inside. How do you open this type of box to monitor or photograph without freaking out the birds? There is no glass partition inside the drop down door on this box. Does anyone have suggestions for a nonstressful photo method, ie, fiber optic camera, etc.? Are the top opening boxes better for monitoring and photographing? I have noticed some awesome photos on links from this list and would greatly appreciate any advice on photographing bluebirds in general. My bluebirds have a real "social anxiety disorder" when I try to get close, with or without a camera! I really envy you guys who have a friendly rapport with your bluebirds! I am having some success "buying their friendship" with mealworms. Maybe if I wear a bright blue jacket and a red vest... :-)

Thanks for this great bluebird info source!!

Marie (enjoying bluebirds in the Atlanta 'burbs!)

Morning Light Photography, Inc.
http://www.morning-light.com


To: bluebird-l"at"cornell.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 14:29:38 -0500
Subject: Re: Bluebird Photo Advice Needed
From: Maynard R Sumner m-r-sumner"at"juno.com

My slot box in the back yard opens on the side.
I have photos of babies bluebirds.
As far as I know, with out putting bands on them, this is the same male and female I have had before in this box.
This is why I say it is the same ones. As I am taking the photos the male or female will set on my head. Some times as I am cutting the grass the bluebirds will ride on my head looking for some thing to eat.

Maynard Sumner
Flint, MI


http://mibluebirdsociety.tripod.com
http://nabluebirdsociety.org
http://birds.cornell.edu/bluebirds 

Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. Galatians 6:7


From: Okatsam"at"aol.com
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 18:32:36 EST
Subject: Re: Bluebird Photo Advice Needed
To: mariehicks"at"earthlink.net, Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu

Malinda Mastako
SE Michigan

Hello Marie! Taking photos inside a nestbox can be a little tricky. I shot the photos for the nesting ezzzy in "The Bluebird Monitor's Guide". The nestlings had daily photo sessions and quickly became accustomed to it (as did their parents). A side opening box presents several problems, though. First, the roof will prevent sunlight from entering to light your subject. You will most likely then need a flash. The roof also makes it difficult to get a good angle, reach the camera in, get your eye to the camera, etc. Secondly, the built up sides of the nestcup will shield much of what you are trying to photograph, especially when the young are newly hatched. Later on in age, they will "hunker down" to hide when you open the box and it will be a problem again. Does your box have screws on the roof so that you could remove it for the photos? I had a Springer Chalet style nestbox for the book photos and took the roof off for the nestshots, suing a step stool for extra height. The side could be either removed or swung up independently of the roof for blowfly checks when needed. I believe Wild Birds Unlimited also makes a nestbox that opens both ways. If you already have a nest going, you might want to keep these things in mind for the future and have a more user friendly box up and ready to go a week or so before the fledging of this brood. You also asked about how you might cure your pair's "social anxiety" and get them more used to you being around the box. I had the advantage of a well experienced pair of blues who knew me, though each bird has it's own individual personality so your results may not be the same. I spent a LOT of time outside with them, sitting quietly, doing chores around the yard, filling their feeder and daily checking the box as we went along. It's great if you can monitor when you already see the female out of the box. When you approach the box it helps to have a routine that they can accustom themselves to. Whistle as you approach, step to the side and tap on the box to give a warning, and then open slowly. If you are eye to eye with "mama" just close the door and wait for another opportunity. She may sit tight, so try not to freak out....at least until you shut the door and get some distance! They quickly realize that you mean no harm and belong in the area. We had a busy backyard with kids activities, a trampoline, mowers, you name it, and the blues never batted an eye over any of it. Though mine never sat on my head while I took photos, as Maynard Sumner's blues do, (I LOVED THAT POST, BY THE WAY!!) we developed a rhythm of respect for eachother's activities and adjusted accordingly. They usually sat a few feet away during nest checks, or used the check as an opportunity to grab a fast meal. It will take an investment of time on your part, but it is well worth it. I have very fond memories of watching them for hours, taking notes on their activities and anticipating the future events and milestones. Having photos to document the stages will make it even more meaningful for you. I hope it works out and that you will have many nesting opportunites this year!

