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Click to go to Audubon Society of Omaha Home Page Audubon Society of OmahaEastern Bluebird

Welcome to The Bluebird Box since 1995
Best of Bluebird Mailing Lists Classified

Window Strikes (& Bluebirds) (Part 2)



From: Torrey [mailto:torrey_canyon"at"yahoo.com]
Sent: Wednesday, February 08, 2006 11:03 AM
Subject: Re: Birds and windows

We had a report this year of a Wild Turkey attacking its reflection in somebody's basement windows late in January. A determined turkey could probably break a window. I'd rather have a Northern Cardinal attack my sideview mirror any day. :-)

Torrey Wenger
Kalamazoo Nature Center
Kalamazoo, MI



From: happywebl"a"comcast.net [mailto:happywebl"a"comcast.net]
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2006 1:55 PM
Subject: window strike problem

We've discussed this problem before and I've always had success preventing strikes by using hawk silhouettes made of black vinyl. Last week I received a mailing from Audubon, which contained a gift of a small (6") hawk silhouette. Since my male WEBL has been tapping at all my windows, I welcomed an additional deterrent and put it on the bedroom window next to which he perches on a topiary.

It drove him wild! He started attacking the little silhouette and I had to go out and take it down. He avoids the larger ones, so I wonder if it's the size that was the problem, or just that it was a change in his environment?

I'm looking after my neighbors' home while they vacation, and this week I saw the male BB up there, tapping on their kitchen window. He's claiming the entire neighborhood!

Barbara in Cloverdale, CA


From: Theresa
Sent: Saturday, April 01, 2006
Subject: Strange Female EABL Behavior

I'm a newbie to blue birding, but a lifelong bird lover. I put up a brand new Peterson bluebird house in my backyard February '06 and an EABL pair quickly claimed it and began building a nest last weekend (3/25) mainly with dry twigs from a nearby tree and grasses. They are very territorial (especially the male) and chase away all birds that investigate a 6 apartment birdhouse about 25 yards away, that I was hoping to get tree swallows nesting in. I checked the bluebird box today and the nest is not yet complete. My EABL pair has been more visible around the box and the yard today, more than they have been previously, but I have not seen them taking anymore nesting material inside the box.

What is troubling me is that my EABL female has been landing on and attacking (somewhat) all the windows in my house. I am afraid she may hurt herself. She flies in, lands on the screen or edge then repeatedly hovers and attacks the glass with her feet. She has done this on all sides of my house and on the porch and the front door glass. I have window shades that are made of bamboo and rattan on many of the windows...could she be trying to grab more nesting material (because it looks like twigs or wood) or is she just fighting her reflection? My EABL male is not participating in her craziness. At least I've gotten to see her up close and personal...beak to beak, so to speak...she's a cutie. Any insights??

-Theresa Nelsen
Southern Maryland



From: Sara Ann [mailto:sawright"at"direcway.com]
Sent: Saturday, April 01, 2006 9:12 PM
Subject: Re: Strange Female EABL Behavior Hey, Theresa!

I'll be interested in answers you receive, since we've had a female cardinal doing the same things for over a week. I've heard of male birds attacking their reflections thinking they are rivals. But I can't imagine why a female would do this. Our bird has literally knocked herself out on one occasion.
I've wondered if she wasn't seeing reflections of trees that she was trying to get to. Closing blinds and pulling drapes helps some, but we can't stand living in the dark all day!

Then the bird discovered the windows on the truck and started doing the same thing in the garage. A rubber snake slowed her down some. But the bird didn't stop her nonsense altogether. She just studies the snake as if to figure out how to get beyond him......

For days, a male cardinal followed the female everywhere, fussing at her, but he seems to have given up and has moved on. The female now just goes from window to window, fairly subdued. It's very strange and a little sad.