Malinda Mastako
SE Michigan


From: "Phil Berry" phil4643"at"msn.com
To: mariehicks"at"earthlink.net, Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Re: Bluebird Photo Advice Needed
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 17:52:56 -0600

Marie,
I use a digital Nikon, and none of the birds care one whit whether I am standing there with the door open when I do it. Not to worry. Phil Berry Gulf Breeze, Florida

From: Marie Hicks mariehicks"at"earthlink.net
Reply-To: mariehicks"at"earthlink.net
To: Bluebird-L Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Bluebird Photo Advice Needed
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 12:27:48 -0500

...


Date: Sat, 08 Mar 2003 16:07:41 -0500
To: bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu
From: Wendell Long mrsimple"at"go-concepts.com
Subject: Bluebird on Maynard's Head

Maynard Sumner, your post about the bluebirds perching on your head while you are mowing the lawn or photographing them at their nesting boxes---well I just have not been able to get that picture out of my mind and I have a few questions and special requests if you will allow such. First of all what cap or hat if any do you wear? Are you bald? Do you wear a Detroit Tigers baseball cap? Have you tried a yellow hard hat? If you wear a red one do the ruby-throated hummingbirds stop by and perch long enough to take a picture? If you have such photographs in your extensive collection, would you be kind enough to forward one to me personally attached to an email. I would be forever grateful my friend. Should you not have a photographic record of such a special moment on file, I am willing to work with you in order to put you in the photo history books. Here's the way I have it figured: I estimate it will take me about 4 hours to drive to Flint from Waynesville. So the next time you are photographing or cutting the grass would you please carry your cell phone and call me when the bluebird lights on your head. I will have my camera gear packed and will leave immediately by the most direct route, if you can guarantee me that the bird will remain perched for at least 4.5 hours(thus allowing me 30 minutes for tripod set up as you continue to mow or photograph)? I would of course expect to split the profits from the sale of such a master piece of art with you at the standard 60-40% going rate. I think it would be plenty to pay your expenses for your planned 6 months in Florida next winter. I realize this is asking a lot from you, especially if you have a small yard and will have to keep re-mowing over and over again until I can get there, but I think all our friends on the bluebird-L discussion list would be willing to pay top dollar for such a photograph, don't you?

Please post your thoughts by return post as soon as you have the time. I realize you are a man of few words and that you make each word count, so I do not expect a long reply or a lengthy contract for such an adventure.

Sincerely Yours, your pal,
Wendell Long
Waynesville, Ohio

PS: And of course I shall reimburse you for the expense of lawn mower gasoline. Fair is fair. And feel free to discuss with your Sunday School Class before making a final decision since I would be crossing state lines for such a project and I am not sure what ethics may apply in such a case.


From: rindfleisch12"at"elknet.net
To: mariehicks"at"earthlink.net
Cc: Bluebird-L"at"cornell.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 13:37:10 EST
Subject: Shutterbugs and bluebirds

Here's a question for all you shutterbugs….
How do you take a picture of a blue when it's perched on your camera?

Last spring, I purchased a 500 mm lens for my camera and could hardly wait to use it. It was a beautiful sunny day. Packed up my gear and the new lens, a chair and planted myself to get a super pix while the EABL's were just starting their nest building.

Everything is set-up – tri-pod secure, camera & lens focused on the house. Time to get comfortable and wait for the little couple – and with just one click, I'll have my perfect shot upon their arrival. Right?

About 30-45 minutes of patient, quiet waiting, I realized that I had nothing to drink. I can't go thirsty! Besides, the blues were in the nearby trees still, deciding if it was safe to return to their house and finish building their nest. I didn't think my departure would be a big deal for a quick visit to the house and resume my wait with beverage in hand.

I was about 20-30 steps away when I could hear the familiar chirp from where I was just sitting! Sure enough, I turn and there he is, right on top of my camera ready to get a shot of the little lady in their new home! If only I would have had another camera to take a pix of the little blue photographer. It was too funny. I guess he liked the viewing advantage, as he stayed there for some time. Looked like a Picture Pefect perch!

Too cold today (-3 F). Even my little ducks were shivering this morning.

Thankfully, a warm up is on the way.

Good luck shutter bugs,
Cheryl - SE Wisconsin

On Sat, 8 Mar 2003 14:59:28 -0500 Marie Hicks wrote:

Thanks for all the wonderful encouragement and advice about
photographing bluebirds.


From: thebird"at"tmbstudios.com
Date: 11 Mar 2003 18:35:57 -0000
To: BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Subject: Bluebird photo contest

Let's try it again. If the link doesn't open, try ust cutting and pasting the whole url into your address window. For some reason, when I posted before, only the first part of the url came out as a link - although that should have opened the main page, I would think. Oh well, never can figure out why these things don't work!

http://www.tmbstudios.com/Bluebirds.htm


From: "Gary Springer" springer"at"alltel.net
To: "BLUEBIRD-L" BLUEBIRD-L"at"cornell.edu
Cc: "Gary Springer" springer"at"alltel.net
Subject: Photographs inside nest boxes
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2003 09:35:28 -0500

Marie Wrote:

"Still wishing I could get some good photos, but the nest is built up so high inside the box that I can't get a good camera angle from my side-opening box. I angled the camera in just enough to document the eggs, but the photo is out of focus... too close up for the digital lens. Anyway, I am so thrilled to have bluebird eggs in our new nestbox, even if I can't photograph them!"

Another advantage of using screws instead of nails to put together nest boxes is that if screws are used the roof can be removed for photographing the eggs and nestlings.

If the box was assembled using screws, simply remove those holding on the roof, remove the roof, take the photographs, replace the roof and turn in the screws just far enough to hold the roof on until all photographs of the clutch have been taken in the following days, and finally, turn in the screws.all the way until photographs of other clutches are wanted.

And, if you want to get the best photographs, use a nest box with a gable roof like the Chalet because far more light enters the box through the sides after the top is removed. Further, if the box is mounted so raccoons and larger predators can not get to the box and a thick wooden gable roof is used, it isn't even necessary to turn in any of the screws until after all photographs are taken because the roof will not fall or blow off the box.as with most other nest boxes. For added security turning in one screw a couple of turns is all that is needed.

Check out Malinda's photographs in the Bluebird Monitor's Guide.

Gary Springer



From: thebird"at"tmbstudios.com
Date: 11 Mar 2003 18:35:57 -0000
Subject: Bluebird photo contest

Let's try it again. If the link doesn't open, try just cutting and pasting the whole url into your address window. For some reason, when I posted before, only the first part of the url came out as a link - although that should have opened the main page, I would think. Oh well, never can figure out why these things don't work!

http://www.tmbstudios.com/Bluebirds.htm


From: "Gary Springer" springer"at"alltel.net
Subject: Photographs inside nest boxes
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2003 09:35:28 -0500

Marie Wrote:

"Still wishing I could get some good photos, but the nest is built up so high inside the box that I can't get a good camera angle from my side-opening box. I angled the camera in just enough to document the eggs, but the photo is out of focus... too close up for the digital lens. Anyway, I am so thrilled to have bluebird eggs in our new nestbox, even if I can't photograph them!"

Another advantage of using screws instead of nails to put together nest boxes is that if screws are used the roof can be removed for photographing the eggs and nestlings.

If the box was assembled using screws, simply remove those holding on the roof, remove the roof, take the photographs, replace the roof and turn in the screws just far enough to hold the roof on until all photographs of the clutch have been taken in the following days, and finally, turn in the screws.all the way until photographs of other clutches are wanted.

And, if you want to get the best photographs, use a nest box with a gable roof like the Chalet because far more light enters the box through the sides after the top is removed. Further, if the box is mounted so raccoons and larger predators can not get to the box and a thick wooden gable roof is used, it isn't even necessary to turn in any of the screws until after all photographs are taken because the roof will not fall or blow off the box.as with most other nest boxes. For added security turning in one screw a couple of turns is all that is needed.

Check out Malinda's photographs in the Bluebird Monitor's Guide.

Gary Springer


From: Maynard R Sumner, m-r-sumner"at"juno.com
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2003 9:37 PM
Subject: Re: Digital camera Binoculars

On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 16:32:07 -0600 "Mary Beth Roen" writes:...I am thinking about buying a digital camera binoculars. Has anyone had any experience with these? Are they worth buying? If so, which ones would you recommend? I do a lot of nature watching and it seems that the combination of binoculars and digital camera would be ideal, if it works. Thanks! Mary Roen, River Falls, WI 

****

I have the Meade combination binoculars and digital camera. It is OK if you put it on a tripod. Maynard Sumner Flint, MI


From: Wendell Long, mrsimple33"at"go-concepts.com
Sent: Wednesday, December 24, 2003 4:20 PM
Subject: update address on links

Friends, My updated link for my photos is: http://www2.go-concepts.com/~mrsimple33 Thanks to all who have linked, however many are using old outdated address. Please double check ...