Sara Ann Wright
Thayer MO


From: JBrindo"at"aol.com [mailto:JBrindo"at"aol.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 02, 2006 8:49 AM
Subject: Re: Strange Female EABL Behavior

Hi Theresa - Thanks for sharing this female's behavior. I too have seen this but with Robins around our home. Since the Bluebird and Robin are related, this may be normal territorial behavior witnessed during nesting season when territories are being established. I've also found that some Bluebirds are aggressively protective and some very passive. Can you move the BB box away from your house without loosing your great view?
Jay K. Brindo
Mountain Glen Farm BB Trail
Ohio Bluebird Society Geauga County Coordinator
Northeastern Ohio



From: Torrey [mailto:torrey_canyon"at"yahoo.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 02, 2006 2:41 PM
Subject: Re: Strange Female EABL Behavior Hi Theresa,

Both members of the pair will defend their territory.
Males defend the larger territory against other males & females defend close to the nest site against other females.

We get a lot of these types of calls at the nature center (normally it's male cardinals) & i always ask the people if their windows are clean & shiny. :-) You can get clingy things, both hawk silhouettes & see-thru UV leaf shapes, that may help. Hopefully, tho, once she's got eggs, she'll be too busy to worry about those weird females in the windows.

Torrey Wenger
Kalamazoo Nature Center
Kalamazoo, MI



From: Jimmy Dodson [mailto:rocks_and_flies"at"hotmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 02, 2006 9:47 PM
Subject: RE: Strange Female EABL Behavior

I don't remember the specifics right off hand, but I'm going to check the literature I have easy access to... but here's a possible idea. Females of many species produce slightly different hormones than males... go figure :)... but as they get older, they produce less and less of these hormones and take on more and more male "traits", even appearance-wise (plummage).

Like I said, I'll see what I can find and let you know, but there may be something like that working here. Then again, as previously mentioned, it could be a species-specific female behavior. Not sure yet. Take care --J

Jimmy Dodson
Asst Forest Manager -- NCSU Dept of Forestry & Environmental Resources NCSU Hill Forest P.O. Box 71 Rougemont, NC 27572


From: Bet Zimmerman [mailto:ezdz"at"charter.net]
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 2:21 PM
Subject: RE: Unusal behavior

Earlier arrival might be associated with global warming.

I have read about curious bluebirds hanging around houses. Usually it’s associated with feeding mealworms, but some people think it’s just nosey-ness. See more info at http://www.sialis.org/windowstrikes.htm

Bet from CT



From: The Nelsens [mailto:dtnelsen"at"gmpexpress.net]
Sent: Sunday, April 16, 2006 5:14 PM
Subject: Nest Height?

....

P.S. This is the same female bluebird who still attacks my back windows and noses around on the screens. I put up a wind sock/kite on the overhang above the windows, but she is undeterred. May try some mylar strips on the windows next.

Thanks for any insight.

-Theresa Nelsen
Southern Maryland



From: Paula Ziebarth [mailto:paulaz"at"columbus.rr.com]
Sent: Monday, June 12, 2006 5:13 PM
Subject: Re: Pest of a Bluebird

Judy,

The behavior you describe is almost certainly caused by the male seeing his reflection in your glass and attacking the male he thinks he sees in his valuable territory. I am guessing you have clean windows :) I am also guessing that your window is within 100 yards of his nest box? He is not even seeing the cat beyond the glass - focused on his reflection on the outside glass panel.

I have had this happen before too. What works very well for a particular window is to dampen a rag, put a little toothpaste on it and smear it on outside of glass. It is very easy to clean off later, but the male will no longer see his reflection and will leave the window alone.

Unfortunately, they generally just go to the next window down (as they did to your neighbor's window) and start attacking that one. I toothpasted my window and it worked great for a couple of days. After that, I got tired of not seeing out the window and washed it off. The EABL seemed to calm down a little once he had chicks to feed.

Paula Z
Powell (Central) Ohio


From: Fultons [mailto:thefultons"at"everestkc.net]
Sent: Friday, June 16, 2006 4:43 PM
Subject: OT-"Glass ranks second only to habitat loss as leading cause of death for birds"

A very disturbing article was in our local paper, The Kansas City Star, today regarding birds flying into glass structures. So, not only is man taking away from their habitat, now we are building "trendy glass-skinned" buildings for looks!! It's based on buildings going up in the Kansas City area. It's states, "that since May 1, one to two birds a day have been found dead outside ONE Johnson County 40 foot glass wall".

Just another obstacle these creatures have to deal with, with humans invading their territory. It also states, "In the US alone, one researcher's estimate, more than a billion birds perish when windows abruptly end their travel. In Chicago and New York, buildings can claim up to 200 brids a day"!!!!!

There's also a statement about another office park in the KC area that "most glass buildings have landscaping right next to them, and if a poor bird should slam into glass, he falls into the bushes and is never going to be seen again" So, how much of you want to bet these new buildings will be rushing to put in tons of landscaping to hide the awful truth of what is really happening!!!

Sorry to ramble and put an OFF TOPIC, but I'm so upset about this, I wanted to vent to people who would understand my anger!!

Not sure what I could do to make a difference on this one!!

Thanks for listening.

cristy
lenexa, KS


From: Bet Zimmerman [mailto:ezdz"at"charter.net]
Sent: Thursday, June 22, 2006 1:37 PM
Subject: RE: OT-"Glass ranks second only to habitat loss as leading cause of death for birds"

I think window strikes are rarely a cause of death for bluebirds, and usually are associated with
territoriality (banging into their reflection.) In backyards, feeder location can be a contributing
cause. From one article I read, the total numbers of birds killed by window strikes is a very very
rough estimate, but clearly it's a problem.

See more info here on reasons and prevention: http://www.sialis.org/windowstrikes.htm

For some reason, this topic is getting some press lately, which may lead to pressure on architects.

Bet from CT



From: denisefarmer"at"comcast.net [mailto:denisefarmer"at"comcast.net]
Sent: Thursday, June 22, 2006 7:32 PM
Subject: RE: OT-"Glass ranks second only to habitat loss as leading cause of death for birds"

I cannot remember where I read it, but if feeders are going to be close to windows, the article said they should be 10 feet or less so that they cannot get enough speed to hurt themselves and otherwise, have them greater then 20ft so they avoid them when startled and just take off. Makes sense to me

Denise
Parkville, MD



From: MJ Shearer [mailto:eshearer"at"comcast.net]
Sent: Thursday, June 22, 2006 3:48 PM
Subject: Re: OT-"Glass ranks second only to habitat loss as leading cause of death for birds"

Happens all too often to bluebirds here in Atlanta, Bet.

I believe "tower kill" is a more serious problem, but glass buildings account for many bird deaths.

MJ

Mary Jane Shearer; Tucker, GA



From: rdb"at"att.net [mailto:rdb"at"att.net]
Sent: Thursday, June 22, 2006 4:42 PM
Subject: Re: OT-"Glass ranks second only to habitat loss as leading cause of death for birds"

Were the articles referring to birds during migration time which collide at night with lighted city buildings? Chicago instituted a program of 'lights out' during migration periods, and I thought some other cities followed suit. There are some huge losses associated with those type of collisions.

http://www.terrain.org/articles/15/kousky.htm

Interestingly, in earlier days, lighthouse keepers used to keep track of the migratory dead birds that they found around their lighthouses in the morning and would submit detailed accounts to the old Biological Bird Survey as part of their job. Migrating birds were drawn in by the flashing light and would collide with the tower in the dark of night.

--rudy
in maryland



From: Bet Zimmerman [mailto:ezdz"at"charter.net]
Sent: Thursday, June 22, 2006 7:38 PM
Subject: RE: OT-"Glass ranks second only to habitat loss as leading cause of death for birds"

Do not place feeders directly in front of windows.

Move bird feeders or bird baths farther away (25-30 feet from the window) OR
Put feeders or bird baths closer (within 1-3 feet of the window) so birds aren't moving fast enough
to get hurt.

Move nestboxes 100 feet or so from the building (to prevent territorial strikes).

If the bird is using a favorite perch or two while watching the window, try removing those perches,
or temporarily blocking access to them (territorial strikes).

Don't hang houseplants inside windows where strikes are common.