Wendell Long Waynesville, Ohio


From: Wendell Long, mrsimple33"at"go-concepts.com
Sent: Thursday, February 05, 2004 10:22 AM
Subject: Bluebird Therapy for the Disabled plus a Zany Issue.

Friends, The Bluebird has become important to me over the years as it has for most of the people on this list. I feel somewhat qualified to say this discussion group and the bluebird is especially helpful to the persons who are classified as "disabled". (My qualifications include the fact that, as most of you know, I have Parkinson's disease while my wife (the bride) has Multiple Sclerosis. We might be called care givers to each other. She more than I. I am more likely called "receiver" or perhaps a wide receiver if you are a football fan. I do not seek sympathy by stating the foregoing--just establishing the fact that I know something of the value of the bluebird in making life more enjoyable for those with disabilities. Many people are able to combine additional activities associated with birding such as box building, photography and landscaping to name a few. I just want to express my own personal thank you for your many friendships and enjoyable times you all have sent my way over the years by way of our discussions and activities in getting to know the bluebird. I appreciate your many kind remarks and warm friendships made through this association of above average souls.

Ok enough thanks for one day! On to a Zany issue. I enjoy thinking of myself as a simple person. While, at the same time my bride and certain photo editors of world class serious wild bird magazines prefer to think of me as Zany. Zany being defined here as Simpleton. Or at the least think of some of my bird photography at times to be in the Zany category and tell me so! But that is okay since they are all well meaning good people. As I have reported before, my grammar school report card(on the character side) reported me to be "inclined to mischief". But later "shows improvement". So, I felt recovered. I think Kentucky had good schools in the 1930's. Anyway to get on with it here. I am making available at no cost to all members my new signature photograph I took in my backyard just a few days back. It is destined to become world class(I don't care what the bride says). I know a good photo when I see one even if it is Zany. You may find it useful if you have a sense of humor combined with a simple personality. Just write and I will email a small attachment to you. It does not contain a bluebird, however if I were a presenter or publisher I would use it anyway. Don't hesitate to write--they are going fast and supply is limited to the number of request I receive!! Another advantage of list membership! Sincerely, Wendell Long Waynesville, OH


From: Bet Zimmerman, ezdz"at"charter.net
Sent: Thursday, February 05, 2004 5:08 PM
Subject: Birding fotos with a few blues

For those interested in seeing fotos by some of Bluebird_L's illustrious photographers, including some funny ones featuring Wendell Long's goose decoy, see http://www.woodstockconservation.org/birdsofwoodstock.htm. It's in draft form because I still need to get permission for couple of fotos and work on the layout. (If you see any mistakes on there, please let me know! ) A list of birds found in my area is on http://www.woodstockconservation.org/birding.htm). I also put up the nice summary from the recent Birdscope on how to be a bird friendly family. .... Bet from CT


From: ptom"at"austin.rr.com
Sent: Monday, March 15, 2004 7:09 PM
Subject: photographer with day by day photos

Some time back, a bluebirder on this list took photos of each day in the life of an Eastern Bluebird nestling. I'd like to contact the photographer. Can anyone provide assistance? Thanks! Pauline Tom Mountain City (no mountains) TX


From: Gene Pugh, genop62"at"hotmail.com
Sent: Monday, March 15, 2004 1:17 AM
Subject: Re: photographer with day by day NESTLING photos

Pauline,  I had a live Blue Bird Webcam up last year and transmitted live videos.                                                                          Gene


From: Bet Zimmerman, ezdz"at"charter.net
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2004 12:22 PM
Subject: RE: photographer with day by day NESTLING photos

Malinda Mastako's fab fotos (day by day) are in the Bluebird Monitor's Guide...the same Malinda whoposts on the Garden Web Bluebirding Forum....