Other methods (like netting which is very effective) here: http://www.sialis.org/windowstrikes.htm

Bet from CT


From: wensuz"at"isp.com [mailto:wensuz"at"isp.com]
Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 1:42 PM
Subject: Downy rescue

Hi Bluebird gang, this is Wendy in OH. I've been having problems with the EUST going after my Suet and feeders, I caged in my post mounted Gazebo feeder, thanks to the idea from a fellow lister, and that is safe. But my screen feeder and suet feeder were vulnerable, so I moved them up under my balcony, 8' out from the house so I could defend them more easily. The only problem is the birds now strike the windows on take off, some harder than others, until this morning none was serious.
The male Downy came to the Suet this morning, and upon his take off, hit the window hard and slumped to the ground. Frantic, I ran out to see if he had recovered, but he was still laying motionless on the ground, with one wing outstretched. I gently scooped him up(was amazed at how small they are, they seem so much larger for some reason when viewing them from a distance), and I took him into the garage where it is warmer.
Still nestled in my hands, his eyes were beginning to close, still he was breathing, and I was sobbing and praying that he wouldn't die. I walked with him back outside, and let him hear the sounds of all the other birds near by, thinking this would be the last thing he hears. I gently stroked his tiny head, and he began to look around with wider eyes. I eased my grip a little to see what he would do, not really expecting much, and to my surprise and delight, he gracefully fluttered to a nearby tree, and came to rest on a branch. There he rested for 5 minuets or so, and then he flew off and shimmied up a neighboring tree, searching for his next meal!:) I immediately moved the feeders back to their station near the trees, never again will they come up near the house. I figure it's better to contend with the marauding starlings, than the death of a precious songbird. Within 30 minuets or so, the male DOWP was again at the feeding station, refueling. I was so relieved to see him apparently none the worse for wear from his ordeal. I am now going to cage in my Suet and other feeders so I won't have to resort to such measures in the future. I hope I wasn't doing anything illegal by handling the Downy, I did not want to leave him lay on the ground, for fear he may become prey for some opportunist. Even before I ever moved the feeder up to house, some birds still managed to hit the windows while they are flying about. I lost one female House Finch last summer to this, is there anyway to prevent window strikes, short of boarding up windows?!


From: happywebl"at"comcast.net [mailto:happywebl"at"comcast.net]
Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 2:09 PM
Subject: Re: Downy rescue

Hi Wendy, and List,

I've had window strike related deaths several times over the years, and I haven't really found a perfect solution. I bought hawk silhouettes which are self-sticking to the windows. I leave them on all year, because the birds are always here. They seem to help, but last year my male WEBL decided to fight with one of them and I had to remove it. He was flying at it all day long!

Window screens help the most; the birds still hit the screens, but they are flexible and the birds don't injure themselves. Only half of my windows are screened, since the slide open sideways, so I put the hawks on the unscreened windows. I also put up sun catchers, that stick to the window, other stick on decorations, etc. Anything that breaks up the expanse!

I have noticed that the birds are more likely to hit the window in the early evening, due to the angle of the sun. My windows are under a covered porch, so I think they possibly only see the sky reflected when the sun is low. I have had a couple of bird deaths, but I've also had several recover, as your Downy did.

The window strikes are often related to hawk attacks, when the birds panic and fly in every direction. I"m interested in new suggestions too, since I'm sure it is an on-going problem for everyone!

Barbara in Cloverdale, CA (with snow on our mountain tops!)


From: Steve and Cindy Groene [mailto:hausgroene"at"comcast.net]
Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 2:46 PM
Subject: RE: Downy rescue

Wendy- You did really well by the Downy. I would have also picked him up to prevent predators from getting him. I don't think you did anything illegal
at all, but I might get set straight on that :). Glad he recovered.

I have bird strikes on my windows from time to time. Like Barbara's, they are most frequently related to the Cooper's hawk who swoops in for a meal.
99% of my bird strikes are mourning doves. I've never lost a mourning dove and I've had some that hit the window hard! I found a HOSP lying on the ground dead (darn!) a few months back that I thought had probably hit the window. I also found a house finch lying dead under an adjacent window.
That window is in my laundry room and has never had a bird strike it before, that I was aware of, but who knows for certain anyway.