From: Evelyn Cooper, emcooper"at"bayou.com
Sent: Tuesday, March 23, 2004 9:28 AM
Subject: Bluebird Pictures

If any of you have pictures you have taken of  Bluebirds and would like to share them with us on our website please send them to me. If you have a link that you can send, that would be even better. Thanks, Evelyn Cooper Delhi, LA Member NABS Louisiana Bayou Bluebird Society Affiliate of NABS www.labayoubluebirdsociety.org


From: Bruce Burdett, blueburd"at"tds.net
Sent: Tuesday, March 23, 2004 3:13 PM
Subject: "Yankee" To the Constituency, The cover of the April issue of "Yankee: The Magazine of New England Living" features a photo of a male Eastern Bluebird, perched on a blooming apple bough. We all know that Wendell (what's-his-name) Long is the best Bluebird photographer in Ohio, perhaps in the world, and that he's also a very nice fellow in most respects. But I think that this Marie Read who took the picture on "Yankee" has done a very beautiful job. Whether she's as nice a person as Wendell I really don't know, since I've never made her acquaintance. Perhaps she is. But to be as good a photographer AND as nice a person as Wendell would be a tall order, and beyond the reach of most ordinary mortals. I've been trying to emulate him for some years now without any noticeable success. Whenever I malign him, I realize afterward that I only do it out of jealousy and frustration. Anyway.............try to see the April "Yankee." I think you'll agree that the cover is remarkable. Bruce Burdett SW NH


From: Fawzi P. Emad, femad"at" comcast.net
Sent: Tuesday, March 23, 2004 4:55 PM
Re: "Yankee"

To see the cover Bruce is referring to, (though a lot smaller than the real cover,) try this link: http://www.yankeemagazine.com/thisissue/contents.php


From: judymellin, judymellin"at"netzero.net
Sent: Tuesday, March 23, 2004 9:32 PM
Re: "Yankee"

Several years ago, Ruth Edwards, who used to be on this list and, hopefully, still is, sent me the MOST amazing bluebird photo of a male perched on some goldenrod in her pasture. Ruth, if you're still on the list and that photo is available, I think you would knock everybody's socks off! As I remember, she is a YANKEE, too! Judy Mellin NE IL.


From: bluebirdnutcafe"at"icqmail.com
Sent: Thursday, March 25, 2004 7:45 AM
Subject: Bluebird Photo Contest is back!

After taking a break through the winter months, the Bluebird Nut Bluebird Photo Contest is back. We have a new host and polling service for the contest, and I'm taking entries for the contest right now! I know some of you enjoyed participating last year, and I wanted to extend the invitation to you all again this year. In addition, for those of you who may have pictures of birds other than bluebirds, we're also running a "Other Birds & Animals" photo contest at the same time. You can find all the details at http://www.bluebirdnut.com/photo_contest.htm If you have any questions, please direct them to me at bluebirdnutcafe"at"icqmail.com. Sometimes I will miss a Message posted exclusively to the list, because my digest-format e-mail is very difficult to read. I have to scroll through all the MIME jumble to get to the meat of the Messages, and I don't always catch everything!


From: Mr. Tracy L. Powell, sialia"at"magnolia-net.com
Sent: Saturday, March 27, 2004 12:09 AM
Subject: cavity nesters website

I put all of my photos of cavity nesting birds' nests on the following website: http://cavitynesters.4t.com if anyone is interested. I have bluebird, chickadees, ducks, screech owls, and wrens. I'll be adding more pics this season as I take them. Thanks, Tracy Powell Arkansas


From: Michelle Martin [mailto:shell7"at"cox.net]
Sent: Saturday, April 17, 2004 10:31 AM
Subject: Would love to share my EABL nesting with you

I put together an album of pics , hoping to get them all in order for a story type of my EABL's nesting with me this season.   I wanted to share it with everyone because the bluebirds are such a huge part of my life, and I'm blessed to have had them trust me yet again !  The babies left the box on the 15th, and today , the parents are back in the box checking things out.  Hopefully , another nesting to follow.  Thank you all on this list , it sure has been nice to read all of the advice and stories.  So, this is my way of saying thank you !  Click on this link for the album : http://www.pbase.com/shave21/nesting_cycle-eastern_bluebirds
and click on the thumbnails for a larger view of each picture. Michelle Martin
Central Louisiana


From: "Haleya Priest"
Sent: Wednesday, May 05, 2004 10:33 PM
Subject: Need artist Robt McCaw/Ontario EABL Society

...Our MBA found a wonderful drawing of a bluebird drawn by artist: Robt McCaw; Ontario EABL Society. Our member artist wants to use it for our revised logo. Can someone help find him so we can get permission from him????? We are of course a small NABS affiliate and would give him all due credit for the drawing. ...