I don't have any good answers to the problem. I've even had bird strikes (mourning doves again, they must be terrible manueverers) on my half moon bathroom window, nowhere near feeders, w/ shrubs all around.

Cindy Groene
South Lyon, MI


From: Duane Rice [mailto:drbirdsong4"at"hotmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 9:09 PM
Subject: Re: Downy rescue

What works for me:
Small suction cups with hooks (sold at Wal-Mart), stuck to the window, with compact discs hanging on them (shiny side facing outdoors).
Nothing is absolutely fool proof, but this works pretty good for me and my feathered friends.
I've also experimented with distance from feeders to windows ratio.
Futher away=less impacts=less fatalities=everybody's happy!!!!!!
DR


From: David Elwonger [mailto:davidelwonger"at"comcast.net]
Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2007 11:22 AM
Subject: Re: Downy rescue

Wendy,
You did great!
I am a bander and handle many birds.
I have had warblers hit my windows and be stunned but alive. If it is evening and cold, I have kept them inside, warm, dry and safe in a big shoe box - in the dark they calm right down.
Put a small drop of sugar water like you put in hummingbird feeders (or pedialyte) on their bill before putting them in the box and before letting them go - or just take the box outside first thing in the morning and open it and hopefully it will fly away. If it is dead, put it in a ziplock with the date and freeze it, and send it to your local museum of natural history who usually welcome fresh frozen specimens for their gruesome collections of skins!
But prevention is the best plan, as you have made some changes.
Dave


From: Dottie [mailto:yumyumkatts"at"voyager.net]
Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2007 11:34 AM
Subject: RE: Downy rescue

I use window clings. They help 99.44% to keep birds from hitting the big
windows. Right now I have up snowflakes and shamrocks. I change them
with the season and/or holiday. They don't hinder our views at all.

Dottie, Brown County, Indiana


From: T LINEHAN [mailto:gtlinehan"at"msn.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2007 6:35 PM
Subject: Re: Downy rescue

Hi Dottie,
 
Where do you buy your window clings.  I buy Window Alert decals and they are meant for reduce bird collisions with windows. However, they are quite expensive $5.99 for only four. These decals contain a component which brilliantly reflects ultraviolet sunlight. This ultraviolet light is invisible to humans. but glows brilliantly for birds. They are shaped like a maple leaf and do keep birds from flying into the windows. Another down side is they have to be replace after 2 years.
 
Gail Linehan
Grants Pass, OR

From: Dottie [mailto:yumyumkatts"at"voyager.net]
Sent: Friday, March 02, 2007 10:23 AM
Subject: RE: Downy rescue

Lots of stores including the $stores and hardware stores here sell window
clings. I usually pay .99 cents but also try to find them on sale at 50%
off. Dottie, Brown County, Indiana


From: Bet Zimmerman [mailto:ezdz"at"charter.net]
Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2007 5:22 PM
Subject: RE: Downy rescue window strikes

I added the CD one to my list at http://www.sialis.org/windowstrikes.htm of ways to prevent window strikes. In terms of recommended distances:

Do not place feeders directly in front of windows.
Move bird feeders or bird baths farther away (25-30 feet from the window).
Put feeders or bird baths closer (within 1-3 feet of the window) so birds aren't moving fast enough to get hurt.

Bet from CT


From: Cher [mailto:bluelist"at"localnet.com]
Sent: Friday, March 16, 2007 9:57 AM
Subject: Re: Young still with parents

I've had four Bluebirds feasting on mealworms ever since our late-starting winter season really got going this year. I believe this was last year's nesting couple, plus another two - probably a couple of last year's youngsters.

Week before last, I began to notice what I call a bit of "crankiness" on the part of Mom & Dad - I think they were telling the young'uns "It's time to get your OWN place!"

This week, we had a couple of days with temperatures in the low 60's, there's been a lot of nestbox shopping & wing-waving, and I've seen
*nothing* of last year's youngsters.

In fact, yesterday my female was driving me bananas! I've had one-way film installed in the lower half of my dining room and kitchen windows so as to be able to have feeders right outside. My indoor kitties get too excited when they see birds outside the windows, and without the film, they frighten the birds away when they lunge at the windows!

I've been on the lookout for signs of aggression or mistaken identity or window strikes as a result of using the one-way film, as it essentially creates a "mirror" on the outside of the glass, but it's been in place for over a year, and I've never seen the slightest tendency - until yesterday! The female Blue was determined to chase away the "other"
bluebird she thought she saw in the windows! She kept at it all morning, fluttering and beaking the window. My cats thought it was a show being put on especially for them, and lost several hours of nap-time until I finally hit on a temporary solution - I used a sheet of fine-grade bubble-wrap on the outside of the window to break up the reflection. I didn't even have to go outside to do it - I just lowered the upper half of the window, slipped the bubble wrap between the upper and lower halves, then pulled it down to cover the lower half of the window, put a couple of small pieces of masking tape on the inside to affix the wrap at the top, and closed the window over the ends at the bottom.

It isn't pretty, but it did the job - not a single strike since the wrap was put in place. Hopefully, this behavior will only last a short time, however, as now I can't see out through these windows myself! And my kitties are most unhappy ...

What will also be interesting to see is, if - with the return to winter weather that's predicted this week in our area - the adults will allow the kids to 'come home for dinner'. This happened several years back when the adults chased away the youngsters during an early warm spell, then relented and let them come back to eat mealies during a spring snowstorm.

The birds aren't so different from us human parents, after all!

Cher ~ Finger Lakes region, NY State


From: Ed Baker or Bonnie Boex Baker & Boex [mailto:ednbonnie"at"msn.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2007 7:23 PM
Subject: Bluebird & window question

 
Bonnie Boex
Dillon, CO
 
Had a call today from concerned homeowners who have a pair of Mt BB's in their yard; the female fights with one of their windows all day long.
 
I confidently advised that BB's are territorial; the female is most likely seeing her image and thinks it's competition and is attempting to drive the interloping female away;' that it's a temporary thing and maybe they could string ribbon on the window to mitigate the situation, etc.  But their home is all windows, cathedral and otherwise so it would take a major effort.
 
That's when he said the female fought the window all summer long last season and they're concerned for her safety.  The male BB perched and is currently perching nearby watching her.
 
I had no answer for that one except to say birds operate within parameters according to their species but they also have individual personalities; sometimes there's just not a pat answer.  (I was fishing here.)
 
Anyway, I gave them a nestbox to install which might distract her; maybe; maybe not.
 
Is there an answer for this one?  Why the entire season?   I'm guessing the topic has been addressed in prev emails but if it's not a current problem for me I often don't pay attention.

From: Tree Greenwood [mailto:doctree"at"crosslink.net]
Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2007 9:15 PM
Subject: Re: Bluebird & window question

Bonnie, I suggest they try bright lights during the day so birds see what's inside -- human stuff -- rather than the reflection that results from darkness inside and bright sunlit objects outside. An inside cat, dog or person lit by the interior light should frighten the little lady away. Turn the inside lights off as dusk approaches.

Take care,

R J 'Tree' Greenwood
Catlett VA


From: Cher [mailto:bluelist"at"localnet.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2007 10:07 PM
Subject: Re: Bluebird & window question

My female has gone bonkers this year, and has been pecking at all the windows in the back of the house for days now. My son's bedroom is in the basement, and she woke him early early yesterday morning with her shenanigans - sitting in his window and chattering and vocalizing, fluttering up against it, and occasionally beaking it.

This morning she started the same routine, and my son had just about HAD it. He put a stuffed animal in the window and there was sudden silence.

Cher ~ Finger Lakes region, NY State


From: Bet Zimmerman [mailto:ezdz"at"charter.net]
Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2007 3:23 PM
Subject: RE: Bluebird & window question

Tree, does that definitely work?

Bonnie, I have summarized solutions to the window strike problem here:
http://www.sialis.org/windowstrikes.htm. It's an issue for some folks every spring....