From: Larry A Broadbent [mailto:rockets"AT"mnsi.net]
Sent: Thursday, May 06, 2004 2:20 PM
Re: Need artist Robt McCaw/Ontario EABL Society

Haleya, If you are referring to Robert McCaw ( the top Canadian bird photographer), then here is his email address. robertmccaw"AT"sympatico.ca Regards, Larry A Broadbent


From: Wendell Long [mailto:mrsimple33"at"go-concepts.com]
Sent: Thursday, June 24, 2004 3:51 PM
Subject: Bluebird Photo Publisher Available? ....

My question to the members---are you like me--do you get bored and afraid sometimes? I try to keep upbeat and do stuff to keep busy and think up things and I enjoy your e-mail. What do you all think of this? Is there any potential in creating a bluebird calendar and do we have talent among us to do so? I would be happy to provide, along with other bluebird photographers on the list, the photos for a 12 month or more time frame. If someone has any interest in publishing and editing it. If a profit is turned then it could be donated to NABS, Cornell or another worthy bluebird charity such as Bruce Burdett. Or Bet Z(wow what nice work she does!!!!). Anyone with recommendations post 'em on the list for all to consider, ok? Wendell Long(Mr. Simple) Waynesville, Ohio Represented by Wendell Long


From: Cher [mailto:bluebirdnut"at"a-znet.com]
Sent: Thursday, June 24, 2004 4:54 PM
Re: Bluebird Photo Publisher Available?

I have aspired to the project of a Bluebird Calendar for some time, but until recently could not produce digital photographs of high enough quality to meet the specifications necessary. I currently have a Cafepress shop with many products made from my photographs, and I hoped to produce a calendar for 2005, including on it photographs of my own, with perhaps those of others, including some of my Bluebird Photo Contest winners. Cafepress is a print-on-demand operation, so there is no overhead, no up-front costs, and no need for storing, handling, shipping. Print-on-demand generally has a slim profit margin, and Cafepress is no exception. But for my purposes the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. My idea was to produce a calendar, with a good portion of the profits going to an as-yet-undetermined worthy Bluebird cause. I have the technical know-how and ability, and the shop is already set up. If this seemed a feasible route, I would be happy to host such a calendar in my shop and dedicate all of the profit from this particular item to whatever Bluebird cause was deemed worthy by the majority. If another route seems more practical or profitable, I'd be happy to assist in any way I can, whether it be by researching other publishing options, donating photos (although mine don't aspire to be of the high quality of Mr. Simple's!), or by assisting with technical questions. Cher www.BluebirdNut.com


From: Wendell Long [mailto:mrsimple33"at"go-concepts.com]
Sent: Friday, June 25, 2004 4:56 PM
Subject: photo equipment for the birds.

People ask me what I use and what I recommend for taking bluebird pictures. Mr. Burdett charges me with false advertising talent when he claims it is only expensive equipment--no more no less. I plead not guilty. The key for good bird photos includes waiting, waiting and more waiting and sooner or later something will show up. Therefore a lazy personality is the greatest asset in my opinion. I drive a Chevrolet and never owned a Cadillac. Although I would recommend the Chevy SSR for consideration. By the same token I never owned A Canon Pro camera with a 600mm IS lens even if one of my best friends recommends it for bird shooting. Personally I don't think equipment makes much difference except when I am crying just after THE perfect moment flew away! Like the other day when I was focused on a post and out of the blue a hawk stopped by for two seconds and I was so flabbergasted I fired at second three. 33% too late. Anyway, if you are looking for me the next few months I will be sitting near the post waiting for the hawk. He may never show again but if he does I will be set on manual focus with an average depth of field and I won't be disappointed should a bluebird not appear at the same moment in time. Bottom line is of course "if you don't have what you want, then want what you have". Right now I want a chair near my post. So, if you drive by on the big road and see an old man sitting in a plastic chair, near a fence post, stop by and let him know you wish him good color overcast sky in case something special drops by. Wendell .


From: Shane&Emily Marcotte
Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2004 8:50 PM
Subject: Photos Hello All,     Someone sent me a link to a site that included alot of photos of bluebirders.I recognize a few names but a whole bunch of them I've never seen on this list in the 2 years I've been here.These people used to be members and if not any longer why did they leave? I have 1 nestbox of  5 that still has babies.But there are bunches of  little ones all hanging around enjoying all the plump Louisiana bugs!!    Phil Berry where in Fl do you reside? I just took a trip to Pensacola Beach and I thought about you while I was there.Boy, those waters are alot nicer than Biloxi and Gulfport!!:) Shane Marcotte Watson Louisiana LBBS Member  


From: Evelyn Cooper [mailto:emcooper"at"bayou.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2004 10:11 PM
RE: Photos

Shane, if you are referring to the pictures on Jim's BluebirdBox, these are mostly pictures of people that attended the NABS convention. Some are not, but most are. They are not necessarily members of the Bluebird List that left. Some are members and do not post very often. Some have never been members of the Bluebird List. At one time, Jim asked for pictures of bluebirders so we could put a face to names and that is why you see some that did not attend conventions. I would think there would be room for more! Evelyn Cooper Delhi, LA

[note from Webmaster: 1944 picture of Bruce Burdett at http://www.bigonville.com/military/188ecb.html]


From: Wendell Long [mailto:mrsimple33"at"go-concepts.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 3:54 PM
Subject: bluebird photo links http://img78.photobucket.com/albums/v283/MrSimple/

http://www2.go-concepts.com/~mrsimple33/

Be my guest. Help yourself to photos. Wendell Long Waynesville, OH


From: Cher [mailto:bluebirdnut"at"a-znet.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 15, 2004 9:41 AM
Subject: Help for hurricane-displaced Bluebirds

Within a few days, the 2005 Bluebird Nut Calendar should be in my online shop and ready to order. The profits from the sale of this year's calendar will go first to help rebuild/repair nestboxes lost or damaged by this year's run of hurricanes in Florida, and those sure to be affected soon in Alabama and Louisiana. I haven't ironed out ALL the details yet, since the storms are still in progress, and there hasn't even been time to assess the damages done thus far. I'd be happy to hear from anyone who has any ideas on the administrative side of this project. I'll post again when the Calendar is online. Cher


From: charlene anchor [mailto:charleneanchor"at"msn.com]
Sent: Wednesday, October 13, 2004 8:48 AM
Subject: OT/digiscoping

For those interested in digiscoping - the Nov/Dec '04 issue of Bird Watcher's Digest has a very helpful article on it called "What the Heck Is Digiscoping?"   The following websites are also listed:  www.dpreview.com www.shortcourses.com/how/digiscoping/digiscoping.htm www.digiscoping.co.uk www.digiscopingukbirds.homestead.com www.lawrencepoh.com www.opticsforbirding.com I didn't check out the websites.  Charlene Anchor, Illinois


From: Wendell Long [mailto:mrsimple33"at"go-concepts.com]
Sent: Monday, October 18, 2004 11:09 AM
Subject: MrSimple Photos

My Friends of the Bluebird List, This is not an advertisement. As you all know, photography is a hobby of mine and I want to invite Friends of the Bluebird to review my photo album named MrSimple. If you find any of the pictures helpful in your birding work and play please help yourself to any images suitable to your needs. As usual of course no cost. By the way I am not an owner of Photobucket, I just like their new web site. If you wish to review my album just click the following link. Thank you for your kind attention and your friendship through our mutual interest in birding. Wendell Long Waynesville, OH aka MrSimple http://photobucket.com/albums/v283/MrSimple/?start=all


From: bridget mcgann [mailto:lilbmcg "at"gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, May 20, 2007 10:27 PM
Subject: Posting photos

I have a question --

Are posting links to photos on Flickr okay with the moderators, here?  For some reason I seem to recall being rebuked for posting a link to photos here once...but it was a while ago and I don't remember details.  I think it was something to do with preventing viruses or something.  But I think we can be sure that any link with " www.flickr.com" in the URL would be safe.  Mods, what say you?

Bridget IHAVEBLUEBIRDS!!! McGann
Granger, IN

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