Bet from CT


From: Tree Greenwood [mailto:doctree"at"crosslink.net]
Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2007 11:53 PM
Subject: Re: Bluebird & window question

On Thu 22 Mar 2007 at 14:23, "Bet Zimmerman"
<ezdz"at"charter.net> wrote:
> Tree, does that definitely work? ...

Yes, if the interior light is bright enough to equal or overcome the sunlight. The darkness behind glass makes it reflective (scratch through the back of a mirror or look at both sides of a 'one-way glass' installation).
With the interior light equal to or brighter than outside, the glass becomes transparent. Birds see what's on the other side of the glass rather than a reflection of themselves and the outdoor environment.

That won't necessarily stop window strikes. Some birds will still try to escape into the 'human space' on the other side of the glass when fleeing a predator. They may be seriously injured or killed. Some birds seem to be curious and will fly to check things out, gently bumping into the glass. That can be funny but I've never seen a bird injured by a normal flight into my windows. Movement and activities of cats in the home is visible to the birds if the inside is brightly lit and usually scares the birds away.

Bright light inside will eliminate the reflection so the Bluebird won't keep fighting its reflection. My super-intelligent Cardinals and Bluebirds stopped fighting window reflections and moved out to fight the reflections in my car's side-view mirrors.

Take care, Tree


From: KCBSP"at"aol.com [mailto:KCBSP"at"aol.com]
Sent: Friday, March 23, 2007 12:02 AM
Subject: Re: Bluebird & window question

 
This makes much sense to me.  I live in a log home in the woods and it is always dark inside.  Silhouettes and "stuffed animals" do not work. 
 

Kathy Clark, New Cumberland, PA


From: KCBSP"at"aol.com [mailto:KCBSP"at"aol.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 22, 2007 9:39 PM
Subject: Bluebirds and car alarms

I have an older van and Dale has an older Lebaron convertible
 
The bluebird is in love with our mrirors.  noting new..
 
Does this set off alarms in newer cars??   My poopy car just makes smile not upset ever.

Kathy


From: Bob Walshaw [mailto:walshaw1"at"cox.net]
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2007 10:26 PM
Subject: Re: I have same problem in PA

Putting a bag over the car mirror solves the problem. Bluebird Bob, NE-OK

From: happywebl"at"comcast.net [mailto:happywebl"at"comcast.net]
Sent: Wednesday, April 25, 2007 10:18 AM
Subject: Re: I have same problem in PA

We have the problem of male BBs fighting their reflections in windows. Yesterday one of our neighbors who lives two houses up the street came by on our walking path behind our house. He was watching the dozens of beautiful American Goldfinch on the thistle feeder, and asked if we have BBs this year.

He said they were really cool birds, that one of them came to his kitchen window daily and flew at it, hitting the window! Would a male be protecting territory that far from the nest? Last year, the male would do that at the house that is one house closer to ours than this neighbor's home. Now that the chicks have hatched, I believe it will stop as the pair will be too busy.

This male chased a big Scrub Jay last week, actually pulled some of its feathers out. He also chased the lone squirrel that we occasionally see in the oaks behind us. The squirrel seldome comes in our yard, but does explore once in a while.

I've had three neighbors put up boxes but none have ever gotten BBs to nest. One had a pair of TRES one time, and that was it. I have had them every season. Must be location???

Barbara in Cloverdale, CA


From: Steve Murphy Home [mailto:thcri "at"qwest.net]
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2007 7:54 AM
Subject: Dang Windows

I have a Peterson Nest Box just outside one of my windows in which a TRES family had taken over. They built a nest and it looked like they were ready to start a family. But now for over a week we have not seen any activity on or around the box at all. Nest is there and ready. It was also about a week ago we found a male TRES around the back of our house on the ground dead. It looks like it flew into our windows thinking it was a tree and killed itself. These two happenings happened about the same time. I have two other TRES families starting of which one has 4 eggs and the other none so far, hoping to start seeing some today.

Do I take the nest out of the abondoned box and hope some other family will move in or should I just leave it for a while?

Steve Murphy


From: KCBSP "at"aol.com [mailto:KCBSP "at"aol.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2007 10:55 PM
Subject: Bluebirds aren't the only ones who like mirrors! Take a look..


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